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Mannie Fresh Tells All: Stories Behind His Classic Records!!!


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 3 weeks ago '14        #1
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Mannie Fresh Tells All: Stories Behind His Classic Records!!!
 

 
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Juvenile “Ha”



Mannie Fresh: “'Ha' was the last song for 400 Degreez we added. I felt like we needed one more song that needed to be raw, it can’t be something we thought about. He was like, 'I got something, but I really don’t know if they ready.' I was like, 'Let me hear it.' He started saying, 'Ha,' and I programmed the beat real quick. I was like, 'Dude, this is the song. This will be incredible.' He was like, 'You really think so?' It was that scary moment as an artist when you feel like you might have gone too far. I was like, 'No dude, I love everything that we’ve done on 400 Degreez, but we haven’t done anything like this, and nobody’s ever heard anything like this.’

“Usually if we was working on an album, I did beats right there on the spot like, 'Give me your rhymes so I can feel my beat patterns close to whatever it is that you doing.’ It was almost like this old school James Brown approach, if I had a bass player, somebody doing horns, it would start off with him rapping. Then I would do the beat, next thing you know the bass player joins in, then I’m telling somebody these are what the chords are, and before you know it, we’re done with that song and we’re moving on. [Laughs.]

“To me, it’s easy to do a bunch of songs because look at all the music we got in the world. You got classical, jazz, funk. All you need to do is go listen some of that and you’ll come up with ideas. Nothing is truly yours, you’re going to get an idea from something. You got some people who say, 'I came up with that all by myself,' and I’m like, 'Really? Those are Marvin Gaye chords.' There’s so much stuff out here that you can get great ideas from and put your little twist to it.”



Juvenile f/ Mannie Fresh & Lil Wayne “Back That Azz Up”



Mannie Fresh: “The crazy thing was the song was probably a year and a half old. Juvenile was already doing that song in clubs, but it didn’t have that beat to it, so it didn’t have the impact. It was more like a DJ backspinning and him saying his rhymes, but no music on top of it. I was just like, 'Dude, that song is so incredibly cool, you just gotta figure it out how you make it touch everybody.'

“I figured, how do we get everything? If we put 808 drums under this with the bounce, we got the hood. We got to get white America too, how do we do that? I was like, 'If we put some classical music on there, not only are you going to get young kids [but white America too].' I remember Sharon Stone commenting about 'Back Dat Azz Up' like, 'That’s my favorite song,' and I’m like, 'You got Sharon Stone backing that a*s up? You arrived.'

“I definitely smiled when I was making that record. I was like, ‘This right here, this the one.’ It’s one of them songs that will go on for forever. If I went up against a whole gang of tough a*s DJs, I would open my set up with 'Back Dat Azz Up,' like, 'It’s over. Who want with me?' Every producer dreams of a 'Back Dat Azz Up.' Not to discredit 'Ha,' but 'Ha' does not have that feel to it. I’m pretty sure I can’t play 'Ha' at a Bar Mitzvah and kids know it. They’ll be like, 'I don’t know that, but I know ‘Back Dat Azz Up!’"



Hot Boys f/ Big Tymers “I Need a Hot Girl”



Mannie Fresh: “That was just a fun song. One of them, 'Hey, let’s just do some bounce stuff for New Orleans.' That’s the essence of New Orleans. We didn’t go too far, but we gave you that classic little break and the hand claps that you hear in every song in the world. I’m like, ‘We need one of those classic bounce songs.’ I know Master P had a song called 'Thug Girl' at the time. When I listened to it like a month after it was released I’m like, 'OK, this is Baby taking jabs at Master P on this song.' I’m wondering if this is what this was about. [Laughs.]”


B.G. f/ Juvenile & Lil Wayne “Bling Bling”



Mannie Fresh: “I can honestly say I did not see that becoming that big. It was a Big Tymers song, but B.G.’s album was so dark we decided to give him that song. I was like, ‘It’s really nothing that’s going to give him the numbers that ya’ll trying to get out of this. You gotta put something on here that’s going to have world appeal, give him "Bling Bling." You want to sell records, right? You can’t just have him talking about murdering and k*lling people through the whole thing.’ But then I’m like, ‘Goddamn, the whole world saying this!’ When you hear Oprah saying 'Bling Bling' I was like, 'Oh sh*t, this is crazy!'

“We even got into an argument of who started the hook. I’m like, 'Dude I came in here and told you the hook,' and Wayne was like, 'No, I wrote that.' I’m like, 'Dude, you did not write that. I did the beat, and I already knew what I was going say.’ Then I started, 'Bling Bling, every time I come around your city.' That came from something that Wayne said prior to that. I always thought that it would be incredible if he could use that in the song and make that a hook.

“The only person I could say that always had they hooks was Juvie. But if I did a song, I had the hook already because I knew what I wanted to go with the song. When I did ‘Bling Bling’ I was listening to Jonzun Crew’s 'Space Is the Place.' It’s similar to that song, but I liked the hits in it. I was just like, ‘If it sounds kind of like that energy, that’s what it’s going to be.’

“My production style is from a DJ point of view. I want to see you move, as a DJ you know exactly what songs to play. Somebody can say, ‘That’s the emptiest song I ever heard,’ but you know silently as a DJ why they like it.”



Cash Money Millionaires “Project bi*ch”



Mannie Fresh: “I always noticed when we were doing something on tour that the crowd would sing along to. It would be one line that was incredibly cool and I would be like, ‘That’s the hook!’ It made things easy. The 'Project Chick' line, we got that from 'I Need a Hot Girl.' Whenever Turk said that line, the crowd went crazy. I’m like, ‘I don’t know what it is about that line, but we need to turn that into a hook.’

“Those were the last glory days of hip-hop. It wasn’t no politics in it. It was just having fun and doing records. If you was working on somebody's album within your family, everybody wanted to make it a good album. If we’re doing Wayne’s album this week then everybody would show up. Like, 'Yo, I need a verse on that, I need to get on that.' It was friendly competition. If Juvenile had a crazy verse, Wayne would be like, 'I’m going to rewrite mine, I’m not even ready to say it yet.'

“If somebody missed a session, it was incredible to somebody else. If Turk didn’t show up, Wayne would be like I got it, I’m glad he didn’t come. When we did 'Project Chick' the hook was supposed to be Turk, the line came from him. But he didn’t show up and Juvi was like, ‘I got that. Don’t worry about it.’ [Laughs.]

“That video was shot in Lil’ Haiti, Miami. My biggest thing was still we got to stay in touch regardless of what’s going on. It’s something simple in music that I understood early on. That’s why Cash Money has had longevity. You can have a Lambo but you still gotta have something that the average guy can afford so he can feel like he’s a part of you. So in every video we had some Chevy trucks and some Lambos. The white tees made it so when you went to the concert you could fit in. We had a whole culture of people showing up to our videos in d*ckies and white tees. Like, that’s what they do, that’s what I want to do, and it’s affordable. I can buy a hundred white tees.

“Right now, when you shoot a video, they paint a picture of this kid you don’t even know but the video makes it look like that he already made it. It’s out of touch. I’m like, Damn, don’t nobody live average? The greatest thing in the world that showed us that was Trinidad Jame$. When he came out with that video everybody was trying to figure out what they loved about this song. It’s dude with no shirt, rubbing a puppy in a basket. I’m like, ‘That’s everyday life for a lot of people.’ They was walking in the video, they wasn’t riding in no bad a*s cars. It just reminds you of what life is because now the picture is painted a million times with every video that you see, like, ‘I made it.’”



Big Tymers f/ Lil' Wayne & Juvenile “#1 Stunna”



Mannie Fresh: “ That was our first time saying, ‘Okay, Baby, we going to let you hold your own.’ So this beat had to be incredibly cool because he was not big on rhymes. The first time we did it, it was alright. We had this dude Lac who always was on our songs and always hung around. Lac was singing that hook, playing around. I was like, 'Man, what the fu*k is that?' He was like, 'I was just saying that because y'all was saying, 'Number One Stunna.' So I was like, that’s the hook.

“All of a sudden, after we did the hook, Lac started rapping. He pretty much had the song but he didn’t want to say it. I’m like, 'Could you please give that to Baby?' and he’s like, 'I’ll help him write.' I always thought the beat had to be way harder than what he was saying but it turned out that it was a super match. Lac rewrote it, came up with the hook, and it was incredible.

“It was that toss-up point with Baby. ‘Do I really want to rap? Am I sure that this song going to happen?’ I’m like, 'Dude you gotta take that "I’ma winner" approach. You can’t be like, "I’m going to do this but I don't know." The missing element was before our homeboy Lac. Once he started putting his pieces on, Baby felt good about it.”


Last edited by Bill Wallace; 11-19-2019 at 09:15 PM..
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 3 weeks ago '14        #2
Bill Wallace  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x4 OP
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Big Tymers “Still Fly”




Mannie Fresh: “Big Tymers saved Cash Money when Juvenile left. 'Still Fly' was one of the biggest songs. Nobody seen that coming. It was a number one song. Cash Money always had great-selling albums, but we never had a song that peaked [that high] on Billboard. [Ed. Note—“Still Fly” peaked at No. 11 on the Hot 100 while “Back That Thang Up” peaked at No. 15 and “Bling Bling” peaked at No. 14.]

“Real talk, that right there blew Baby’s head up. He was like, 'Oh my God, we’re the greatest. Juvenile can’t top us, Wayne can’t top us. We peaked at number one we’re the Big Tymers!' At the time, that’s what Cash Money needed. People were like, 'Oh sh*t, what they gone do? Juvenile’s gone.' That song came out of nowhere and lasted for a long time. You could drop it at a party and people would go crazy.

“At the time, I was trying to save the label. What’s crazy is, everybody hated that song. They was like, 'I don’t know what he’s doing in there, he talking about "everything in his mama name.’’' [Laughs.] I was at Universal telling them this is the one and they were like, ‘Baby said he don’t know what you got going on, you just did the song and he don’t think that’s it.’ I truly had to f*ght for that song.

“Every lyric in that hook is how people really live, that’s what made the song huge. It don’t matter who you are, where you from, it’s like that was really me. [Laughs.] Everything that he’s saying in this hook is really me and everybody’s been there. Even when nobody was thinking that way, I was thinking that way. I was always thought you had to balance it out, it’s not all just shiny.

“Usually, all our songs prior to that, I mixed. I didn’t mix that song. If I’m not mistaken, a young engineer in Miami mixed it but he turned out to be a good dude because he mixed a lot of songs after that. If I’m not mistaken, his name was Sean C. I was trying different things, I wanted to do something different with the 808s. What made me want to do it like was this UGK song 'Let Me See It,' The 808s on that was kind of like [mimics the 808’s 'boom boom']. At the time, nobody was paying attention to it but I thought it was a great idea. I liked what he did with the 808’s, so I kind of did my own twist to that on 'Still Fly.'”



Big Tymers f/ Tateeze, Boo & Gotti “Oh Yeah”




Mannie Fresh: “The song came to be just from saying ‘Oh yeah!’ Like you ask your mom something and she say, 'Oh yeah!' [We thought], What if 'oh yeah' was in the middle of everything? People always say ‘oh yeah.’ You could remind somebody of something and they could be like, 'Oh yeah.' [Laughs.]

“The same thing with 'Drop it like it’s hot.' That came from a ‘70s pimp movie we were watching, I believe it was The Mack. This dude was like, 'You better have my fu*king money and when you bring it, you drop it like it’s hot.' We was like, 'Damn did you just hear that?' That’s cool. 'Drop it like it’s hot!' [Laughs.] It was some sh*t that we started saying everyday. I was like damn why do we keep saying that? It would be a cool hook.”



Juvenile f/ Baby “Bounce Back”




Mannie Fresh: “‘Bounce Back’ was one of those songs that was designed for him. He was like, ‘You like this?' I’m like, 'Dude this beat right here is you, I know it’s you.' We were going through it and he was like, 'I don’t know about them beats' and I’m like, 'I got you.'

"When Juvenile left Cash Money, I didn’t panic. When it all happened, I didn’t talk to Juvie. An article came out and Juvenile said some things and I was salty like, 'Damn, your problem was with Baby, it wasn’t with me.' When I finally got to talk to him, he told me his reasoning and I’m like, ‘Okay, that’s understandable.’ But I wasn’t panicking. This what we do, we make records. If we can’t do that, then we’re not a company.

“I could feel the pressure from Baby and them, I’m not going to lie, like, maybe this could be it and it made me feel like I really wanted to win. I’m like, ‘I know y'all nervous because three or four stories get out and people are saying ‘Juvie is gone, y'all are done.' But we going to keep on making records, we good, let’s go.’

“Not to discredit Juvenile because he was a big part of the success of Cash Money, but I’m like this label been around before him and it’s going to be around after him. If y'all going to smooth it out, smooth it out, and if not then move forward. He came back and, right off the bat, the album jumped off."



Lil Wayne “Go D.J."




Mannie Fresh: “'Go DJ' was a song that was done way before. It didn’t sound like that, but it was a phrase that UNLV used to say about me. They said it on one of their earliest songs, saying, 'Go DJ, that’s my DJ. Mannie Fresh, that’s my DJ. Wayne was like, 'I remember this song when I was growing up. They played it in the clubs. They used to always say ‘Go DJ, that’s my DJ.’ Can I use that?' I’m like, 'Yeah, it’s basically my song.’ Like I said, Wayne always went back to stuff that people would forget about.

“When he did the song, it absolutely made no sense to me. I thought it was going to be about some DJing sh*t. He was like, 'Can you do the hook?' So I did the hook and the beat and I was like, 'Damn dude, you just rapping your a*s off on this song but you never made no reference to nothing about the DJ.' It was one of them moments like, 'Dude you gotta trust me too.' I’m like, 'I’m going to let you have this one.'

“Before he even did the rap, I did the hook and thought he was going to say some incredible sh*t about DJs. I was telling Baby, 'This ‘Go DJ’ thing going to be big. We’re going to send it to every DJ that plays our music in that market and give them their little five minutes of a fame. Send them a camcorder, let them record their show, and we’re going to edit all those clips in the video.’ I hear the song and I’m like, ‘You’re not talking about no DJs or none of that.' [Laughs.] He’s like, 'I think your idea is great but I don’t think it’s going to work.' So I’m like let’s just see what happens. Wayne was like, 'I’m really on some rapping sh*t. That’s what you told me you wanted, that’s what it’s going to be.'



Young Jeezy f/ Mannie Fresh “And Then What”




Mannie Fresh: “Jeezy was hot mixtape wise. Def Jam was like, 'How do we get you to go mainstream? We gotta get you with Mannie Fresh. He knows the science of how to get the streets, how to get the norm, and get you on the radio, and it won’t be corny.' He was really worried like, 'I really love the streets but I don’t want to sound corny.' I was like, 'Dude, you’re not going to be corny just trust me.'

“When you’re young you don’t understand this. He’s like, 'I got the hottest mixtape in the streets.' But in the numbers world, that does not mean nothing. We just signed you to a major label deal, you’re giving away a mixtape but we’re trying to sell some records. After talking with them I told them you can have the streets and appeal to other people. I’m like, 'I’m the white t-shirt dude that got a sense of humor. It’s nobody else you can go to to get it across.'

“So when we were doing the song and I was saying, 'Boom boom clap, boom boom clap' and there was a guy in there that was saying, 'Jeezy, you gotta tell him to take that out, it sounds a little corny.' I’m just like, 'Jeezy, this is going to be the biggest part of this song. It’s alright, just have a little sense of humor.' When the song came out and people were singing that part whenever he did it, he got it.

“I was glad Jeezy understood what I was saying. It’s not going to offend anybody by me saying 'boom boom blap' on your song. He was like, 'I didn’t think it was really that much thought into it.' I’m like, 'Sometimes you got to think about how to win everybody. The whole reason your label is getting me, they’re trying to get you to win everybody. You’re going to have something that everybody likes.’”



T.I. “Top Back”




Mannie Fresh: “I knew Tip from the beginning. When we was recording in Atlanta, early Cash Money, Tip had a small underground following. I’m like, 'This dude T.I., this is y'all Juvenile.' When Juvenile left Cash Money I was trying to get them to sign T.I. I brung him to meet Baby and everything. But Baby and them really didn’t see T.I. being a big artist. But I always thought he was a big artist before he blew. So we always stayed in touch. Tip was just like, 'Thank you for bringing me over trying to get the deal.’

“In the midst of me leaving Cash Money, T.I gets word. He was one of the first people that reached out, 'Come on. Let’s do this. Let’s get this song in.' I did one song called ‘The Greatest’ with him before 'Top Back' on the album before that. I went and visited the dude in jail and he did ‘Top Back’ while he was on house arrest. I had no intentions of it being a single. He was like, 'This a standout song.' It proved Mannie can make it without Cash Money. He did Jeezy and he did T.I.

"I had a big hit with T.I. and Warner Brothers came at me, but Cash Money would send a letter like, 'Nobody can touch Mannie.'

“I was able to produce but I couldn’t get out of my contract right then and there. I’m like, 'Well damn, I want to change the world right now.' I wanted to do my thing and I was really bent on getting a whole group of young kids and doing something crazy. But every time I wanted to do it, I would get blocked by Cash Money.

“When I was with Tip, I was doing back-to-back songs that were hits. We had a Chevy commercial on the Super Bowl and he was like, 'Mannie, you my go-to guy. You’re welcome here.' I had people like that who had my back. I could’ve gone with Grand Hustle but I could never do it because of what was going on with Cash Money.”



G.O.O.D. Music “The One”




Mannie Fresh: “I did the drums on it. Honestly, we had much better songs than that, but that’s Kanye’s thing. So many cool things that were scrapped. It was a good idea but it wasn’t executed right because it was like going, 'Hey dude, this is what you’re hiring me for but you won’t let me do it.' I really felt like Kanye would have got it being a producer like, 'Just let this dude do what he do.'

“It’s a weird thing when you do something and ten more people come behind you. That’s not what it sounded like yesterday and they’re like, 'We let so and so.’ You’re like, 'Why?' Even artists are like, 'It was good how it was. That made no sense at all.' But it was his thing. You gotta trust your people. You can’t run a company and you want to do it all. Why are you employing anybody if you don’t trust them? I feel like he had a good idea but it was way too much going on.

“When the idea first happened, it was so much hype. All you gotta do is live up to what you’re saying, just make good music. At the time, you had Maybach Music and you had Cash Money. So in a sense, the world is ready for something new. I thought G.O.O.D Music was going to be that next big thing, have that seven-year run and things was going to be crazy.

“I thank Kanye for giving me the opportunity and the paycheck. But I thank God that I was a much older artist, more seasoned, because I was like, 'I’m good. I’ll be a freelance producer. I don’t think I’m ready to jump in with nobody right now.' I had been on those situations where I did it how I did it because I really thought G.O.O.D Music could have been something incredibly cool, but it’s got to be like, let these people do what they want to do. You’re that boss dude now, stand back and let them do that.”



Yasiin Bey & Mannie Fresh's OMFGOD Album







"Mannie Fresh: “We damn near done. It’s hard as hell to record with dude. Anybody that knows Mos, knows dude is the craziest. He’s got a heart of gold but he’s the hardest dude in the world to track down. The other day, we were talking about Jay Electronica, like, 'We got to get this verse from Jay Electronica.' I’m like, 'Okay I’m ready. Where is Mos?' I hear sh*t like everybody else, I’m like, 'He got kicked out of the country?!'"]Mannie Fresh: “We damn near done. It’s hard as hell to record with dude. Anybody that knows Mos, knows dude is the craziest. He’s got a heart of gold but he’s the hardest dude in the world to track down. The other day, we were talking about Jay Electronica, like, 'We got to get this verse from Jay Electronica.' I’m like, 'Okay I’m ready. Where is Mos?' I hear sh*t like everybody else, I’m like, 'He got kicked out of the country?!'

“We definitely have songs. A lot of times, I’m this person right now, I’m impatient. I’m ready to put it out but I have to go through his lawyer. There have been times where I said I’m going to put this out and next thing I know his people surface. I’m like, 'Ya'll have been missing for a month', and they’re like, 'You didn’t say nothing', and I’m like, 'I don’t know where dude is.'

“Dude just surfaces. When he does, he’s ready to work. Everybody says, 'You’re the most patient person in the world that’s worked with him.' I’ve done the songs in bits so it’s like, 'When I see you, I’m going to record you. I’ll build around you. I can’t be in the studio with you for a long time, so give me the lyrics and I’ll build songs.'”
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 3 weeks ago '14        #3
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 3 weeks ago '05        #4
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 Bill Wallace said
Big Tymers ďStill FlyĒ




Mannie Fresh: ďBig Tymers saved Cash Money when Juvenile left. 'Still Fly' was one of the biggest songs. Nobody seen that coming. It was a number one song. Cash Money always had great-selling albums, but we never had a song that peaked [that high] on Billboard. [Ed. NoteóďStill FlyĒ peaked at No. 11 on the Hot 100 while ďBack That Thang UpĒ peaked at No. 15 and ďBling BlingĒ peaked at No. 14.]

ďReal talk, that right there blew Babyís head up. He was like, 'Oh my God, weíre the greatest. Juvenile canít top us, Wayne canít top us. We peaked at number one weíre the Big Tymers!' At the time, thatís what Cash Money needed. People were like, 'Oh sh*t, what they gone do? Juvenileís gone.' That song came out of nowhere and lasted for a long time. You could drop it at a party and people would go crazy.

ďAt the time, I was trying to save the label. Whatís crazy is, everybody hated that song. They was like, 'I donít know what heís doing in there, he talking about "everything in his mama name.íí' [Laughs.] I was at Universal telling them this is the one and they were like, ĎBaby said he donít know what you got going on, you just did the song and he donít think thatís it.í I truly had to f*ght for that song.

ďEvery lyric in that hook is how people really live, thatís what made the song huge. It donít matter who you are, where you from, itís like that was really me. [Laughs.] Everything that heís saying in this hook is really me and everybodyís been there. Even when nobody was thinking that way, I was thinking that way. I was always thought you had to balance it out, itís not all just shiny.

ďUsually, all our songs prior to that, I mixed. I didnít mix that song. If Iím not mistaken, a young engineer in Miami mixed it but he turned out to be a good dude because he mixed a lot of songs after that. If Iím not mistaken, his name was Sean C. I was trying different things, I wanted to do something different with the 808s. What made me want to do it like was this UGK song 'Let Me See It,' The 808s on that was kind of like [mimics the 808ís 'boom boom']. At the time, nobody was paying attention to it but I thought it was a great idea. I liked what he did with the 808ís, so I kind of did my own twist to that on 'Still Fly.'Ē



Big Tymers f/ Tateeze, Boo & Gotti ďOh YeahĒ




Mannie Fresh: ďThe song came to be just from saying ĎOh yeah!í Like you ask your mom something and she say, 'Oh yeah!' [We thought], What if 'oh yeah' was in the middle of everything? People always say Ďoh yeah.í You could remind somebody of something and they could be like, 'Oh yeah.' [Laughs.]

ďThe same thing with 'Drop it like itís hot.' That came from a Ď70s pimp movie we were watching, I believe it was The Mack. This dude was like, 'You better have my fu*king money and when you bring it, you drop it like itís hot.' We was like, 'Damn did you just hear that?' Thatís cool. 'Drop it like itís hot!' [Laughs.] It was some sh*t that we started saying everyday. I was like damn why do we keep saying that? It would be a cool hook.Ē



Juvenile f/ Baby ďBounce BackĒ




Mannie Fresh: ďĎBounce Backí was one of those songs that was designed for him. He was like, ĎYou like this?' Iím like, 'Dude this beat right here is you, I know itís you.' We were going through it and he was like, 'I donít know about them beats' and Iím like, 'I got you.'

"When Juvenile left Cash Money, I didnít panic. When it all happened, I didnít talk to Juvie. An article came out and Juvenile said some things and I was salty like, 'Damn, your problem was with Baby, it wasnít with me.' When I finally got to talk to him, he told me his reasoning and Iím like, ĎOkay, thatís understandable.í But I wasnít panicking. This what we do, we make records. If we canít do that, then weíre not a company.

ďI could feel the pressure from Baby and them, Iím not going to lie, like, maybe this could be it and it made me feel like I really wanted to win. Iím like, ĎI know y'all nervous because three or four stories get out and people are saying ĎJuvie is gone, y'all are done.' But we going to keep on making records, we good, letís go.í

ďNot to discredit Juvenile because he was a big part of the success of Cash Money, but Iím like this label been around before him and itís going to be around after him. If y'all going to smooth it out, smooth it out, and if not then move forward. He came back and, right off the bat, the album jumped off."



Lil Wayne ďGo D.J."




Mannie Fresh: ď'Go DJ' was a song that was done way before. It didnít sound like that, but it was a phrase that UNLV used to say about me. They said it on one of their earliest songs, saying, 'Go DJ, thatís my DJ. Mannie Fresh, thatís my DJ. Wayne was like, 'I remember this song when I was growing up. They played it in the clubs. They used to always say ĎGo DJ, thatís my DJ.í Can I use that?' Iím like, 'Yeah, itís basically my song.í Like I said, Wayne always went back to stuff that people would forget about.

ďWhen he did the song, it absolutely made no sense to me. I thought it was going to be about some DJing sh*t. He was like, 'Can you do the hook?' So I did the hook and the beat and I was like, 'Damn dude, you just rapping your a*s off on this song but you never made no reference to nothing about the DJ.' It was one of them moments like, 'Dude you gotta trust me too.' Iím like, 'Iím going to let you have this one.'

ďBefore he even did the rap, I did the hook and thought he was going to say some incredible sh*t about DJs. I was telling Baby, 'This ĎGo DJí thing going to be big. Weíre going to send it to every DJ that plays our music in that market and give them their little five minutes of a fame. Send them a camcorder, let them record their show, and weíre going to edit all those clips in the video.í I hear the song and Iím like, ĎYouíre not talking about no DJs or none of that.' [Laughs.] Heís like, 'I think your idea is great but I donít think itís going to work.' So Iím like letís just see what happens. Wayne was like, 'Iím really on some rapping sh*t. Thatís what you told me you wanted, thatís what itís going to be.'



Young Jeezy f/ Mannie Fresh ďAnd Then WhatĒ




Mannie Fresh: ďJeezy was hot mixtape wise. Def Jam was like, 'How do we get you to go mainstream? We gotta get you with Mannie Fresh. He knows the science of how to get the streets, how to get the norm, and get you on the radio, and it wonít be corny.' He was really worried like, 'I really love the streets but I donít want to sound corny.' I was like, 'Dude, youíre not going to be corny just trust me.'

ďWhen youíre young you donít understand this. Heís like, 'I got the hottest mixtape in the streets.' But in the numbers world, that does not mean nothing. We just signed you to a major label deal, youíre giving away a mixtape but weíre trying to sell some records. After talking with them I told them you can have the streets and appeal to other people. Iím like, 'Iím the white t-shirt dude that got a sense of humor. Itís nobody else you can go to to get it across.'

ďSo when we were doing the song and I was saying, 'Boom boom clap, boom boom clap' and there was a guy in there that was saying, 'Jeezy, you gotta tell him to take that out, it sounds a little corny.' Iím just like, 'Jeezy, this is going to be the biggest part of this song. Itís alright, just have a little sense of humor.' When the song came out and people were singing that part whenever he did it, he got it.

ďI was glad Jeezy understood what I was saying. Itís not going to offend anybody by me saying 'boom boom blap' on your song. He was like, 'I didnít think it was really that much thought into it.' Iím like, 'Sometimes you got to think about how to win everybody. The whole reason your label is getting me, theyíre trying to get you to win everybody. Youíre going to have something that everybody likes.íĒ



T.I. ďTop BackĒ




Mannie Fresh: ďI knew Tip from the beginning. When we was recording in Atlanta, early Cash Money, Tip had a small underground following. Iím like, 'This dude T.I., this is y'all Juvenile.' When Juvenile left Cash Money I was trying to get them to sign T.I. I brung him to meet Baby and everything. But Baby and them really didnít see T.I. being a big artist. But I always thought he was a big artist before he blew. So we always stayed in touch. Tip was just like, 'Thank you for bringing me over trying to get the deal.í

ďIn the midst of me leaving Cash Money, T.I gets word. He was one of the first people that reached out, 'Come on. Letís do this. Letís get this song in.' I did one song called ĎThe Greatestí with him before 'Top Back' on the album before that. I went and visited the dude in jail and he did ĎTop Backí while he was on house arrest. I had no intentions of it being a single. He was like, 'This a standout song.' It proved Mannie can make it without Cash Money. He did Jeezy and he did T.I.

"I had a big hit with T.I. and Warner Brothers came at me, but Cash Money would send a letter like, 'Nobody can touch Mannie.'

ďI was able to produce but I couldnít get out of my contract right then and there. Iím like, 'Well damn, I want to change the world right now.' I wanted to do my thing and I was really bent on getting a whole group of young kids and doing something crazy. But every time I wanted to do it, I would get blocked by Cash Money.

ďWhen I was with Tip, I was doing back-to-back songs that were hits. We had a Chevy commercial on the Super Bowl and he was like, 'Mannie, you my go-to guy. Youíre welcome here.' I had people like that who had my back. I couldíve gone with Grand Hustle but I could never do it because of what was going on with Cash Money.Ē



G.O.O.D. Music ďThe OneĒ




Mannie Fresh: ďI did the drums on it. Honestly, we had much better songs than that, but thatís Kanyeís thing. So many cool things that were scrapped. It was a good idea but it wasnít executed right because it was like going, 'Hey dude, this is what youíre hiring me for but you wonít let me do it.' I really felt like Kanye would have got it being a producer like, 'Just let this dude do what he do.'

ďItís a weird thing when you do something and ten more people come behind you. Thatís not what it sounded like yesterday and theyíre like, 'We let so and so.í Youíre like, 'Why?' Even artists are like, 'It was good how it was. That made no sense at all.' But it was his thing. You gotta trust your people. You canít run a company and you want to do it all. Why are you employing anybody if you donít trust them? I feel like he had a good idea but it was way too much going on.

ďWhen the idea first happened, it was so much hype. All you gotta do is live up to what youíre saying, just make good music. At the time, you had Maybach Music and you had Cash Money. So in a sense, the world is ready for something new. I thought G.O.O.D Music was going to be that next big thing, have that seven-year run and things was going to be crazy.

ďI thank Kanye for giving me the opportunity and the paycheck. But I thank God that I was a much older artist, more seasoned, because I was like, 'Iím good. Iíll be a freelance producer. I donít think Iím ready to jump in with nobody right now.' I had been on those situations where I did it how I did it because I really thought G.O.O.D Music could have been something incredibly cool, but itís got to be like, let these people do what they want to do. Youíre that boss dude now, stand back and let them do that.Ē



Yasiin Bey & Mannie Fresh's OMFGOD Album







"Mannie Fresh: ďWe damn near done. Itís hard as hell to record with dude. Anybody that knows Mos, knows dude is the craziest. Heís got a heart of gold but heís the hardest dude in the world to track down. The other day, we were talking about Jay Electronica, like, 'We got to get this verse from Jay Electronica.' Iím like, 'Okay Iím ready. Where is Mos?' I hear sh*t like everybody else, Iím like, 'He got kicked out of the country?!'"]Mannie Fresh: ďWe damn near done. Itís hard as hell to record with dude. Anybody that knows Mos, knows dude is the craziest. Heís got a heart of gold but heís the hardest dude in the world to track down. The other day, we were talking about Jay Electronica, like, 'We got to get this verse from Jay Electronica.' Iím like, 'Okay Iím ready. Where is Mos?' I hear sh*t like everybody else, Iím like, 'He got kicked out of the country?!'

ďWe definitely have songs. A lot of times, Iím this person right now, Iím impatient. Iím ready to put it out but I have to go through his lawyer. There have been times where I said Iím going to put this out and next thing I know his people surface. Iím like, 'Ya'll have been missing for a month', and theyíre like, 'You didnít say nothing', and Iím like, 'I donít know where dude is.'

ďDude just surfaces. When he does, heís ready to work. Everybody says, 'Youíre the most patient person in the world thatís worked with him.' Iíve done the songs in bits so itís like, 'When I see you, Iím going to record you. Iíll build around you. I canít be in the studio with you for a long time, so give me the lyrics and Iíll build songs.'Ē


motherfu*king YES!!!! props forever @
-8   

 3 weeks ago '14        #5
Bill Wallace  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x4 OP
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Lil Wayne “I Miss My Dawgs”




Mannie Fresh: “We had a meeting when we was doing Tha Carter. It was like we have to come out with something that’s incredible and is going to set this label up for years, where people will be like, 'It wasn’t a fluke.' I never felt that way, but we always had people like, ‘Can they do it again? Can they change their sound?’

“I’m like, ‘Tha Carter is going to define rap for a while.’ Wayne was like, 'You really think?' I’m like, ‘I really do. It’s got to be something incredible. This needs to be your album, that’s the one where you can listen to these songs from one to whatever else is on there and this a jamming a*s album.’ He was like, 'I’m going to put my thinking cap on.’ We drew from so many things from when we were doing that. We brought in his mom like, ‘What do you think somebody your age would want to hear?’ She gave us all of these great ideas. That’s where I came up with the Al Green song, 'Way More Flyer Than You.'

“I asked his mom to give me some songs that she could play in her age group and she was like, 'Frankie Beverly and the Maze.' I’m like we’re not going to be able to clear that, he ain’t letting nobody use nothing. I think she might have said something that’s traditional New Orleans, I’m like, 'Nah, New Orleans knows that song, nobody else.' Then she said the Al Green song and I’m like we can do that one and I felt like we covered that part. I was bringing in people and asking them about generations: In your era, what was jamming? What do you think? What can we do to make this something that’s unforgettable?

“When we did 'I Miss My Dawgs' and he was talking about The Hot Boyz. He was like, 'I want to do this but I don’t want to get Baby upset.' He was like, 'I don’t want the streets to be mad at me and I don’t want it to be taken the wrong way.' I’m like, 'If it’s what you want in your heart, then do it.' At the time it, everybody left so it was a hard thing to do. Baby and them wasn’t affiliated with none of these people. Even though they were on a label, he was about to make a song saying sincerely like, 'I miss ya’ll' and I’m like all of this needs to happen.”
+13   

 3 weeks ago '05        #6
JohnnyCage202 
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Fuuuuuuck all that!

Mannie I wanna hear the story on these three:











+32   

 3 weeks ago '17        #7
Sucka Repellent  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
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+2   

 3 weeks ago '05        #8
Tha Boss 
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@
+2   

Top 10 most slapped recently  3 weeks ago '19        #9
Big Tymerz  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x11
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That lil Wayne verse on back that azz up Classic
+5   

 3 weeks ago '14        #10
Bill Wallace  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x4 OP
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 JohnnyCage202 said
Fuuuuuuck all that!

Mannie I wanna hear the story on these three:












Juvenile f/ Hot Boys & Big Tymers ď400 DegreezĒ




Mannie Fresh: ďA lot of people donít know, the Universal Cash Money deal was really based off of Big Tymers sales. It wasnít based off of Juvenile because Juvenile wasnít even there yet. I was just like, 'Itís only so much we could do, but if we put Juvenile at the front of this, thatís yaíll rapper.' We were just creative game spitters, we can talk sh*t, but we got somebody that can go toe to toe. So I was like, 'Get this dude and letís do his album.' Thatís why 400 Degreez had to be that album and the songs had to be incredible.

ďI had like a cheesy vocoder, and I was just trying to figure out, 'What can I do? I want to do something with the vocoder, something.' '400 Degrees' started out with me just doing that, 'You donít want to fu*k with me, hot boy, hot hot...' and it was originally a Hot Boys song. I was playing around in the studio, and Juvenile was like, 'I got the song Ď400 Degreez.í' He was like, 'It would be crazy if you could do that,' and I was like, 'OK, letís do that.'

ďNow even if you pay attention to 400 Degreez, some of his bars are crazy, and we kind of gotta meet where heís at. We just would run the drum machine first and then go back and do the keyboard parts while heís rapping in the other room. Thatís why a lot of the songs off 400 Degreez got crazy count points to them, like itís 14 bars and the hook comes in. At the time, the only flaw that Juvenile had was he didnít know how to count bars. He was just, 'I RAP.' Some of the verses would be 14 bars, some would be eight, and Iím like, ĎWeíll just work around you.íĒ
+22   

 3 weeks ago '05        #11
JohnnyCage202 
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My n*gga!

+4   

 3 weeks ago '14        #12
Bill Wallace  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x4 OP
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 Sucka Repellent said

+7   

 3 weeks ago '14        #13
Bill Wallace  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x4 OP
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 Tha Boss said
motherfu*king YES!!!! props forever @

+10   

 3 weeks ago '14        #14
Bill Wallace  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x4 OP
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 Big Tymerz said
That lil Wayne verse on back that azz up Classic

+12   

 3 weeks ago '08        #15
J_Clarity13 
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+2   

 3 weeks ago '05        #16
rippac4 
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Dope sh*t
+2   

 3 weeks ago '14        #17
Bill Wallace  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x4 OP
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 JohnnyCage202 said
My n*gga!

+1   

 3 weeks ago '19        #18
Tweezy 
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Mannie fresh made cash money records
+25   

 3 weeks ago '19        #19
Anomic 
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Mannie Fresh > All

Louisiana been had the best producers:
KLC, Mannie Fresh, Bass Heavy, Mouse on the Track, The whole Beats By the Pound, etc.
Detroit has some cold beat makers too, but the boot got the top spot easy.
+13   

 3 weeks ago '16        #20
Kansas City Mac 
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fu*k a "Thug Girl" them hoes can come suck my d*ck
-Birdman

I never caught this diss
+13   

 3 weeks ago '17        #21
NinetyThree94  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x6
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Remember hearing "Top Back" for the first time. That sh*t was so damn hard.

400 Degreez my favorite Mannie beat tho. Legend.
+6   

 3 weeks ago '16        #22
BobbiHeadRagTop  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
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Bet
+1   

 3 weeks ago '06        #23
Badnewz100  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
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Can't front I was one of those dudes who hated southern rap growing up. As I got older it took over and now half my catalog is southern rap hell I even listen to Ghetto Mafia

With that being said I didn't appreciate Mannie Fresh till later in his career. The Carter 1 Fresh was in his bag, dude was snappin on that album. Baby fu*ked up not paying homey.
+12   

 3 weeks ago '08        #24
Skilly713 
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"That’s why a lot of the songs off 400 Degreez got crazy count points to them, like it’s 14 bars and the hook comes in. At the time, the only flaw that Juvenile had was he didn’t know how to count bars. He was just, 'I RAP.' Some of the verses would be 14 bars, some would be eight, and I’m like, ‘We’ll just work around you.’”

This why Mannie the truth. CM messed us out a lot of knock and collabs I still think he underrated in comparison to the majority of popular producers both old and new. Swizz, Timbaland, Pharrel just to name a few.
+6   

 3 weeks ago '06        #25
~ KiLLa KaZi ~ 
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Need to hear the story on this muhphucka .. one of the hardest beats eva .. Rip Stone




+17   



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