Miami Hurricanes

most viewed right now
 114
Video inside Have You Ever Met A Real Hitman?
64 comments
@wild'ish
most viewed right now
 98
MMA Ronda Rousey turns off Stephen A. Smith in rousing promo for UFC 207
49 comments
@sports
most viewed right now
 96
Kanye back in the Studio with Pete Rock and a bunch of Nintendo Wii Games
45 comments
@hiphop
most viewed right now
 73
Image(s) inside She Doesn't Skip Ass Day!
89 comments
@thotsdimesetc

section   (0 bx goons and 1 bystanders) Share this on Twitter   Share this on Facebook
 

0 0%
Voters: 0. Sorry, you cannot vote on this poll (Boxden members only)

[Click here to become a member]

Props Slaps
 08-17-2011, 06:07 PM         #9821
The Lefty 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
Also, with the season approaching as quickly as it is, it will be interesting to see how soon the NCAA makes a ruling on the current players who were in the report.

Either way, it's going to be a crazy a.ss season....
 5 years ago '04        #9822
C.R.I.P. 3 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$16,798 | Props total: 1401 1401
Alright fellas, I have backed off the ledge quite a bit. I believe Golden will lead us through these troublesome times and we will actually have a good season.

I all of a sudden don't think this will turn out as bad as it initially seemed. Im thinking somewhere between UNC and Southern Cal.
 5 years ago '04        #9823
C.R.I.P. 3 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$16,798 | Props total: 1401 1401
btw some responses from the accused.


Andrew Johnson

"I never got nothing," Johnson told the Tribune-Review late Tuesday night. "(Shapiro's) name was on the players' lounge. Other than that, I didn't know too much about him. I've seen his face around, but I never had contact with him."

"I can't speak for (my teammates), but on my end that's not true," said Johnson, a West Allegheny a.ssistant coach who owns a beauty supplies store in Aliquippa and is a partner in A&J Ribs in Market Square. "Somebody is just trying to bring down the program."


Kareem Brown- Talked about breaking Fat Moss's legs.
Three Texans starters who played at the University of Miami — receiver Andre Johnson, center Chris Myers and offensive tackle Eric Winston — were critical of the former Hurricanes booster who is at the center of a scandal that could bring down one of college football’s most successful programs.
Johnson accepted drinks and VIP accommodations at Miami-area clubs, according to Nevin Shapiro, a former Hurricanes booster who told Yahoo! Sports he lavished as many as 72 Miami players and coaches with cash, prostitutes, jewelry, travel and parties at his mansions, on his yacht and at local nightclubs.
Johnson didn’t deny knowing Shapiro, who was one of Miami’s most prominent boosters.
“I wasn’t in the clubs too much when I was in college, so I don’t know about that,” Johnson said about Shapiro claiming he hosted Johnson in VIP sections and bought him drinks, a violation of NFL rules. “He knows what happened, and I know what happened. I’m not really worried about it.”
Shapiro, who is in a New Jersey prison for his role in a $930 million Ponzi scheme, also told Yahoo! Sports that between 2002 through 2010 he paid players to attend Miami and, on one occasion, paid for an abortion.
“I don’t know about everybody else,” Johnson said. “I can only speak for myself. The guy’s in trouble, and he’s trying to take everybody down with him. You kind of get upset about it, but at the same time, you can’t control what anybody says.
“It’s over. It’s done with. The NCAA is handling it, and we’ll just move on.”
Johnson said no one connected to the scandal has contacted him. He made it clear, though, he doesn’t like what Shapiro is doing to his college, where he expects to earn his degree next summer.
“I think that’s bad,” he said. “It’s something you don’t want to see.
“Being down there this offseason and working out with so many guys and seeing the team improve and seeing that team on the rise, you hate to see something like this happen.”
Yahoo! Sports had a picture of Johnson posing with Shapiro at the Hurricanes’ 2002 all-sports banquet. Johnson said he took a lot of pictures with a lot of fans while he played at Miami and doesn’t remember that one.
Shapiro also said Texans second-year linebacker Darryl Sharpton partied at one of his mansions and accepted VIP access at clubs, where he also was bought drinks.
Counting veteran defensive lineman Damione Lewis and rookie cornerback Brandon Harris, the Texans have seven players who played for the Hurricanes.
Myers, Winston and backup tackle Rashad Butler played on the same offensive line at Miami. Myers left for the NFL after the 2004 season and was drafted by Denver in 2005.
“To be honest with you, it was a surprise to me,” Myers said about Shapiro’s allegations. “I was there five years. I knew the guy was around, but I didn’t know all that stuff was going on.
“Every story I read is new stuff to me. It’s a shame, but it’s a one-sided story right now. I’m anxious to see how it all pans out. He’s in prison. He can say anything he wants to say. It’s a real shame, dragging down a program right now. There’s always two sides to every story.”
Winston earned All-American recognition with the Hurricanes before the Texans drafted him in the third round in 2006.
“I heard the name (Shapiro), but I didn’t know him, and I couldn’t pick him out of a lineup,” Winston said. “Anytime you have a guy who, obviously, has the character he has and gets that close to the program it’s worrisome.
“Sure, you’re surprised when something like this comes out. It’s unfortunate that a guy like that got as close as he did with the program, but, a lot of colleges are dealing with the same kind of thing.
“It’s unfortunate, but we have to deal with it as a program, as a family and keep pushing forward.”


Read more:
"To me it doesn't matter what's true or what's not true," Rolle said today. "There's nothing for me to comment on this guy. Obviously he's on a rampage to cause havoc, and I'm just going to let him do his talking. Because right now, to me, it's irrelevant. It don't concern me at this point. I'll deal with it when the right time comes."

"You get 20 years in prison, certain things like that happen, you're going to find something to take it on, right?" Rolle said. "I guess we have to bite that bullet."

Rolle said he and other Miami players are not frustrated by the report because "we understood our place, and we also understand what he's trying to do." But Rolle did express concern about how the report will affect Miami.

"Yeah I am concerned, I think this is bringing unnecessary drama to the program that doesn't need to be," Rolle said. "I'm a Miami guy at heart and I always will be a Miami guy at heart. I just want those guys to have the same fortunate career as I had and other people head, and right now there's a lot of drama going on at that school. And it's all caused by one guy. To me, all you can do is just pray for him and I'm just hoping UM comes out OK with this and hoping that they understand that there is no issue."

Rolle said he did not read the report. However, he said his mother called him and said there are photos of Shapiro wearing Rolle's jersey. The ever-confident Rolle didn't blame Shapiro for supporting him.

"I'm like, 'sh** I didn't give him the jersey'," Rolle said. "When I saw him, he switched up jerseys each and every week. I just happened to be the jersey he had on in the Florida State game. He represented me. I played ball down there, he should have represented the No. 6 jersey."
 5 years ago '04        #9824
C.R.I.P. 3 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$16,798 | Props total: 1401 1401
Article by: ERIC OLSON , a.ssociated Press
Updated: August 17, 2011 - 10:28 AM


OMAHA, Neb. - An ex-Nebraska football player alleged to have accepted extra benefits from a former Miami booster acknowledges he was on a yacht owned by Nevin Shapiro ó but not while he was in college.

Benard Thomas' name appeared in a Yahoo! Sports report on allegations by Shapiro, the former booster and convicted Ponzi schemer.

Thomas tells The a.ssociated Press that he and high school teammate D.J. Williams were on the yacht with Shapiro but in 2005, not in 2003 as Shapiro alleges.

Thomas said he was a free agent with the Jacksonville Jaguars at the time and that he had flown to Miami to hang out with Williams. Thomas' last season at Nebraska was 2004. He said he wouldn't have broken NCAA rules while in school.

I think we're gonna make it out of this one.
 08-17-2011, 07:09 PM         #9825
canesin2099 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
Feeling a little better too, but I still expect the hammer to fall on us. We created a team to hate, unfortunately the world enjoys our misfortunes.
 5 years ago '05        #9826
Deeangoe 2 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$12,895 | Props total: 290 290
who the former canes snitching tho

and tyrone moss still has me

in other news, the texans have 7 ex canes

mighta found myself a new nfl team
 5 years ago '04        #9827
C.R.I.P. 3 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$16,798 | Props total: 1401 1401
Robert Marve and Olson Charles were both cleared to play for their schools, despite all the "evidence" on Marve.

As well as the Brown brothers at Kansas St, despite there being receipts with their names on them.
 5 years ago '05        #9828
Deeangoe 2 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$12,895 | Props total: 290 290
lol i just read bryce and arthur sh*t...gotdamn they even have their advisor brian butler in there too
and they got cleared

not tryna jump the gun and make it seem like sh*ts all gravy, but definately better mood than yesterday, even my moms and sisters was asking me why i was all depressed today at morning in breakfast and sh*t, i still expect some sort of punishment, but a sigh of relief for now
 5 years ago '07        #9829
ttime236 38 heat pts38
space
avatar space
space
$10,135 | Props total: 8 8
 Deeangoe said:
lol i just read bryce and arthur sh*t...gotdamn they even have their advisor brian butler in there too
and they got cleared

not tryna jump the gun and make it seem like sh*ts all gravy, but definately better mood than yesterday, even my moms and sisters was asking me why i was all depressed today at morning in breakfast and sh*t, i still expect some sort of punishment, but a sigh of relief for now
Lmao, I was sittin in class all day just thinkin of the hammer the ncaa boutta lay down. People askin me whats up, Im just like

Its encouraging tho reading some of the new stuff today. Question I got is will Golden sit the guys?? so we arent further ingelible. And also when do yall expect the ncaa to actually make a move?? i read that usc investigation took 4 fu*king years before they handed out any punishment
 5 years ago '07        #9830
Kinglew88 13 heat pts13
space
avatar space
space
$13,226 | Props total: 466 466
 ttime236 said:
Lmao, I was sittin in class all day just thinkin of the hammer the ncaa boutta lay down. People askin me whats up, Im just like

Its encouraging tho reading some of the new stuff today. Question I got is will Golden sit the guys?? so we arent further ingelible. And also when do yall expect the ncaa to actually make a move?? i read that usc investigation took 4 fu*king years before they handed out any punishment
usc didnt cooperate with the NCAA

which in the end made they punishment worse.....
 5 years ago '04        #9831
C.R.I.P. 3 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$16,798 | Props total: 1401 1401
My n*gga Dedrick Epps is stepping up for the family.




One person named in the Yahoo! Sports report against the University of Miami claims former booster Nevin Shapiro attempted to extort money from players.

The player, speaking on the condition of anonymity, denied accepting gifts during his UM career and said Shapiro is trying to blackmail players. Shapiro is serving a 20-year prison term for his role in a $930 million Ponzi scheme.

"This dude was a felon," the player said. "He was a schemer."

Shapiro alleges in the article he provided improper benefits such as cash, prostitutes and meals at high-end restaurants for at least 72 athletes from 2002-2010. The former player, now in the NFL, said he began hearing from Shapiro once he was incarcerated last year. Letters started showing up from Shapiro at his locker, and he also received phone calls from attorneys who claimed to represent the former booster.

Text alerts: Get Miami Hurricanes news on your phone

According to the player, someone called on Shapiro's behalf and asked if he wanted to "buy the story off him" or else face the allegations. He said he felt Shapiro was trying to "extort" money from those players he felt he built relationships with over the years.

"He tried to get me to send him money," the player said. "He wrote me a letter. There's a letter on my locker from Nevin Shapiro and he's making threats … People were calling me trying to extort money."

Yahoo! Sports reported Shapiro had a strong presence at the program since the early portion of the decade, but the player said he appeared less frequently as coach Randy Shannon's tenure progressed. Shannon replaced Larry Coker after the 2006 season.

"Everybody knew to stay away from that guy," the player said. "Coach Shannon hated him. He told us to stay away from that guy. [Shapiro] hated coach Shannon. That why he wasn't around the program like he was earlier."
 08-17-2011, 08:55 PM         #9832
The Lefty 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
FYI, Cane fam:

Don't educate yourself on this subject and what has happened in the past with teams like this, you'll just be seen as a SEC hater and biased on this board.

Just a heads up.
 5 years ago '06        #9833
FullTimeHustla 11 heat pts11
space
space
space
$1,642 | Props total: 1 1
Stefon Diggs
I leaned always look at the bigger picture my time will come. When I have nice cars and ima be icey.. Ear rings all that lol . But you just gotta discipline yourself .. That's all , idc bout violations one person mistakes doesn't speak on behalf of the school.
he just posted this
 5 years ago '05        #9834
CO Butta 4 heat pts
space
space
space
$6,394 | Props total: 1 1
Big d!ck Jimbo said none of your recruits could even make our team.. but we might take one or two just because and grey shirt them..
 5 years ago '05        #9835
dipset kid0221 1 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$4,190 | Props total: 8 8
A Huge Scandal, but Probably Not the Harshest Penalties
By PETE THAMEL

As college sports officials confront yet another cheating scandal — this one involving Miami, the latest in a conga line of blue-chip programs that have recently stumbled into the crosshairs of N.C.A.A. investigators — speculation over the extent of the fallout intensified Wednesday. Questions were raised about the status of current players, former coaches and even administrators, including Donna Shalala, the university president.

A Yahoo Sports report on Tuesday implicated 72 athletes. They are accused of taking hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, gifts, meals, even the services of prostitutes, from Nevin Shapiro, a booster now incarcerated for his role in a $900 million Ponzi scheme. There appears to be little doubt that the severity and breadth of the claims against Miami’s athletics program are worse than what peers like Ohio State, North Carolina, Tennessee, Oregon and Louisiana State encountered in recent months.

But Julie Roe Lach, the N.C.A.A.’s vice president for enforcement, said in an interview Wednesday that there had been little discussion about reviving harsh penalties like television bans or the so-called death penalty, two punishments once used by the N.C.A.A. that have long been shelved.

The N.C.A.A., which has been investigating Miami since March, continues to try to bolster enforcement, but it does so against a backdrop of television contracts in the billions and some coaching salaries that eclipse $5 million.

“There isn’t a public outcry to do something about a system that is so terribly broken,” said J. Brent Clark, a former N.C.A.A. investigator who is now a lawyer in Oklahoma City. “The game is too popular and the money is too big.”

One veteran compliance official, who requested anonymity because he was not permitted to speak publicly about Miami’s case, said that if the N.C.A.A. upheld the findings in the Yahoo report, it would be the most significant case he had seen. He said the most critical element of the report was that it appeared that coaches and administrators were aware of what Shapiro was doing and did nothing about it.

He said that would put it on the same level as the N.C.A.A.’s recent case against Southern California, but at a far greater extent. The N.C.A.A. docked U.S.C. 30 football scholarships and issued a two-year postseason ban. U.S.C. Coach Lane Kiffin recently said the program would not recover for about seven years.

“It would seem that this could set the program back light-years,” the compliance official said of Miami.

The N.C.A.A acknowledged the severity of Miami’s situation by issuing a statement, something it rarely does while an investigation is under way. Along with confirming that it had been investigating Miami for five months, Mark Emmert, the N.C.A.A. president, also provided some perspective.

“If the a.ssertions are true, the alleged conduct at the University of Miami is an illustration of the need for serious and fundamental change in many critical aspects of college sports,” Emmert said. “This pertains especially to the involvement of boosters and agents with student-athletes.”

But the N.C.A.A. is not expected to revive some of its old punishments. No major program has received a television ban since 1996, and no program has received the so-called death penalty since the N.C.A.A. barred Southern Methodist from playing in 1987.

Roe Lach, who was not permitted to speak directly about the Miami situation or any other active cases, said her conversations about penalties steered more toward suspensions of coaches and postseason bans for programs.

“I have not heard it turn much to television bans or the death penalty,” she said. “The majority of the ideas or support I keep hearing relate toward suspensions or postseason bans being the most powerful.”

With the N.C.A.A. most likely in the early stages of its investigation of Miami, it is difficult to predict what investigators will find. It is apparent, however, that the N.C.A.A.’s four-year statute of limitations will probably not come into play for violations at Miami, since the Yahoo Sports report said the improprieties were from 2002 through 2010.

Roe Lach, speaking generally, said that exceptions to the statute of limitations include “willful pattern of conduct” and “blatant disregard for some fundamental rule,” both of which would appear to apply in the Miami case.

David Swank, a former chairman of the N.C.A.A. Committee on Infractions, said he did not consider the death penalty or a television ban as applicable punishments in college sports today. He said that the death penalty “destroys a program” and that a television ban hurts too many other universities.

“The problem with a television ban is that you penalize a conference of which they are a member, and you penalize all the schools that have contracts with them,” he said.

But North Carolina’s president emeritus, William Friday, said he was in favor of stronger penalties, even if they hurt U.N.C., which recently fired its football coach, Butch Davis, in the wake of a scandal.

“Nobody is in charge,” he said. “The power of the money in this has validated that. I don’t think anyone is in charge right now.”

Shalala, who served as secretary of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton, said in a statement Wednesday that she was “upset, disheartened and saddened” by the allegations. Yahoo Sports published a photograph of Shalala taking a donor check from Shapiro.

Al Golden, in his first season as Miami’s football coach, has 12 players, including 10 potential starters, ensnared in the scandal. Golden said Wednesday that when he took the job in December he was not informed of any problems. He said all of Miami’s players would continue to practice until he hears otherwise from the university or the N.C.A.A.

The tentacles of the case may spread beyond Miami, with some former Hurricanes coaches implicated in the article now at Missouri, Louisville, Western Kentucky, Florida, Marshall and Alabama. The N.C.A.A. will continue to face criticism on how it handles its cases.

“I don’t believe the system will fix itself,” Clark said. “The colleges and the N.C.A.A. have no great motive because of the income that they receive.”
 5 years ago '05        #9836
dipset kid0221 1 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$4,190 | Props total: 8 8
NCAABob BOB WILLIAMS
death penalty hype is out of control. After investigation, if merited, COI sets penalties, not NCAA staff. Learn more: bit.ly/r84cEa
29 minutes ago
Don't know if this is his real account but shares some info
 5 years ago '08        #9837
FSU_CANE561 
space
avatar space
space
$399 | Props total: 3 3
This is a great read from a former walk-on. just thought i'd share

 08-18-2011, 04:10 PM         #9838
canesin2099 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
 FSU_CANE561 said:
This is a great read from a former walk-on. just thought i'd share

Former University of Miami offensive lineman Adam Bates wrote this in regards to the NCAA amid the investigation regarding UM. Bates, who hails from Deer Creek, Oklahoma, was a walk-on at UM from 2003-05. He received a B.A degree in Political Science at the University of Miami and a law degree and Master's in Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Michigan.


I want to talk about the hypocrisy of the NCAA and, by extension, its constituent school administrations; the very people that have enriched themselves so shamelessly on the backs of the kids theyíre soon to righteously delight in punishing.

First, a little background: I had it easy at the University of Miami, and it often felt like it was too much to bear. I had an easier time in class than most of my teammates, and far less was expected of me on the football field. I went to school on academic money and I played football because I wanted to and because I had played my whole life, not because it was the only way for me to get through school or make a better life for myself and my family. I canít speak about what itís like to be a high profile recruit, an All-American, or a future NFL star and the pressures such statuses entail. But I can tell you this: college football is a grind.

The NCAA says players put in twenty hours a week. Anybody who has spent any time around a college program knows that sixty is a better number. Then add twelve to fifteen hours a week of class on top of that. Seventy-five hours a week, in exchange for a stipend mathematically designed to make your ends almost meet.

The president of the NCAA makes more than $1 million a year. Any head coach worth his salt is making two or three times that. Talking heads at ESPN/ABC/CBS and the presidents of most major institutions join them in the seven digit salary club.

Thatís what this is really about, and people have to understand that. Why is it a problem for AJ Green to sell his jersey when the NCAA sells 22 variations of the very same jersey? Why canít Terrelle Pryor get some free ink from a fan? Why donít people react the same way to that as they do to hearing that Peyton Manning is selling phones for Sprint or that Tiger Woods gets paid $100m to wear Nike gear? Whatís the difference?

The difference, as far as I can tell, is that the NCAA has done a wonderful job duping people into believing this multi-billion dollar a year industry is pursued for the sake of amateurism. Itís a total sham. The coaches arenít amateurs, the administrators arenít amateurs, the corporate sponsors and media companies that make hundreds of millions of dollars a year on the backs of these players arenít amateurs. The only "amateursĒ involved are the guys doing all the work. Pretty nice racket if you can get it.

The NCAA and ESPN are going to be telling you that some great kids are scumbags because they allegedly broke rules designed to keep them poor and implemented by people making money hand over fist. An ESPN shill in a $5,000 suit is going to ask you to morally condemn the kids who provide the framework for said shill to make enough money to afford that suit because those kids might have taken some free food and drinks. They're going to be called "cheaters" despite the obvious fact that boat trips don't make you run any faster or hit any harder.

Oklahoma gives Bob Stoops $3 million a year and nobody blinks. A car dealership in Norman gives Rhett Bomar a couple hundred bucks and everyone wets themselves. Urban Meyer sat on TV this very day, making approximately $1,500 an hour to sit there and flap his lips, and was asked to judge a bunch of 20 year old kids for allegedly accepting free food and drinks and party invites.

Is that immense delusion intentional or do people actually not realize the hypocrisy they perpetuate?

Whatís that you say? The rules are the rules? I call b.s.. When the rules are propagated by the very same people theyíre designed to benefit, I say the rules must be independently justifiable. What is the justification for saying that AJ Green canít sell his jersey? That he wonít be an ďamateurĒ anymore? Doesnít the scholarship itself render him no longer an amateur by any objective definition? Doesnít the fact that Georgia spent hundreds of millions of dollars advertising itself to AJ Green render him no longer an amateur? Doesnít he stop being an amateur when UGA promises him that his career at Georgia will net him NFL millions? Doesnít the fact that millions of dollars change hands thanks to the service he provides make him not an amateur?

Is it because athletes should be treated like other students, lest they not appreciate the ďcollege experience?Ē Other kids get to sell their belongings, donít they? They get to go to parties and drink and throw themselves at women, donít they? They get to have jobs and earn their worth, donít they? And other kids don't spend sixty hours a week having their bodies broken or their spring mornings running themselves to death in the dew in the dark.

Itís nonsense. Unmitigated, indefensible nonsense. The players are ďamateursĒ for the simple reason that theyíre cheaper to employ that way. What is bad about giving a poor kid some money to spend? What is wrong with showing your appreciation for the service someone provides by giving them some benefit of their own? Iím supposed to believe itís wrong because the NCAA says it is?

These players are worth far more than a free trip to the strip club and a trip around the bay on a yacht. AJ Green is worth more to the NCAA and the University of Georgia than the cost of his jersey, and Terrelle Pryor is worth more than the value of a tattoo.

I donít know much about players taking ďillegal benefits,Ē and if I did I wouldnít be snitching about it like a lowlife, but I can tell you this: I hope to the bottom of my soul that every player in America is on the take, because theyíre getting shafted. The powers that be make too much money this way to ever change, and the rest of the country seems far too committed to delusions, institutional partisanship, and jealousy to see their own glass houses, so take what you can get while you can get it, youngbloods. You earned it.
 5 years ago '04        #9839
Cap Peeler 7 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$12,861 | Props total: 0 0
 canesin2099 said:
Former University of Miami offensive lineman Adam Bates wrote this in regards to the NCAA amid the investigation regarding UM. Bates, who hails from Deer Creek, Oklahoma, was a walk-on at UM from 2003-05. He received a B.A degree in Political Science at the University of Miami and a law degree and Master's in Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Michigan.


I want to talk about the hypocrisy of the NCAA and, by extension, its constituent school administrations; the very people that have enriched themselves so shamelessly on the backs of the kids theyíre soon to righteously delight in punishing.

First, a little background: I had it easy at the University of Miami, and it often felt like it was too much to bear. I had an easier time in class than most of my teammates, and far less was expected of me on the football field. I went to school on academic money and I played football because I wanted to and because I had played my whole life, not because it was the only way for me to get through school or make a better life for myself and my family. I canít speak about what itís like to be a high profile recruit, an All-American, or a future NFL star and the pressures such statuses entail. But I can tell you this: college football is a grind.

The NCAA says players put in twenty hours a week. Anybody who has spent any time around a college program knows that sixty is a better number. Then add twelve to fifteen hours a week of class on top of that. Seventy-five hours a week, in exchange for a stipend mathematically designed to make your ends almost meet.

The president of the NCAA makes more than $1 million a year. Any head coach worth his salt is making two or three times that. Talking heads at ESPN/ABC/CBS and the presidents of most major institutions join them in the seven digit salary club.

Thatís what this is really about, and people have to understand that. Why is it a problem for AJ Green to sell his jersey when the NCAA sells 22 variations of the very same jersey? Why canít Terrelle Pryor get some free ink from a fan? Why donít people react the same way to that as they do to hearing that Peyton Manning is selling phones for Sprint or that Tiger Woods gets paid $100m to wear Nike gear? Whatís the difference?

The difference, as far as I can tell, is that the NCAA has done a wonderful job duping people into believing this multi-billion dollar a year industry is pursued for the sake of amateurism. Itís a total sham. The coaches arenít amateurs, the administrators arenít amateurs, the corporate sponsors and media companies that make hundreds of millions of dollars a year on the backs of these players arenít amateurs. The only "amateursĒ involved are the guys doing all the work. Pretty nice racket if you can get it.

The NCAA and ESPN are going to be telling you that some great kids are scumbags because they allegedly broke rules designed to keep them poor and implemented by people making money hand over fist. An ESPN shill in a $5,000 suit is going to ask you to morally condemn the kids who provide the framework for said shill to make enough money to afford that suit because those kids might have taken some free food and drinks. They're going to be called "cheaters" despite the obvious fact that boat trips don't make you run any faster or hit any harder.

Oklahoma gives Bob Stoops $3 million a year and nobody blinks. A car dealership in Norman gives Rhett Bomar a couple hundred bucks and everyone wets themselves. Urban Meyer sat on TV this very day, making approximately $1,500 an hour to sit there and flap his lips, and was asked to judge a bunch of 20 year old kids for allegedly accepting free food and drinks and party invites.

Is that immense delusion intentional or do people actually not realize the hypocrisy they perpetuate?

Whatís that you say? The rules are the rules? I call b.s.. When the rules are propagated by the very same people theyíre designed to benefit, I say the rules must be independently justifiable. What is the justification for saying that AJ Green canít sell his jersey? That he wonít be an ďamateurĒ anymore? Doesnít the scholarship itself render him no longer an amateur by any objective definition? Doesnít the fact that Georgia spent hundreds of millions of dollars advertising itself to AJ Green render him no longer an amateur? Doesnít he stop being an amateur when UGA promises him that his career at Georgia will net him NFL millions? Doesnít the fact that millions of dollars change hands thanks to the service he provides make him not an amateur?

Is it because athletes should be treated like other students, lest they not appreciate the ďcollege experience?Ē Other kids get to sell their belongings, donít they? They get to go to parties and drink and throw themselves at women, donít they? They get to have jobs and earn their worth, donít they? And other kids don't spend sixty hours a week having their bodies broken or their spring mornings running themselves to death in the dew in the dark.

Itís nonsense. Unmitigated, indefensible nonsense. The players are ďamateursĒ for the simple reason that theyíre cheaper to employ that way. What is bad about giving a poor kid some money to spend? What is wrong with showing your appreciation for the service someone provides by giving them some benefit of their own? Iím supposed to believe itís wrong because the NCAA says it is?

These players are worth far more than a free trip to the strip club and a trip around the bay on a yacht. AJ Green is worth more to the NCAA and the University of Georgia than the cost of his jersey, and Terrelle Pryor is worth more than the value of a tattoo.

I donít know much about players taking ďillegal benefits,Ē and if I did I wouldnít be snitching about it like a lowlife, but I can tell you this: I hope to the bottom of my soul that every player in America is on the take, because theyíre getting shafted. The powers that be make too much money this way to ever change, and the rest of the country seems far too committed to delusions, institutional partisanship, and jealousy to see their own glass houses, so take what you can get while you can get it, youngbloods. You earned it.
:agreement6::agreement6::agreement6::agreement6:
 5 years ago '04        #9840
C.R.I.P. 3 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$16,798 | Props total: 1401 1401
Man I feel like all the hate is empowering me right now and I feel really good about our chances and beating this. Just as one big fu*k you to everybody.
Home      
  
 

 






most viewed right now
 36
J Prince really think he a godfather
182 comments
1 day ago
@hiphop
most viewed right now
 35
Image(s) inside If you like women, you'll LIKE this thread. If you like men, SLAP this..
64 comments
22 hours ago
@thotsdimesetc
most viewed right now
 30
Video inside im going to FAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i dont care anymore
48 comments
1 day ago
@thotsdimesetc
most viewed right now
 23
is there any bigger simp in film history?
269 comments
20 hours ago
@movies
most viewed right now
 22
Video inside Detriot Rapper TeamEastside Peezy locked up on Federal Racketeering cha..
110 comments
1 day ago
@hiphop
most viewed right now
 15
Video inside Nintendo shows off Super Mario Run & Nintendo Switch on Tonight Show
55 comments
21 hours ago
@games
most viewed right now
 14
Video inside SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING Trailer Teaser
87 comments
1 day ago
@movies
most viewed right now
 13
Video inside Air Jordan 11 Space Jam On Feet
31 comments
20 hours ago
@gear
back to top
register contact Follow BX @ Twitter Follow BX @ Facebook search BX privacy