1,987
 

ADOS/FBA Pimp Toast/70s Street Culture: Another Root Of Hip Hop, Vulture Proof.



ADVERTISEMENT
 
topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot 3X PLAT




section  x1   |  0 bx goons and 1 bystanders Share this on Twitter       Share this on Facebook

section hiphop
  
 2 months ago '19        #1
1065 page views
51 comments


Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2
avatar
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
ADOS/FBA Pimp Toast/70s Street Culture: Another Root Of Hip Hop, Vulture Proof.
 

 
Let's start this thread off by citing ONE of the pioneers of Hip Hop, Kool Herc's biggest influence, second only to the Godfather of modern music James Brown, the 1973 album Hustler’s Convention by Lightning Rod of The Last Poets.

This album gives a small glimpse into what street n*gga life was like in NYC right before Hip Hop culminated. It'll also give you a glimpse into how African American centered the culture was in NYC at the time, as well as how the art of toasting, rapping, rhyming, and jive talk was something that African Americans had always done and shows how ridiculous the thought of it coming from Jamaica, or anywhere else is.

Hustlers Convention is an album recorded by Jalal Mansur Nuriddin under the pseudonym Lightnin' Rod. The album was a major influence on hip hop music[1] and combined poetry, funk, jazz, and toasting.[2] Hustlers Convention helped add a sociopolitical element to black music.[3] The album narrates the story of two fictional hustlers, named Sport and Spoon.
"Kool Herc: “Jamaican toasting? Naw, naw. No connection there. I couldn’t play reggae in the Bronx. People wouldn’t accept it. The inspiration for rap is James Brown and the album Hustler’s Convention."

"He slapped us 5 and started rapping his jive about how happy he was that we won." image

And this toasting sh*t go way back in African American culture. Not only is toasting not an artform that originated in Jamaica, but the phrasing didn't originate with them either. It originated with ADOS/FBA pimp culture.

World famous pimp Iceberg Slim was putting out toasting albums in the 60s.

Well-known as the literary progenitor of gangster rap (Ice-T, Ice Cube and Jay-Z have all listed him as a formative influence), mostly for his groundbreaking autobiography of the subject "Pimping" on vinyl.


A pimp excerpt from 1973 discussing why African American pimp culture was becoming popular during this time period.




If any mufu*ka wanna link toasting to Hip Hop, then said mufu*ka is going to have to mention that toasting is African American.
Toasts: The Black Urban Folk Poetry
Dennis Wepman, Ronald B. Newman and Murray B. Binderman
The Journal of American Folklore
Vol. 87, No. 345 (Jul. - Sep., 1974), pp. 208-224 (17 pages)
Published By: American Folklore Society
visit this link https://doi.org/10.2307/538734
visit this link https://www.jstor.org/stable/538734
Cite this Item
image

All this im posting from 73-74 which is when Herc people claim Hip Hop started, even though Kurtis Blow said sh*t was going on by at least 1970.

It ain't easy being a Boxden content creatorimage
+19   



best
worst
51 comments
 

 2 months ago '19        #2
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
And Stacker Lee from the classic African American folk tale toasts was a pimp

All this toasting, rapping, signifying, dozens and sh*t all wraps around together with our music

In his new book titled, “I, Stagolee,” Brown recreates the drama of legendary pimp Stagolee shooting a rival one Christmas night at a bar in the late 19th century.

Stagolee, a real person known as Lee Shelton, was tried and released after the incident, but for generations after was called a “bad man” in ballads and rhymes known as “toasts” or “dozens.”
Brown’s reading will illustrate the musical and oral tradition of the “toast” or “dozens” as he is joined by bassist Ken Rousell.
Brown wants to emphasize that pimp wasn’t the same during the 19th century as it is today. Back then, pimps were more like bodyguards, also known “Johnny Walkers.” They would escort the ladies of the night as they went about their business, Brown said. Because of this, “He was a patron saint to wh*res,” Brown said. “wh*res swore by him because he was their protector and provider back then. A pimp was a positive thing.”

It wasn’t until later that the word began to take on negative connotations, Brown explained.

Stagolee’s story and ballad continues the oral tradition of black culture, says Brown.

“As a kid I really wanted to learn, memorize and perform (dozens),” Brown recalls.

“(Stagolee) was a hero, partly fantasy, empowering people to carry traditions and rhymes.
Dirty dozen or terrific toast? A pimp’s tale


+2   

 2 months ago '19        #3
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
Bump
+1   

 2 months ago '04        #4
BKLYN1889 
Props total: 1248 1 K  Slaps total: 350 350
Bump bump bump
+1   

 2 months ago '20        #5
confidential1  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 57007 57 K  Slaps total: 3093 3 K
Drop knowledge OP….

Even tho as an ADOS, I still believe in pan-Africanism and the empowerment of the entire original diaspora…… but we also need to correctly credit eac culture for their respective contributions to the entire African/black race… HIPHOP/RAP is definitely a creation of black Americans of the late 20th century…

But I also wouldn’t be surprised if we was literally rapping way back in Africa…
+9   

 2 months ago '06        #6
Mr. Future  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 12776 12 K  Slaps total: 1184 1 K
I found the Hustlers Convention record digging thru my dads old records and man, i was blown the fu*k away bro.

On another note, I believe that live music being missing from music today is whats taking the soul away.
+7   

 2 months ago '17        #7
bossflossy 
Props total: 5915 5 K  Slaps total: 479 479
Yeah, those that do their history know this thing is ados and there have been contributions from others. But they getting way too much credit for ‘creating’. Glad the record being set straight on a larger scale now
+3   

 2 months ago '16        #8
Boogie1790  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 59022 59 K  Slaps total: 9354 9 K
Ados

Agents doing oligarchs service
+2   

 2 months ago '18        #9
No Religion  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x5
Props total: 32382 32 K  Slaps total: 2396 2 K
This a gem OP.
+4   

 2 months ago '19        #10
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
 bossflossy said
Yeah, those that do their history know this thing is ados and there have been contributions from others. But they getting way too much credit for ‘creating’. Glad the record being set straight on a larger scale now
That's what I'm trying to do, set the record straight.

n*ggas crazy tryna write ADOS out they own culture and history.
+5   

 2 months ago '19        #11
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
 Boogie1790 said
Ados

Agents doing oligarchs service
Yo, where you from, dumb a*s n*gga?
-1   

 2 months ago '16        #12
BobbiHeadRagTop  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x5
Props total: 85378 85 K  Slaps total: 3948 3 K
Bet.
+3   

 2 months ago '17        #13
Fortune  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 50807 50 K  Slaps total: 3826 3 K
no lie bruh this might be the best hip hop related sh*t I've ever seen on any forum or social media platform

+2   

 2 months ago '19        #14
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
 Fortune said
no lie bruh this might be the best hip hop related sh*t I've ever seen on any forum or social media platform

Appreciate the props, bro.

We have to take our history back and frame our own stories.

Outsiders ain't gon do it right.
-1   

 2 months ago '18        #15
BrooklynDamien  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2
Props total: 43875 43 K  Slaps total: 3756 3 K
iceberg slim books got the pimps rapping the toasts and he was pimping during ww2 and sh*t.
+1   

 2 months ago '17        #16
Fortune  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 50807 50 K  Slaps total: 3826 3 K
 Bam Bam said
Appreciate the props, bro.

We have to take our history back and frame our own stories.

Outsiders ain't gon do it right.
fasho homie, i got love for anybody who got love for our true culture.

keep yo foot on they kneck.

bout to roll a big a*s backwood n try to binge this whole sh*t

 2 months ago '16        #17
BathWaterMelody  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x8
Props total: 78679 78 K  Slaps total: 10771 10 K
good read OP
+1   

 2 months ago '06        #18
Junglist 
Props total: 20298 20 K  Slaps total: 2194 2 K
 Boogie1790 said
Ados

Agents doing oligarchs service
It’s so obvious and ppl still take the bait every time
+2   

 2 months ago '16        #19
Boogie1790  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 59022 59 K  Slaps total: 9354 9 K
 Junglist said
It’s so obvious and ppl still take the bait every time
I saw a video where a dude called Tariq out for this sh*t and Tariq got to ask where he from to find out his fam Jamican. Lol, why beef with people that look exactly like you. n*ggas say gangs are stupid and come with some stupider sh*t

 2 months ago '16        #20
Boogie1790  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
Props total: 59022 59 K  Slaps total: 9354 9 K
 Bam Bam said
Appreciate the props, bro.

We have to take our history back and frame our own stories.

Outsiders ain't gon do it right.
Your stories don't change the fact that black slaves were sold to the Caribbean from the Yd and Vice Versa.

Yall n*gga jus dumb

 2 months ago '19        #21
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
 GUS FRING said
garbage
Complete fu*king trash
-1   

 2 months ago '19        #22
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
 Boogie1790 said
Your stories don't change the fact that black slaves were sold to the Caribbean from the Yd and Vice Versa.

Yall n*gga jus dumb
No, the insignificant overexaggeration of U.S. and Caribbean slave traders doing business doesn't change the fact that every group in the African diaspora has there own culture and history independent of one another.

What is your ethnicity, bi*ch n*gga?
-2   

 2 months ago '19        #23
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
@

You should be embarrassed for posting that fu*king bullsh*t in here at this point.

The lies start at the beginning.

I could body that fu*king bullsh*t line for line but really not in the mood.
-1   

 2 months ago '19        #24
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
@

Nah, fu*k that.

I'm bout to tear yo lying a*s up.

Can't let that bullsh*t you kickin ride.
-1   

 2 months ago '19        #25
Bam Bam  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2 OP
Props total: 9399 9 K  Slaps total: 4328 4 K
 GUS FRING said
The heart and soul of HIP HOP is BATTLING which defines the competitive spirit of the culture

BATTLING originated with SOUNDCLASHING which didnt come from misognistic drug addicted pimps from america nor the jive talking radio disc jocks of the south and northeast

no it comes from JAMAICAN SOUNDSYSTEMS finding the best records to get the best response from the crowd...two selectors VERSES each other with TOASTERS (rappers) on the mic BIGGING up the sound .....so they CAN DO A SOUND BOY BURIAL (KILL) THE OTHER for VICTORY....

JAMAICANS have been doing this since the MID 50s long before hip hop was created and before the OP was a twinkle in his DEADBEAT AFRICAN AMERICAN DADDY'S NUTSACK.....

lol



American Hip Hop has it's roots in the Jamaican Soundsystem culture which was brought forth by Kool Herc to the states who stated how he was heavily influenced by the mobile jamaican soundsystems of the past such as Black Scorpio..Killamanjaro (kill a man jaro) and Coxsone Downbeat Sounds


The Father of the Jamaican soundsystems as well as Clashing (battling) was Tom the Great Sebastian who played his first dances in the 1950's and clashed with rival sounds such as Duke Reid's Trojan Sounds and Coxsone Sounds which was the first sound to play Bob Marley tunes




The art of finding obscure sounds and riddims (instrumentals) for someone to voice (toast, rap) over was credited to Tom the Great sebastian who often had mic men (mcees) such as Prince Buster..Dennis Alcapone and what many consider the first "rapper" Count Matchucki

Many of them achieved "stardom" for thier works such as Dennis Alcapone who was very popular in the UK during the 70s...

LONG BEFORE AMERICAN RAPPERS cut thier first records in 1979 and the 80s

Dennis first cut got his break on the mic in the mid 60s as a protege of Prince Buster.......long before Kool Herc played his first party in 73...and .he cut records all thru the 70s long before the RAP INDUSTRY released records




DENNIS ALCAPONE performing LIVE in UK in 1973 BBC TOP OF THE POPS




It was even documented on film..here is "rapper" Prince Buster deejaying pon di turntables in the movie THE HARDER THEY COME in 1972





First of all, bi*ch n*gga, battling is NOT the soul of Hip Hop. Even if battling was the soul of Hip Hop, soundclashing would NOT be the stepping stone that put it there. The dozens would be what put the competitive nature in Hip Hop.

The soul of Hip Hop in the early days was the DJ, and that makes sense because Hip Hop DJ culture came from Disco DJ culture. Even a stupid tree climber like you should know how important the DJ was to the Disco scenes. Even Kool Herc himself took his name from a DJ a*sociated with the Disco scene, Kool DJ Dee.

All Herc did was improve a technique that Disco DJs had been doing since the 60s and you n*ggas turn around claim Hip Hop came from Jamaica just because his parents were from there, even though his father was a bigger fan of African American music than he was of his own?






No DJs gave a fu*k about soundclashing or Jamaican music in general in 1970s New York City.

I've never heard any n*ggas from back then mention soundclashing.

Toasting is African American in origin and Herc's "toaster" aka emcee was Coke La Rock who was an African American from North Carolina. He was doing the dozens. Herc wasn't a rapper, n*gga.

Herc and Bambatta have both stated Jamaican soundsystems had nothing to do with Hip Hop.
I’ve always asked the Bronx cats that I’ve interviewed this one important question, “Yo, what impact did the Jamaican sound systems have on ya’ll?”

Everybody from Toney Tone to Kool Herc to Bambaataa said: “None, none at all. They weren’t a part of our thing. They did their own thing.”
The one time I interviewed Kool Herc I asked him about the Jamaican sound systems in the Bronxand he acknowledged knowing a few of them, but said that they had no influence or impact whatsoever.



Even if they did, your "jamaican" Soundsystems were influenced by African Americans from the south and this is word to Coxsone Dodd.



The Kingston-born Dodd used to play records to the customers in his parents' shop. During a spell in the American South he became familiar with the rhythm and blues music popular there at the time. In 1954, back in Jamaica, he set up the Downbeat Sound System, being the owner of an amplifier, a turntable, and some US records, which he would import from New Orleans and Miami.

With the success of his sound system, and in a competitive environment, Dodd would make trips through the US looking for new tunes to attract the Jamaican public.
Count Matchuki learned how to toast from hearing African American radio DJs.

Count Matchuki, born Winston Cooper in 1934, is widely considered the first toaster. He was raised in a family that had more money than others so he grew up with two gramophones in the home and was exposed to swing, jazz, bebop, and rhythm & blues. He says that he got the idea to begin toasting over records after hearing American radio. He told this to Mark Gorney and Michael Turner as they recount in a 1996 issue of Beat Magazine. “I was walking late one night about a quarter to three. Somewhere in Denham Town. And I hear this guy on the radio, some American guy advertising Royal Crown Hair Dressing. ‘You see you’re drying up with this one, Johnny, try Royal Crown. When you’re downtown you’re the smartest guy in town, when you use Royal Crown and Royal Crown make you the smartest guy in town.’ That deliverance! This guy sound like a machine! A tongue-twister! I heard that in 1949. On one of them States stations that was really strong. I hear this guy sing out ‘pon the radio and I just like the sound. And I say, I think I can do better. I’d like to play some recordings and just jive talk like this guy.”
There would be "Jamaican " toasting if African Americans didn't create it first so what makes you think we got it from Herc and not our ancestors?

James Brown, Muddy Waters, Howling Wolf, etc. were popular in the UK before Dennis Alcapone and the BBC will be the first to tell you that. You n*ggas are weirdos.

Disco DJ Grandmaster Flowers was using 2 and 3 turntables in the 60s and Kurtis Blow said they had breakers in 1970, three years before Herc.
-3   



Sign me up
 
 

yesterday...


most viewed right now
+28online now  7
Lol.i didn't know William Shatner is the face of Michael Myers
29 comments
1 day ago
@movies
most viewed right now
+28online now  7
Article inside Fewer men attending college is leading toward "mating crisis", says N..
271 comments
1 day ago
@wild'ish
most viewed right now
online now  6
Kyrie Irving could skip Nets home games because of ‘oppressing’ vaccine ma..
152 comments
1 day ago
@sports
most viewed right now
online now  5
Video inside Sep 26 - 75 year old man convinced by Anti Vaxxers to leave hospital di..
102 comments
1 day ago
@news
back to top
register register Follow BX @ Twitter search BX privacyprivacy