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Bonds Hit 715.... White People Mad As Hell Right Now


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Props Slaps
 05-30-2006, 10:02 PM         #201
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 ill800 said
why do you repeat the same things instead of gettin at the meat and potatoes of what i said? i didnt say your avy was racist nor your sig. i put the entire equation of you together, and you actually come off as a bit racist. thats why i said i understand having black pride but dont be blinded. so now please tell me how white people dont know what racism is ?

LMAOO at you running from my Q

What about my signature and AVY is racist

to white people?

seems like your saying that to say it.... then say black pride is blinding me

So is my avy saying black pride or is it racist

and if it is racist

how are the sig and avy racist???????????????????????

to white people?!?!

white people dont know what racism is... you cant even explain this to me but u say it

elementry

 05-30-2006, 10:03 PM         #202
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 ill800 said
no, youre racist. not your avy. grow up, you obviously on the young side.

you just tied my avy into being racist

MAKE UP YOUR MIND!!!!!!!! OR CLOSE THE MOUTH ... your saying it

and if im racist explain how?

 05-30-2006, 10:07 PM         #203
ill800  OP
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can you read, seriously? do you lack the ability to read and process information and understand it? looks like somebody is gettin added to my coveted ignore list. congratulations, youre inability to debate your beliefs and lack of critical thought, reading and reason qualify you to be the next BX moron added. i will waste no more time on you and your silly posts. i hope one day you realize how close minded you are and wake up.

 05-30-2006, 10:08 PM         #204
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 StudiosConnect. said
you just tied my avy into being racist

MAKE UP YOUR MIND!!!!!!!! OR CLOSE THE MOUTH ... your saying it

and if im racist explain how?

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

saying my avy and sig makes me racist does not explain how im racist when u turn around and say its not racist but black pride


 05-30-2006, 10:09 PM         #205
ill800  OP
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and then you go and give me hate for exposing you. you are a wild jungle homo AND a racist, let me correct myself.

 05-30-2006, 10:13 PM         #206
ill800  OP
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if i type in all caps and in 10 font, then will you understand? reread what I posted. i dont owe you an explanation.

 05-30-2006, 10:19 PM         #207
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 ill800 said
if i type in all caps and in 10 font, then will you understand? reread what I posted. i dont owe you an explanation.

another whiteboy

who calls me a racist

But cant even explain why.... you explain'd why but then said the reason I am a "Racist" is for being proud of black

So how am I practice'n racism against white people

u claim my avy is racist

u claimed my sig is racist

why is it on boxden I'd be banned by now

 05-30-2006, 10:19 PM         #208
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 ill800 said
and then you go and give me hate for exposing you. you are a wild jungle homo AND a racist, let me correct myself.

White Male that was not very nice of you to say

But I forgive you :rolleyes:

 05-30-2006, 10:20 PM         #209
ill800  OP
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This message is hidden because StudiosConnect. is on your ignore list.

talk to the hand, bi*ch!

 05-30-2006, 10:22 PM         #210
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 ill800 said
This message is hidden because StudiosConnect. is on your ignore list.

talk to the hand, bi*ch!

ok white male :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

another one mad



 05-30-2006, 10:24 PM         #211
ill800  OP
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This message is hidden because StudiosConnect. is on your ignore list.


you mad?

 05-30-2006, 10:24 PM         #212
Tempus  OP
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 StudiosConnect. said
ok white male :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

another one mad


Why do you get satifation out of somebody being mad. Thats kinda childish aint it

 05-30-2006, 10:33 PM         #213
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 Tempus said
Why do you get satifation out of somebody being mad. Thats kinda childish aint it

who said i got satisfaction

stop putting words in my mouth

( like calling me a racist and a person that hated white people)

just proves my point he can say all this about me but has no reason to prove why... sad

 05-30-2006, 10:33 PM         #214
ill800  OP
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im actually glad that youre on my ignore list now, where you belong.
refer to page 14 post # 205 in this thread for any and all my replies to w/e you have to say from this point on.

 05-30-2006, 10:35 PM         #215
Tempus  OP
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 StudiosConnect. said
who said i got satisfaction

stop putting words in my mouth

( like calling me a racist and a person that hated white people)

just proves my point he can say all this about me but has no reason to prove why... sad
Another one mad then you started laughing.

 05-30-2006, 10:49 PM         #216
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 Tempus said
Another one mad then you started laughing.

hush carlton ur not making sense

 05-30-2006, 10:54 PM         #217
Tempus  OP
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 StudiosConnect. said
hush carlton ur not making sense
nuff said. im done with u

 05-30-2006, 11:05 PM         #218
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 Tempus said
nuff said. im done with u

good bye carlton

 12 years ago '05        #219
justindlawson 2 heat pts
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why would color matter? he is a cheater..if anything a disgrace to black athletes...so now whites are laughing?

 05-30-2006, 11:13 PM         #220
StudiosConnect.  OP
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 justindlawson said
why would color matter? he is a cheater..if anything a disgrace to black athletes...so now whites are laughing?
Barry Bonds has hit home run No. 715, passing "The Sultan of Swat" and taking sole possession of second place on the all-time list. Now he continues his pursuit of Hank Aaron and No. 756 -- the most important record in professional sports.

Congratulations. Sincerely, congratulations. Frankly, the hysteria displayed by both the fans and the media over Bonds' pursuit of the The Babe's and Hammerin' Hank's magical numbers has been truly revolting.

Hank Aaron
AP Photo
Hank Aaron also holds the major-league record for RBI (2,297) and was named to 24 All-Star squads.

Regardless of what Bonds has done, regardless of whether he cheated to achieve the record, regardless of whatever performance-enhancing drugs he might have ingested or injected, the past few weeks have been as close to a witch hunt as America has seen since Salem, Mass., was a member of the colonial big leagues in the 17th century.

Whether Bonds can catch Aaron is an open question. In either case, under normal circumstances, whether Bonds hits 756 home runs or retires a little short of that mark, his legacy will be secure.

Needless to say, however, these are not normal times. Pundits and politicians alike have been grandstanding on the issue, with some calling for an asterisk next to Bonds' records and his statistics. Others go much further, fanatically demanding that Bonds and his controversial numbers be stricken completely from the record books in some illogical attempt to rewrite history.

As the editor of "The 2006 ESPN Baseball Encyclopedia" -- the only up-to-date, in-print encyclopedia that covers all of baseball history -- I have more than a passing interest in this controversy. And I have one thing to say to everyone who wants to treat Bonds' records differently from the myriad other records in our book or in any other baseball book:

Enough is enough.

The outcry against Bonds and his records should seem just plain silly when viewed in the context of baseball history. Bonds' "record" is no more "tainted" than many -- if not most -- of the great records in baseball history. And while Bonds enjoyed several significant advantages on the way to 715, so did every other great home run hitter.

Babe Ruth had the incalculable advantage of playing his whole career during a segregated era, when he and every other white hitter didn't have to face great black pitchers such as Smokey Joe Williams, Bullet Joe Rogan and Satchel Paige. Nor have their batting statistics compared to legendary blackball sluggers such as Josh Gibson, who many feel might have broken Ruth's single-season home run record. Ruth also enjoyed playing all of his games during the daytime while having to travel no further west than St. Louis and no further south than Washington, D.C. Furthermore, Ruth didn't have to face the fresh arms and blazing fastballs of the great relief pitchers who would intimidate so many hitters decades later.

Hank Aaron benefited from hitting in the many cozy neighborhood ballparks still in use in the 1950s and 1960s, just like contemporary sluggers have benefited from playing in the retro ballparks. Though Aaron's home parks in Milwaukee and Atlanta were not neighborhood parks, he did play in Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium when it was known as the "Launching Pad," giving him an overall home-park advantage for his career. Aaron took advantage of the newly implemented designated hitter rule at the end of his career, adding 22 home runs to the lead he had over Ruth. And, paradoxically enough, the great Henry Aaron also benefited from a lack of true integration in the game, as the level of discrimination in baseball meant that it was extremely slow to allow African-American pitchers to play a prominent role -- even as great black hitters such as Aaron, Willie Mays and Roy Campanella were knocking the stuffing out of the ball. Finally, Aaron played much of his career in an era when offense dominated in the NL, just like Bonds during the so-called "steroids era."

None of the above takes anything away from the greatness of Aaron, Ruth or Bonds. All players play in the era that they were born into, and all of them play with significant advantages and some disadvantages. As one might expect, great records tend to be set during years and eras when the natural advantages point in a particular way, aiding one group of players while simultaneously penalizing others.

Perceptions of baseball history are slippery, especially for those who have gone around the bend over the usage of steroids and the offensive explosion of the 1990s and early 2000s. Consider these facts for a moment. The top-scoring decade in modern NL history (i.e., since 1901) was from 1921 through '30 with 9.8 runs per game. From 1991 through 2003, NL scoring was 9.2 runs per game. Forget steroids, what kind of performance enhancers were those guys using in the 1920s?

The American League saw 10.4 runs scored per game during 1931-1940, a modern high for a league. That mark still stands, even after the offensive peak of 1991-2000 (AL: 9.9) and even when counting 2001-03 before testing as a "decade" (AL: 9.7). Yet when AL scoring hit exactly that same average with 10.4 runs per game in 1999, the hue and cry about how "arena baseball" had made a mockery of the game was unbelievable.

From 1951 through '60, NL hitters slammed 1.8 home runs per game, barely different from the 1.9 per game hit from 1991 through 2000. What was the hidden secret, other than the prodigious talent of the great sluggers such as Aaron and Mays?

So all of the hand-wringing over the integrity of baseball's records boils down to this: During 1991-2003, home runs were hit at a rate higher than ever before, and some of that increase had to do with performance-enhancing drugs. Big deal. The common belief that the new steroid-testing regimen of 2004 caused offense and home runs to drop is a fallacy. The fact is that scoring and home runs both peaked in 2000 and had dropped approximately 8 percent in the following three years.

Steroids were only one part of the offensive equation, and probably not the most important element. There were several other major reasons and a dozen minor factors that also contributed to the barrage of long balls. Furthermore, all steroid usage was not against the rules, depending on the year in question and the drugs taken. And even when it was, MLB deliberately chose to look the other way when the game needed to bring back the fans and the record-setting rules-breakers were packing ballparks.

So if the "blame" for the home run binge can't be laid upon steroids, then why the outrage? Because using steroids was cheating? C'mon. Really? Cheating has been part of major league baseball since the beginning, and a review of baseball history indicates that pitchers have been far bigger cheaters than hitters for most of that time. Cooperstown is full of pitchers who cheated for decades; let's get a retired U.S. senator to investigate their careers.

Many older baseball fans fondly remember the great 1968 season, when Hall of Famer Bob Gibson seemed invincible -- at least until he faced the Detroit Tigers in Game 7 of the World Series. Gibson posted an unbelievable 1.12 ERA that year, going 22-9 with 28 complete games and hurling 13 shutouts. (Gibson's ERA is widely, though erroneously, believed to be the best in modern history.) In response to the dearth of offense after that "great" season, baseball owners lowered the height of the pitching mound from 15 to 10 inches.

[Barry Bonds] is not a perfect person, nor has his career been without controversy. As such, he fits perfectly into the imperfect history of the national pastime.

In a recent panel discussion about steroids and Barry Bonds, hosted by Bob Costas on HBO, Gibson complained about that rule change, calling it "illegal" and implying that all batting records set after 1968 were suspect. Gibson conveniently failed to mention, however, that his career season was possible only because those same owners had made another rule change in 1963, when they enlarged the strike zone from the armpits to the top of the shoulders. Giving this huge advantage to pitchers in a high-strike environment immediately caused scoring to drop 15 percent to deadball-era levels in the National League.

In 1968, Gibson enjoyed pitching in a league in which offense was lower than at any time since 1908. Why hasn't that made the pitching records set during the mid-1960s suspect? Or "illegal," to adopt Gibson's standard?

Let's take another prominent example: Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak. It is often cited as the paradigm of an unimpeachable record by those who feel that the integrity of all home run records has now been destroyed. Did you know that DiMaggio's legendary streak was prolonged by a highly unusual stratagem, employed solely to help preserve the streak? In the bottom of the eighth inning of Game 38, with a runner on base and one out and New York leading by two runs, Yankees slugger Tommy Henrich laid down a sacrifice bunt. Why? To avoid hitting into an inning-ending double play with the hitless-on-the-day DiMaggio on deck.

Henrich hit 31 home runs that year, sacrificing only seven other times and grounding into only six DPs. He never would have laid down that bunt if not to guarantee DiMaggio would get another chance to extend the streak. Does that call into question the integrity of that record?

Barry Bonds is unquestionably one of the greatest players ever to play the game. He is also one of the greatest home run hitters in history. He will end up holding many important records. He is not a perfect person, nor has his career been without controversy. As such, he fits perfectly into the imperfect history of the national pastime.

Enough is enough.

 05-31-2006, 01:22 AM         #221
1angrypinoy  OP
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I don't care if Bonds took steroids or not 'cause steriods didn't/doesn't
help him see the ball. If Bonds did take steroids most of MLB
players probably were/are taking it the same as Bonds, so this evens
things out. What separates Bonds is his skill level at being able to
make contact with the ball.

Anyway, people forget that the 1994 season was cancelled. If that didn't
happen, Bonds would most likely have already passed Aaron.

 12 years ago '04        #222
Gtownkid04 
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 StudiosConnect. said

Regardless of what Bonds has done, regardless of whether he cheated to achieve the record, regardless of whatever performance-enhancing drugs he might have ingested or injected, the past few weeks have been as close to a witch hunt as America has seen since Salem, Mass., was a member of the colonial big leagues in the 17th century.

Whether Bonds can catch Aaron is an open question. In either case, under normal circumstances, whether Bonds hits 756 home runs or retires a little short of that mark, his legacy will be secure.

Needless to say, however, these are not normal times. Pundits and politicians alike have been grandstanding on the issue, with some calling for an asterisk next to Bonds' records and his statistics. Others go much further, fanatically demanding that Bonds and his controversial numbers be stricken completely from the record books in some illogical attempt to rewrite history.

As the editor of "The 2006 ESPN Baseball Encyclopedia" -- the only up-to-date, in-print encyclopedia that covers all of baseball history -- I have more than a passing interest in this controversy. And I have one thing to say to everyone who wants to treat Bonds' records differently from the myriad other records in our book or in any other baseball book:

Enough is enough.

The outcry against Bonds and his records should seem just plain silly when viewed in the context of baseball history. Bonds' "record" is no more "tainted" than many -- if not most -- of the great records in baseball history. And while Bonds enjoyed several significant advantages on the way to 715, so did every other great home run hitter.

Babe Ruth had the incalculable advantage of playing his whole career during a segregated era, when he and every other white hitter didn't have to face great black pitchers such as Smokey Joe Williams, Bullet Joe Rogan and Satchel Paige. Nor have their batting statistics compared to legendary blackball sluggers such as Josh Gibson, who many feel might have broken Ruth's single-season home run record. Ruth also enjoyed playing all of his games during the daytime while having to travel no further west than St. Louis and no further south than Washington, D.C. Furthermore, Ruth didn't have to face the fresh arms and blazing fastballs of the great relief pitchers who would intimidate so many hitters decades later.

Hank Aaron benefited from hitting in the many cozy neighborhood ballparks still in use in the 1950s and 1960s, just like contemporary sluggers have benefited from playing in the retro ballparks. Though Aaron's home parks in Milwaukee and Atlanta were not neighborhood parks, he did play in Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium when it was known as the "Launching Pad," giving him an overall home-park advantage for his career. Aaron took advantage of the newly implemented designated hitter rule at the end of his career, adding 22 home runs to the lead he had over Ruth. And, paradoxically enough, the great Henry Aaron also benefited from a lack of true integration in the game, as the level of discrimination in baseball meant that it was extremely slow to allow African-American pitchers to play a prominent role -- even as great black hitters such as Aaron, Willie Mays and Roy Campanella were knocking the stuffing out of the ball. Finally, Aaron played much of his career in an era when offense dominated in the NL, just like Bonds during the so-called "steroids era."

None of the above takes anything away from the greatness of Aaron, Ruth or Bonds. All players play in the era that they were born into, and all of them play with significant advantages and some disadvantages. As one might expect, great records tend to be set during years and eras when the natural advantages point in a particular way, aiding one group of players while simultaneously penalizing others.

Perceptions of baseball history are slippery, especially for those who have gone around the bend over the usage of steroids and the offensive explosion of the 1990s and early 2000s. Consider these facts for a moment. The top-scoring decade in modern NL history (i.e., since 1901) was from 1921 through '30 with 9.8 runs per game. From 1991 through 2003, NL scoring was 9.2 runs per game. Forget steroids, what kind of performance enhancers were those guys using in the 1920s?

The American League saw 10.4 runs scored per game during 1931-1940, a modern high for a league. That mark still stands, even after the offensive peak of 1991-2000 (AL: 9.9) and even when counting 2001-03 before testing as a "decade" (AL: 9.7). Yet when AL scoring hit exactly that same average with 10.4 runs per game in 1999, the hue and cry about how "arena baseball" had made a mockery of the game was unbelievable.

From 1951 through '60, NL hitters slammed 1.8 home runs per game, barely different from the 1.9 per game hit from 1991 through 2000. What was the hidden secret, other than the prodigious talent of the great sluggers such as Aaron and Mays?

So all of the hand-wringing over the integrity of baseball's records boils down to this: During 1991-2003, home runs were hit at a rate higher than ever before, and some of that increase had to do with performance-enhancing drugs. Big deal. The common belief that the new steroid-testing regimen of 2004 caused offense and home runs to drop is a fallacy. The fact is that scoring and home runs both peaked in 2000 and had dropped approximately 8 percent in the following three years.

Steroids were only one part of the offensive equation, and probably not the most important element. There were several other major reasons and a dozen minor factors that also contributed to the barrage of long balls. Furthermore, all steroid usage was not against the rules, depending on the year in question and the drugs taken. And even when it was, MLB deliberately chose to look the other way when the game needed to bring back the fans and the record-setting rules-breakers were packing ballparks.

So if the "blame" for the home run binge can't be laid upon steroids, then why the outrage? Because using steroids was cheating? C'mon. Really? Cheating has been part of major league baseball since the beginning, and a review of baseball history indicates that pitchers have been far bigger cheaters than hitters for most of that time. Cooperstown is full of pitchers who cheated for decades; let's get a retired U.S. senator to investigate their careers.

Many older baseball fans fondly remember the great 1968 season, when Hall of Famer Bob Gibson seemed invincible -- at least until he faced the Detroit Tigers in Game 7 of the World Series. Gibson posted an unbelievable 1.12 ERA that year, going 22-9 with 28 complete games and hurling 13 shutouts. (Gibson's ERA is widely, though erroneously, believed to be the best in modern history.) In response to the dearth of offense after that "great" season, baseball owners lowered the height of the pitching mound from 15 to 10 inches.

[Barry Bonds] is not a perfect person, nor has his career been without controversy. As such, he fits perfectly into the imperfect history of the national pastime.

In a recent panel discussion about steroids and Barry Bonds, hosted by Bob Costas on HBO, Gibson complained about that rule change, calling it "illegal" and implying that all batting records set after 1968 were suspect. Gibson conveniently failed to mention, however, that his career season was possible only because those same owners had made another rule change in 1963, when they enlarged the strike zone from the armpits to the top of the shoulders. Giving this huge advantage to pitchers in a high-strike environment immediately caused scoring to drop 15 percent to deadball-era levels in the National League.

In 1968, Gibson enjoyed pitching in a league in which offense was lower than at any time since 1908. Why hasn't that made the pitching records set during the mid-1960s suspect? Or "illegal," to adopt Gibson's standard?

Let's take another prominent example: Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak. It is often cited as the paradigm of an unimpeachable record by those who feel that the integrity of all home run records has now been destroyed. Did you know that DiMaggio's legendary streak was prolonged by a highly unusual stratagem, employed solely to help preserve the streak? In the bottom of the eighth inning of Game 38, with a runner on base and one out and New York leading by two runs, Yankees slugger Tommy Henrich laid down a sacrifice bunt. Why? To avoid hitting into an inning-ending double play with the hitless-on-the-day DiMaggio on deck.

Henrich hit 31 home runs that year, sacrificing only seven other times and grounding into only six DPs. He never would have laid down that bunt if not to guarantee DiMaggio would get another chance to extend the streak. Does that call into question the integrity of that record?

Barry Bonds is unquestionably one of the greatest players ever to play the game. He is also one of the greatest home run hitters in history. He will end up holding many important records. He is not a perfect person, nor has his career been without controversy. As such, he fits perfectly into the imperfect history of the national pastime.

Enough is enough.

wow, most truth about baseball i've ever read in such a concise article. baseball = who can cheat the best. always has, always will. sh*t aint gonna change. america's pastime is corrupt, and now all these white people are atacking someone for "cheating" when what he's done isn't even technically disallowed? i love the hypocrisy.

 12 years ago '06        #223
panero 
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it doesnt matter he will never be acknowledeged one the truth comes out. he's a coward of a man. along with mcgwie, sosa, palmerio and who ever else they will never be recognized

 12 years ago '04        #224
Gtownkid04 
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so i guess half of the hall of fame is cowards?

 12 years ago '04        #225
Mysonne 1 heat pts
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 Javon23 said

[pic - click to view]


once more!

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