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May 24 - Biden to sign police reform executive order on George Floyd anniversary



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 1 month ago '04        #1
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May 24 - Biden to sign police reform executive order on George Floyd anniversary
 

 
President Joe Biden will mark the anniversary of George Floyd’s death by signing an executive order on Wednesday to establish new rules for use of force by federal law enforcement officers, theGrio has learned.

The presidential action is an attempt to fulfill a campaign promise in 2020 to reform policing on the national level, create accountability and protect civil rights.

Now, two years later, a source familiar with the anticipated executive order told theGrio that President Biden’s unilateral move is an “effort to be responsive” after Congress failed to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act – a comprehensive police reform bill intended to prevent and remedy racial profiling and excessive use of force.

Some high-profile families who have been impacted by deadly police violence will be on hand for the presidential signing ceremony. The one order is expected to be signed to extend measures on police use of force after civil rights leaders submitted guidance requesting at least 20 executive actions.

Sources described the order as progressive and one that mirrors the State of California’s use of force statute, which more narrowly defines a “justifiable homicide.”

Any executive order signed by Biden could ultimately be reversed by another administration when he is no longer in office. However, the White House is hoping to do its part in lieu of legislative action from Congress. Attempts to pass a bipartisan Floyd bill fell apart when Democrats and Republicans failed to reconcile their differences on provisions of the legislation.

The executive signing will take place on the second anniversary of the death of Floyd, who was k*lled by Minneapolis Police on May 25, 2020. Video and images of Floyd losing the literal breath from his body — and witnessed in perpetuity on social media — forever live in the consciousness of Americans. Former officer Derek Chauvin, who placed his knee on Floyd’s neck for more than 9 minutes, was convicted of murder and was sentenced to 22.5 years in prison. Three other officers were also convicted for violating Floyd’s civil rights.

In the immediate aftermath of Floyd’s murder, mass demonstrations emerged in Minneapolis and around the world and galvanized a new global movement for racial justice while in the midst of the deadly COVID-19 pandemic. At the time, then Democratic presidential candidate Biden traveled to Minnesota to meet with Floyd’s family.

More notably, he made the campaign promise to root out racial bias and brutality in policing through federal reform measures. Biden’s decision to select Kamala Harris, a Black woman, as his vice presidential nominee was largely seen as a direct response to the moment.

However, after Biden was elected, the push for the Floyd bill became an uphill battle. In an effort to reach a bipartisan consensus on police reform, a coalition of lawmakers on Capitol Hill — Democrats Sen. Cory Booker and Rep. Karen Bass and Republican Sen. Tim Scott — met for several months. The two parties ultimately failed to reconcile their political differences and move the bill forward.

On the first anniversary of George Floyd’s murder, President Biden invited the Floyd family to the White House in hopes that he would have a bill passed by Congress to sign into law. A major sticking point was Republicans’ opposition to amending the legal provision known as “qualified immunity” that allows for a high threshold of legal accountability when an officer uses excessive or deadly force.

There was little public uproar over the failure to pass the police reform bill to suggest any political blowback.

Toluse Olorunnipa, co-author of the new book “His Name Is George Floyd,” told theGrio, “it’s hard to see how our politics can navigate through [it]” when people aren’t really discussing police reform in the public sphere.

“Systemic racism is going to be a long f*ght to get to that place,” said Olorunnipa, “it’s an ongoing f*ght for those activists who were originally part of the Black Lives Matter movement and continue to f*ght for those same issues.”

Rep. Bass, who is running in this year’s mayoral race in Los Angeles, said negotiations on a bipartisan effort to enact police reform failed because Scott wanted to roll back what Democrats saw as minimal accountability established by former President Donald Trump.

“Senator Scott was actually proposing that we do less than President Trump and obviously we couldn’t,” Bass told theGrio.

“Any time you do legislation, the most important measure is [to] do no harm. That would have done harm.”

Scott, she said, also found that a proposal from Booker “wasn’t acceptable” to him. Bass emphasized that Booker’s proposal was the result of negotiating with law enforcement organizations like the Fraternal Order of Police, which endorsed the Floyd bill.

“Well, if you can’t go with that, then it’s off,” Bass recalled of Democrats’ thinking at that time.

The congresswoman also noted that President Biden had not reversed Trump’s previous police reform executive order. The Floyd bill, she said, would’ve simply put those measures into law rather than be potentially overturned by a future administration.

Beyond Wednesday’s executive order signing, the Biden administration is expected to be urged by civil rights leaders to continue the push to reform police and practices through law. However, recent past events suggest Republicans may not have a political appetite for passage of the Floyd bill. Many believed that to be evident in Sen. Scott’s lack of cooperation with Democrats once negotiations fell apart.

While Bass said she believed Scott was “genuine” in his quest to achieve bipartisan police reform in George Floyd’s honor, she also noted that the South Carolina lawmaker’s rising popularity among Republicans following his State of Union rebuttal to President Biden may have caused him to “backtrack.”

“He raised a ton of money,” said Bass. “There was [also] word circulating, maybe he’s presidential material.”

During his speech, Scott, the Republican Party’s lone Black U.S. Senator, infamously said that “America is not a racist country.”

The senator said that after the death of Floyd and Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, he proposed a police reform bill that Democrats blocked from a debate on the Senate floor.

“My friends across the aisle seemed to want the issue more than they wanted a solution. But I’m still working,” he said. “I’m still hopeful.”
;t=OGyCnTh3f_XhInkXX_PVmw
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 1 month ago '20        #2
Alpha Trion 
Props total: 277 277  Slaps total: 44 44
a full 2 years after he promised he would, i wonder what could have prompted this...oh yeah the fact that he's fu*king the fu*k up and needs to pander.

Don't fall for it, if it was important he'd have done it within the first 90 days like said he would.
+54   

 1 month ago '18        #3
OLITO 
Props total: 10226 10 K  Slaps total: 3565 3 K
just keep pushing back them student loans n*gga...
+29   

 1 month ago '18        #4
LuxuriousGreen  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x3
Props total: 9674 9 K  Slaps total: 2601 2 K

Sources described the order as progressive and one that mirrors the State of California’s use of force statute, which more narrowly defines a “justifiable homicide.”




Here is what you need to know about new laws regarding policing officially going to effect Jan. 1, 2022.

AB-89

Summary: Raises the age limit to be a police officer in the state of California from 18 to 21 while requiring that new officers also have a bachelor's degree. A policing degree program will be established by the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges and implemented by the existing Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training.

What’s new: Current laws require prospective police officers in California to complete a Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) program. The program requires that students hold a high school diploma and be either 18 or older.

This bill, the Peace Officers Education and Age Conditions for Employment Act or PEACE Act, will require the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to create modern policing criteria to be adopted by the Commission. The program will require students to be 21 or older at time of appointment. Financial aid resources for students in underserved and disadvantaged areas will also be required to be adopted under the PEACE Act.

Why it’s needed: Studies show that developing areas of the brain do not fully develop or mature until the age of 25 and that a four-year education in college significantly reduces the chance of an officer using excessive force. Author of the bill, a*semblymember Reggie Jones-Sawyer, D- Los Angeles, described the PEACE Act as a “data-driven bill.” He expects the new law to “ transform departments across the state.”

AB-481

Summary: Requires law enforcement agencies to pass a military equipment use policy, during a public meeting, in order to receive and continue using surplus equipment from the U.S. Military. This policy must be reviewed annually and can be amended by the agency’s governing body. For state agencies wishing to use and acquire military surplus equipment, they must also create a policy, post it on their website, review it annually and a copy must be provided to the Governor’s Office. Agencies which already operate equipment from the military must now hold a public meeting through their governing body as well, to approve the continued use and acceptance of that equipment.

What’s new: Current laws allow the Department of General Services to supply law enforcement agencies in the state with surplus equipment from the military. Agencies are not required to advertise publicly for bids for the equipment or request delivery before payment. This law will, for the first time, force the establishment of policies by agencies who wish to use equipment offered by the military.

Why it’s needed: Former a*semblymember David Chiu, who authored AB-481 before resigning from the state a*sembly to become the City Attorney of San Francisco, argued that the acquisition of military equipment can be costly to law enforcement agencies and leads to distrust in the community.

In an interview with ABC10 regarding the bill, Chiu said, “The public has a right to know when and why police believe they need to use military caliber equipment especially when public dollars are at stake.” According to Chiu, law enforcement agencies in the state have purchased more military equipment than agencies of any other state during the last 30 years.

The public often has little information on the acquisition of military equipment, which can cost tens of millions of dollars, Chiu writes. Chiu authored the bill in light of incidents of military equipment being used on peaceful demonstrations across the state with no clear protocol.

AB-26

Summary: Requires officers to immediately report potential incidents of excessive force and intervene if they witness excessive force that is “clearly beyond that which is necessary.” Law enforcement agencies will be required to revise policies to prevent retaliation against officers who report violations of law. Use of force policies must also require that officers who do not intercede when present in cases of excessive force, be disciplined up to and including in the same way the officer who used excessive force was disciplined.

What’s new: This law clarifies the timeline for officers who report cases of potential excessive force. The law specifies that the reporting of potential cases of excessive force by officers must be immediate. It also prohibits retaliation when officers report such cases. Also new, officers who witness but do not intercede in cases of excessive force can receive the same discipline as the officer who used excessive force.

Why it’s needed: AB-26 was authored by a*semblymember Chris Holden, D-Pasadena, following the murder of George Floyd by a Minnesota police officer who used force during an arrest. According to Holden, the law will increase public trust and accountability in law enforcement.

The Los Angeles County Public Defender’s Office found that the law would increase accountability by creating clear guidelines requiring officers to report incidents of excessive force and intercede. The office also notes that the law will, in some cases, prevent the re-hiring of officers who were found to have used excessive force or who were determined to have failed to intercede.

AB-490

Summary: Forbids law enforcement agencies from authorizing methods of transport or techniques that lead to a “substantial risk” of positional asphyxia. Positional asphyxia is a position in which someone is prevented from breathing.

What’s new: State laws require that law enforcement agencies have a policy regarding use of force and the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training is required to create courses both regularly and periodically to train law enforcement officers in the area of using force. Existing laws prohibit law enforcement agencies from authorizing choke holds or carotid restraints. This law will add positional asphyxia to the list of techniques not allowed to be authorized by law enforcement officers in California.

Why it’s needed: AB-490 was written by a*sembly member Mike Gipson, D-Gardena, and former a*sembly member Rob Bonta, after the death of Angelo Quinto by police in Antioch. Quinto lost and never regained consciousness after an Antioch Police officer knelt on his neck, face-down, for almost five minutes as another officer restrained his legs. Quinto was suffering from a mental health episode. a*sembly members Gipson and Bonta drew similarities between Quinto’s death and the k*lling of George Floyd by a Minnesota police officer who also knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes proving to be fatal. AB-490 expands on previous efforts, such as banning training on chokeholds, to limit excessive force by law enforcement.
+13   

 1 month ago '16        #5
Soo Special OG  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2
Props total: 44791 44 K  Slaps total: 8196 8 K
 LuxuriousGreen said

Sources described the order as progressive and one that mirrors the State of California’s use of force statute, which more narrowly defines a “justifiable homicide.”




Here is what you need to know about new laws regarding policing officially going to effect Jan. 1, 2022.
interesting...
+3   

 1 month ago '22        #6
MONEY WORLD 
Props total: 1435 1 K  Slaps total: 855 855
 Alpha Trion said
a full 2 years after he promised he would, i wonder what could have prompted this...oh yeah the fact that he's fu*king the fu*k up and needs to pander.

Don't fall for it, if it was important he'd have done it within the first 90 days like said he would.
Big facts. I couldn't have said it better myself. Too little, too late.
+2   

 1 month ago '20        #7
Xiox  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 62669 62 K  Slaps total: 11479 11 K
He need to stop customs from harassing people & taking their shyte
+3   

 1 month ago '16        #8
Vega  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 19945 19 K  Slaps total: 3103 3 K
 Alpha Trion said
a full 2 years after he promised he would, i wonder what could have prompted this...oh yeah the fact that he's fu*king the fu*k up and needs to pander.

Don't fall for it, if it was important he'd have done it within the first 90 days like said he would.
That’s because Cory Booker tried to pass the reform bill thru congress but it died for good this year.

Biden tried his best to be bi-partisan but his own fu*king party in Manchin and Sinema fu*ked him over.

So now it’s time to go the EO route like Obama did in his last 2 years.
+20   

 1 month ago '20        #9
Xiox  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 62669 62 K  Slaps total: 11479 11 K
I say hold the rank & file officers accountable for bad policing
+4   

 1 month ago '21        #10
Tlatoani  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 26789 26 K  Slaps total: 7228 7 K
 Alpha Trion said
a full 2 years after he promised he would, i wonder what could have prompted this...oh yeah the fact that he's fu*king the fu*k up and needs to pander.

Don't fall for it, if it was important he'd have done it within the first 90 days like said he would.
It took him two years to realize Republicans weren't playing ball.

They've been calling democrats pedophiles since Pizzagate and this old a*s bi*ch was still trying to play friends


Shoulda voted for Bernie
+5   

 1 month ago '13        #11
3nl1ght3ned 
Props total: 8334 8 K  Slaps total: 6800 6 K
I cannot stand this guy.
+1   

 1 month ago '21        #12
Monstrosity 
Props total: 5502 5 K  Slaps total: 766 766
 Alpha Trion said
a full 2 years after he promised he would, i wonder what could have prompted this...oh yeah the fact that he's fu*king the fu*k up and needs to pander.

Don't fall for it, if it was important he'd have done it within the first 90 days like said he would.
He needs to pander, but he actually did something besides talking about doing something on the eve of an election when it's to late for actual action. Like that "Platinum Plan" plan BS.

Is it even pandering if he's delivering on what he said he would do? LOL.


Last edited by Monstrosity; 05-24-2022 at 12:40 PM..
+2   

 1 month ago '04        #13
Kadroan  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x26 OP
Props total: 50113 50 K  Slaps total: 6085 6 K
 OLITO said
just keep pushing back them student loans n*gga...

;t=qybT80w9U9JI9ctTXGy0OA
Lol
-1   

 1 month ago '20        #14
Jimmy2times 
Props total: 28472 28 K  Slaps total: 2482 2 K
What's it called? The "You Ain't Black Act" ?

The way these mfs pander is disgusting.
+12   

 1 month ago '20        #15
RockyII 
Props total: 11565 11 K  Slaps total: 1632 1 K
 3nl1ght3ned said
I cannot stand this guy.
Stfu and go jack off for old perverts like you were. fu*king pu**yass tiny tank. Be your bi*chass has a onlyfans page where you go do that sh*t…
-1   

 1 month ago '20        #16
RockyII 
Props total: 11565 11 K  Slaps total: 1632 1 K
 Kadroan said



Lol
The government is freely giving money and resources to Ukraine. Don’t bullsh*t me on student loans…
+5   

 1 month ago '18        #17
MC Gusto  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 18151 18 K  Slaps total: 2079 2 K
 Kadroan said



Lol
n*gga sent over a trillion to them Ukraine n*ggas. Can’t get any worse!
+4   

 1 month ago '18        #18
MC Gusto  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 18151 18 K  Slaps total: 2079 2 K
 RockyII said
The government is freely giving money and resources to Ukraine. Don’t bullsh*t me on student loans…
See post #17

 1 month ago '16        #19
MadMarlo 
Props total: 23612 23 K  Slaps total: 4976 4 K
 Jimmy2times said
What's it called? The "You Ain't Black Act" ?

The way these mfs pander is disgusting.
Are u too lazy to read?

Why is an executive order pandering???
+1   

 1 month ago '05        #20
lamarowns 
Props total: 9598 9 K  Slaps total: 2222 2 K
Mfs voted for this mf even after ppl warned them… idgaf what he does, as long as it involves erasing student loans
+1   

 1 month ago '06        #21
Icee 
Props total: 36463 36 K  Slaps total: 2575 2 K
Good ole


 1 month ago '15        #22
Tripsev 
Props total: 7374 7 K  Slaps total: 3338 3 K
Cuz it’s all about the narrative. He should have signed it a long time ago.
+2   

 1 month ago '05        #23
projectd06 
Props total: 38338 38 K  Slaps total: 8848 8 K
 MONEY WORLD said
Big facts. I couldn't have said it better myself. Too little, too late.
Soooooo many '22 accounts talking politics on here, and you all swear your not alts or dupe accounts.

+12   

 1 month ago '07        #24
FeedTheBeast 
Props total: 16874 16 K  Slaps total: 1685 1 K
 LuxuriousGreen said

Sources described the order as progressive and one that mirrors the State of California’s use of force statute, which more narrowly defines a “justifiable homicide.”




Here is what you need to know about new laws regarding policing officially going to effect Jan. 1, 2022.

AB-89

Summary: Raises the age limit to be a police officer in the state of California from 18 to 21 while requiring that new officers also have a bachelor's degree. A policing degree program will be established by the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges and implemented by the existing Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training.

What’s new: Current laws require prospective police officers in California to complete a Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) program. The program requires that students hold a high school diploma and be either 18 or older.

This bill, the Peace Officers Education and Age Conditions for Employment Act or PEACE Act, will require the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to create modern policing criteria to be adopted by the Commission. The program will require students to be 21 or older at time of appointment. Financial aid resources for students in underserved and disadvantaged areas will also be required to be adopted under the PEACE Act.

Why it’s needed: Studies show that developing areas of the brain do not fully develop or mature until the age of 25 and that a four-year education in college significantly reduces the chance of an officer using excessive force. Author of the bill, a*semblymember Reggie Jones-Sawyer, D- Los Angeles, described the PEACE Act as a “data-driven bill.” He expects the new law to “ transform departments across the state.”

AB-481

Summary: Requires law enforcement agencies to pass a military equipment use policy, during a public meeting, in order to receive and continue using surplus equipment from the U.S. Military. This policy must be reviewed annually and can be amended by the agency’s governing body. For state agencies wishing to use and acquire military surplus equipment, they must also create a policy, post it on their website, review it annually and a copy must be provided to the Governor’s Office. Agencies which already operate equipment from the military must now hold a public meeting through their governing body as well, to approve the continued use and acceptance of that equipment.

What’s new: Current laws allow the Department of General Services to supply law enforcement agencies in the state with surplus equipment from the military. Agencies are not required to advertise publicly for bids for the equipment or request delivery before payment. This law will, for the first time, force the establishment of policies by agencies who wish to use equipment offered by the military.

Why it’s needed: Former a*semblymember David Chiu, who authored AB-481 before resigning from the state a*sembly to become the City Attorney of San Francisco, argued that the acquisition of military equipment can be costly to law enforcement agencies and leads to distrust in the community.

In an interview with ABC10 regarding the bill, Chiu said, “The public has a right to know when and why police believe they need to use military caliber equipment especially when public dollars are at stake.” According to Chiu, law enforcement agencies in the state have purchased more military equipment than agencies of any other state during the last 30 years.

The public often has little information on the acquisition of military equipment, which can cost tens of millions of dollars, Chiu writes. Chiu authored the bill in light of incidents of military equipment being used on peaceful demonstrations across the state with no clear protocol.

AB-26

Summary: Requires officers to immediately report potential incidents of excessive force and intervene if they witness excessive force that is “clearly beyond that which is necessary.” Law enforcement agencies will be required to revise policies to prevent retaliation against officers who report violations of law. Use of force policies must also require that officers who do not intercede when present in cases of excessive force, be disciplined up to and including in the same way the officer who used excessive force was disciplined.

What’s new: This law clarifies the timeline for officers who report cases of potential excessive force. The law specifies that the reporting of potential cases of excessive force by officers must be immediate. It also prohibits retaliation when officers report such cases. Also new, officers who witness but do not intercede in cases of excessive force can receive the same discipline as the officer who used excessive force.

Why it’s needed: AB-26 was authored by a*semblymember Chris Holden, D-Pasadena, following the murder of George Floyd by a Minnesota police officer who used force during an arrest. According to Holden, the law will increase public trust and accountability in law enforcement.

The Los Angeles County Public Defender’s Office found that the law would increase accountability by creating clear guidelines requiring officers to report incidents of excessive force and intercede. The office also notes that the law will, in some cases, prevent the re-hiring of officers who were found to have used excessive force or who were determined to have failed to intercede.

AB-490

Summary: Forbids law enforcement agencies from authorizing methods of transport or techniques that lead to a “substantial risk” of positional asphyxia. Positional asphyxia is a position in which someone is prevented from breathing.

What’s new: State laws require that law enforcement agencies have a policy regarding use of force and the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training is required to create courses both regularly and periodically to train law enforcement officers in the area of using force. Existing laws prohibit law enforcement agencies from authorizing choke holds or carotid restraints. This law will add positional asphyxia to the list of techniques not allowed to be authorized by law enforcement officers in California.

Why it’s needed: AB-490 was written by a*sembly member Mike Gipson, D-Gardena, and former a*sembly member Rob Bonta, after the death of Angelo Quinto by police in Antioch. Quinto lost and never regained consciousness after an Antioch Police officer knelt on his neck, face-down, for almost five minutes as another officer restrained his legs. Quinto was suffering from a mental health episode. a*sembly members Gipson and Bonta drew similarities between Quinto’s death and the k*lling of George Floyd by a Minnesota police officer who also knelt on Floyd’s neck for several minutes proving to be fatal. AB-490 expands on previous efforts, such as banning training on chokeholds, to limit excessive force by law enforcement.


Thanks....the article didnt even discuss the contents of the order unless I overlooked it
+4   

 1 month ago '06        #25
Supa mario 
Props total: 28407 28 K  Slaps total: 2717 2 K
 RockyII said
The government is freely giving money and resources to Ukraine. Don’t bullsh*t me on student loans…
Isn't that Ukraine money already in the budget? I thought they have a budget for sh*t like that?

Student loans need to be cancelled while we at it let's cancel mortgage loans and credit card debt. Let's go all out.
+5   



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