Mar 1 - A lot of people are sick of rap???

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 11 years ago '06        #1
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introspekt757 5 heat pts
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Mar 1 - A lot of people are sick of rap???
 

 
Sales of Rap Albums Take Stunning Nosedive
Thursday, March 01, 2007
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NEW YORK —
Maybe it was the umpteenth coke-dealing anthem or soft-pr0n music video. Perhaps it was the preening antics that some call reminiscent of Stepin Fetchit.

The turning point is hard to pinpoint. But after 30 years of growing popularity, rap music is now struggling with an alarming sales decline and growing criticism from within about the culture's negative effect on society.

Rap insiderChuck Creekmur, who runs the leading Web site Allhiphop.com, says he got a message from a friend recently "asking me to hook her up with some Red Hot Chili Peppers because she said she's through with rap. A lot of people are sick of rap ... the negativity is just over the top now."

The rapper Nas, considered one of the greats, challenged the condition of the art form when he titled his latest album "Hip-Hop is Dead." It's at least ailing, according to recent statistics: Though music sales are down overall, rap sales slid a whopping 21 percent from 2005 to 2006, and for the first time in 12 years no rap album was among the top 10 sellers of the year. A recent study by the Black Youth Project showed a majority of youth think rap has too many violent images. In a poll of black Americans by The a.ssociated Press and AOL-Black Voices last year, 50 percent of respondents said hip-hop was a negative force in American society

Nicole Duncan-Smith grew up on rap, worked in the rap industry for years and is married to a hip-hop producer. She still listens to rap, but says it no longer speaks to or for her. She wrote the children's book "I Am Hip-Hop" partly to create something positive about rap for young children, including her 4-year-old daughter.

"I'm not removed from it, but I can't really tell the difference between Young Jeezy and Yung Joc. It's the same dumb stuff to me," says Duncan-Smith, 33. "I can't listen to that nonsense ... I can't listen to another black man talk about you don't come to the 'hood anymore and ghetto revivals ... I'm from the 'hood. How can you tell me you want to revive it? How about you want to change it? Rejuvenate it?"

Hip-hop also seems to be increasingly blamed for a variety of social ills. Studies have attempted to link it to everything from teen drug use to increased s3xual activity among young girls.

Even the mayhem that broke out in Las Vegas during last week's NBA All-Star Game was blamed on hip-hoppers. "(NBA Commissioner) David Stern seriously needs to consider moving the event out of the country for the next couple of years in hopes that young, hip-hop hoodlums would find another event to terrorize," columnist Jason Whitlock, who is black, wrote on AOL.

While rap has been in essence pop music for years, and most rap consumers are white, some worry that the black community is suffering from hip-hop — from the way America perceives blacks to the attitudes and images being adopted by black youth.

But the rapper David Banner derides the growing criticism as blacks joining America's attack on young black men who are only reflecting the crushing problems within their communities. Besides, he says, that's the kind of music America wants to hear.

"Look at the music that gets us popular — 'Like a Pimp,'," says Banner, naming his hit.

"What makes it so difficult is to know that we need to be doing other things. But the truth is at least us talking about what we're talking about, we can bring certain things to the light," he says. "They want (black artists) to shuck and jive, but they don't want us to tell the real story because they're connected to it."

Criticism of hip-hop is certainly nothing new — it's as much a part of the culture as the beats and rhymes. Among the early accusations were that rap wasn't true music, its lyrics were too raw, its street message too polarizing. But they rarely came from the youthful audience itself, which was enraptured with genre that defined them as none other could.

"As people within the hip-hop generation get older, I think the criticism is increasing," says author Bakari Kitwana, who is currently part of a lecture tour titled "Does Hip-Hop Hate Women?"

"There was a more of a tendency when we were younger to be more defensive of it," he adds.

During her '90s crusade against rap's habit of degrading women, the late black activist C. Dolores Tucker certainly had few allies within the hip-hop community, or even among young black women. Backed by folks like conservative Republican William Bennett, Tucker was vilified within rap circles.

In retrospect, "many of us weren't listening," says Tracy Denean Sharpley-Whiting, a professor at Vanderbilt University and author of the new book "Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Hip-Hop's Hold On Young Black Women."

"She was onto something, but most of us said, 'They're not calling me a bi*ch, they're not talking about me, they're talking about THOSE women.' But then it became clear that, you know what? Those women can be any women."

One rap fan, Bryan Hunt, made the searing documentary "Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes," which debuted on PBS this month. Hunt addresses the biggest criticisms of rap, from its treatment of women to the glorification of the gangsta lifestyle that has become the default posture for many of today's most popular rappers.

"I love hip-hop," Hunt, 36, says in the documentary. "I sometimes feel bad for criticizing hip-hop, but I want to get us men to take a look at ourselves."

Even dances that may seem innocuous are not above the fray. Last summer, as the "Chicken Noodle Soup" song and accompanying dance became a sensation, Baltimore Sun pop critic Rashod D. Ollison mused that the dance — demonstrated in the video by young people stomping wildly from side to side — was part of the growing minstrelization of rap music.

"The music, dances and images in the video are clearly reminiscent of the era when pop culture reduced blacks to caricatures: lazy 'coons,' grinning 'pickaninnies,' s3xually super-charged 'bucks,"' he wrote.

And then there's the criminal aspect that has long been a part of rap. In the '70s, groups may have rapped about drug dealing and street violence, but rap stars weren't the embodiment of criminals themselves. Today, the most popular and successful rappers boast about who has murdered more foes and rhyme about dealing drugs as breezily as other artists sing about love.

Creekmur says music labels have overfed the public on gangsta rap, obscuring artists who represent more positive and varied aspects of black life, like Talib Kweli, Common and Lupe Fiasco.

"It boils down to a complete lack of balance, and whenever there's a complete lack of balance people are going to reject it, whether it's positive or negative," Creekmur says.

Yet Banner says there's a reason why acts like KRS-One and Public Enemy don't sell anymore. He recalled that even his own fans rebuffed positive songs he made — like "Cadillac on 22s," about staying away from street life — in favor of songs like "Like a Pimp."

"The American public had an opportunity to pick what they wanted from David Banner," he says. "I wish America would just be honest. America is sick.... America loves violence and s3x."

152 comments for "Mar 1 - A lot of people are sick of rap???"

 11 years ago '06        #2
servesurite 42 heat pts42
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some of this is true....and to be honest most blame falls on the south, like it or not, i've never seen a whole bunch of n*ggaz who constantly talk bout the same sh*t over and over again.....joc, wayne, jeezy....sh*t gets stale after a while

but theres hope with n*ggaz like mos def, talib, and common....

man i misss the days of the pharcyde and tribe called quest when n*ggaz actually had sh*t to talk bout
 11 years ago '04        #3
mt fuji 17 heat pts17
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before i finish this article let me say this....let me speak on this right here....


"What makes it so difficult is to know that we need to be doing other things. But the truth is at least us talking about what we're talking about, we can bring certain things to the light," he says. "They want (black artists) to shuck and jive, but they don't want us to tell the real story because they're connected to it."


ok dave we already know this,but guess what,u or any other artist talking about the pimps,hustlers,drug dealers and murderers ain't done sh*t for any fu*king community.it damn sure hasn't brought any of us together on a positive note.not more then a few months ago i had a convo wit two of my close friends about how the 80's were worse in nyc as far as crime.and as a whole across the nation people were getting the minds right.but after a long talk wit them i came to realize how UNTRUE THAT sh*t IS.as a people we going down man deeper and deeper.all this thug,killer,mc drug dealer sh*t needs to quit.
 03-01-2007, 07:37 AM         #4
Silver N Black 
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Every Genre is being affected.
 03-01-2007, 07:37 AM         #5
khmerraps 
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good read
 11 years ago '04        #6
mt fuji 17 heat pts17
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 servesurite said:
some of this is true....and to be honest most blame falls on the south, like it or not, i've never seen a whole bunch of n*ggaz who constantly talk bout the same sh*t over and over again.....joc, wayne, jeezy....sh*t gets stale after a while

but theres hope with n*ggaz like mos def, talib, and common....

man i misss the days of the pharcyde and tribe called quest when n*ggaz actually had sh*t to talk bout
man blame the south all u want but this sh*t BEEN going on.so no u can't blame the south.its not just about music man.the south ain't the only ones talking about all this foolishness.the south ain't the only place in the fu*kING world where n*ggas have no respect for life,where n*ggas k!ll each other and sell drugs to they friends mothers.get the fu*k outta here son.

u mentioned mos def well he said some real sh*t in the intro to his 1st album about how n*ggas act like hip hop is some giant in the hills and sh*t.we hip hop n*gga,hip hop is sick cause WE SICK hip hop is dead cause WE DEAD.
 11 years ago '06        #7
CoNNECTICUT 
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blame all the gangsters who talk about all the same sh*t (coke,killing,bi*ches) but cant make a hit record, all they can do is put words together too replicate their lives...sometimes lieing too (most of time). Dont get me wrong its str8 to hear these things but not when everybody in your hood, the next hood over and all over the world say the same sh*t. if you wanna do this, atleast make hit records then make mixtapes about these kind of things.....if not just stay on the block and make ur money and dont rhyme about something everyone else arleady knows about....talent people, wheres the talent? ----thats a mixtape title right there thats whats up
 03-01-2007, 07:58 AM         #8
nehustler 
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Not that I'm sick of Rap Music, but for the first time since I've followed Rap from Rappers Delight till now, I find myself not that excited about the genre anymore. I also find myself asking alot of my peers, is Hip Hop dead, for their opinion, and in my opinion I feel that Hip Hop is dead!
 11 years ago '05        #9
Left Hook 28 heat pts28
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Every contemporary mainstream artist k!lled Hiphop, with the exception of those who can talk about something with creativity and substance other than guns, jewellery and etc.

For example Lupe Fiasco, Nas and Talib Kweli.
 03-01-2007, 08:17 AM         #10
DJT 
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It's a good read, though, strangely enough, nothing new has been stated here...

Even like 13+ years ago when Hip-Hop was getting a stronger "buzz" these sort of articles appeared... This is nothing new at ALL.
 03-01-2007, 08:18 AM         #11
DJT 
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 nehustler said:
Not that I'm sick of Rap Music, but for the first time since I've followed Rap from Rappers Delight till now, I find myself not that excited about the genre anymore. I also find myself asking alot of my peers, is Hip Hop dead, for their opinion, and in my opinion I feel that Hip Hop is dead!
^^^^^^

Props...

I'm the same way... Ever since i started following Hip-Hop, i share the above statement...
 11 years ago '05        #12
DaveDeeSeaTown 
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not gonna speak on it but great read man i propped you!
 11 years ago '05        #13
ANTONIOG77 
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 servesurite said:
some of this is true....and to be honest most blame falls on the south, like it or not, i've never seen a whole bunch of n*ggaz who constantly talk bout the same sh*t over and over again.....joc, wayne, jeezy....sh*t gets stale after a while

but theres hope with n*ggaz like mos def, talib, and common....

man i misss the days of the pharcyde and tribe called quest when n*ggaz actually had sh*t to talk bout
please stop blaming this stuff on the south when there are plenty of northern rappers saying the same crap over and over again also
 03-01-2007, 08:54 AM         #14
r a n c i d 
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I think the sales decline is more to do with people becoming more critical of what they listen to.

You have hip hop fans talking about hip hop is dead, you have pop fans saying pops dead, heavy metal fans saying heavy metals dead, punk fans saying punk is dead, country fans saying country is dead, techno fans saying techno is dead.

Music as a whole is in a decline... The industries been monopolised to much
 03-01-2007, 09:06 AM         #15
StreetPoet617 
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^^ rock and heavy metal cats think their music genre is declining .... this sh*t is worse then i thought...but still what can we do...as long as people stayed concerned with "getting money" then the culture will continue to decline.....i feel like people who do the music come hard enough....but they're subject choice and aggresive nature really fu*k sh*t up......
 11 years ago '04        #16
$tr3tch 
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alot of people have been "sick of rap" for a long a.ss time. I don't listen to any of these new bs artists
 03-01-2007, 09:15 AM         #17
SD-11 
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ya, rap has died down FOR SURE..the only ppl tht kept it real throughtout r nas, talib, mos def, common and a few others...they didnt go mainstream and sold out....thts wht i think is k!lling hip hop...u got little girls buying cd's to music they hear on the radio, then tht artist makes it to the top 5 sales and sh*t, and they claim he is running hip hop, or he gets a grammy, and he is considered todays rap music....like fuk tht...u ain tsee no little girls nuying NAS cd's, or Talib cd's..cause thts wht real rap is...and yes, we can put a lot of the blame the south...there is like 15 atrists who's name start wit lil'_____...

its a fuking pitty to see wht the game has changed too...and for thos etht say" the game is evolving, we need change"..FUK THT...the real hip hop heads liked how the game was before, not how it is now....most of the real hip hop heads still listen to BIG, PAC, NAS, RAKIM, KRS ONE and SCARFACE!!!..cause this new thing yall call "rap" is bullsh*t...is crunk music..its club music...its not "RAP"..cause "RAP" stands for Rythem And Poetry...and in "poetry" u need a meaning and substance...this new music aint got tht....its fukin bullsh*t...

and ya, in the past few years, i grown to like some of this techno sh*t and stuff....still listen to rap and all(its my favourite) but aint no good artists putting out music no more..all my cd'sin my car have older music on it, my cuzin listens to it and is like, "YO, this is old sh*t man, why u bumpin this, u hear the new wayne and jeezy sh*t, here let me put it in for u"...im like"NO, fuk off f*gget, get tht sh*t outta my car...i can hear tht sh*t in the club if i want to listen to it"..i come on boxden to download some music, and it is all covered wit "lil' this, lil' tht"..."young' this, young' tht"...fuking gay man..and yall should get tht new song by nas, its in the download section...its says featuring Jeezy, but its really dissing Jeezy...its a crazy song!!!!!..it speaks about this exact issue.....

good read!!!


Last edited by SD-11; 03-01-2007 at 09:18 AM..
 11 years ago '06        #18
loudobbs 
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HipHop will overcome in 2007
 03-01-2007, 09:29 AM         #19
Snyder 
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anyway if you really are looking for something fresh rejuvenating in hip hop please check my site just give one of my tracks a chance please, if you don't like it, thanks for given a dude a chance. Peace.
 03-01-2007, 09:31 AM         #20
Snyder 
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damn half my message never even made it, anyway sick of rap? eh......well lets just say i haven't been really inspired or motivated in years, i motivate myself by dreaming of what i want to do and just doing it. At least 10 mixtapes by me on dilla beats, just blaze beats, and others will be dropped as im working to get my official LP album released, i have dreams.
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