The 50 Best Atlanta Rap Songs

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The 50 Best Atlanta Rap Songs
 

 
http://www.complex.com/music/2013/04/the-50-best-atlanta-rap-songs/


Inferior lyricism. Unsophisticated beats. That sh-t is just too damn slow.

Hard as it is for anyone under 25 to believe, there was a time when Atlanta rap was the red-headed stepchild of hip-hop. New York's rap purists will look down their noses at anything, but they reserved particular scorn for rap from the South, and rap from the ATL in particular.

It's 2013, though, and the A's status as one of the capitals of hip-hop was confirmed long ago (depending on which year you're talking about, it might be the capital of hip-hop). It's like that now—you better go on and get the hump up out your back now. Atlanta is arguably the most layered music community in hip-hop. It cranks out at least three new stars every year. The producers create a new sound every other season. A new dance pops up every summer. If hip-hop's early days were informed by New York, and its '90s heyday involved a vacation to Cali, for the past 10 years it's been influenced more by the capital of Georgia than any other place in the world.

Atlanta's rap community engenders a fierce pride, and it's a scene that's both insular and accepting. Where one song may be a hit on the radio, there's another song that's even bigger in the club. Where an artist may be known in industry circles, there's also an underground champion with just as much—sometimes even more—clout.

This list could've easily been 100 songs; hell, it could've been 200. But we had to draw the line somewhere. So, from J.D. to T.I., from Bonecrusher to Kilo Ali, from MC Shy-D to the most consistently innovative act in rap history (yeah, they're on here a couple times), this is just the cream of the north Georgia crop. From Bankhead to College Park to Zone 4, these are the 50 Best Atlanta Rap Songs.

50. Freak nasty "Da Dip" (1996)

Atlanta dance songs that started off as underground favorites more often than not ended up being pop hits after a few months. Freak nasty's "Da Dip" started off in the clubs, landed on the radio and ended up getting regular rotation on MTV. The original video was filmed in a high school gym (which sounds kind of creepy now). But by the time the song made it to the big time, the label edited him out of the video.

49. Outkast "Ms. Jackson" (2001)

Stankonia leaked almost two months before it hit the stores, and most regular cats were already over this song by the the time the retail version dropped. But the heartfelt subject matter and pop melodies made it the group's biggest crossover hit, and probably you mother's favorite Outkast song.

48. Yung Joc "It's Goin' Down" (2006)

This is one of those songs that you just had to be there for to see how hard it hit when it did. Not since Naughty By Nature had people waving their hands in unison to "Hip Hop Horray" had a song made people do the same move at the same time.

47. Shawty Lo "Dunn Dunn" (2008)

"Say he from the Westside, well gotdamn...it must be two sides." L-O didn't say T.I.'s name in this song, but Tip took enough offense to it that he retaliated. Beyond that, "Dunn Dunn" gave native Atlantans a certain sense of pride as the city began to be overcrowded with transplants. It was pretty much a jab at anybody claiming to be from a certain neighborhood when they weren't.

46. Rocko "Umma Do Me" (2007)

Rocko is your favorite Atlanta rapper's favorite rapper. When this song dropped, every star at the time—from T.I. to Young Jeezy—was harassing DJs to play it in the club, even if it meant cutting their own song short.

45. Raheem the Dream "The Most Beautiful Girl" (1998)

Raheem the Dream was one of the first rap stars in Atlanta, and he has plenty of songs that people will call their favorite. But, to this day, if Raheem comes out to do a show, this is the one that people come to hear. Sampling Prince's "Beautiful Ones" and putting it over a bass beat made this one of those songs that makes it hard for a girl to turn down a dance. Critics love to say rap is a young man's game, but the entire time we enjoyed Raheem's music, he was older than most of his peers—and better.

44. 2 Chainz "Spend It" (2011)

Not sure if was from a Treach/Naughty By Nature-style demand to go solo, or frustration from Def Jam's mishandling of Playaz Circle, but Tity Boi decided it was time to ride alone. Before "Spend It," he already had a few hood hits and WorldStar favorites. But this ode to squandering officially launched the 2 Chainz brand and took over Atlanta radio the minute it was dropped.

43. MC Shy D "Bust This" (1987)

If you were an aspiring DJ in Atlanta, odds are this is the song that either made you want to be one, or taught you how to be one. To this day elements from this record are sampled and borrowed throughout Atlanta. Shy-D makes a living spinning other people's records in clubs around town now, but just about every person behind some turntables in the city was inspired by this song.

42. Ludacris f/ Mystikal & I-20 "Move bi-ch" (2002)

"Move bi-ch, get out the way hoe!" was a chant that people used to yell in the club, the park, or any event where it was too crowded to move. Sometimes people followed directions, other times people stood still and suffered the consequences, just like the imaginary foe on the song. The hood made it a hot line, but Ludacris made it a hot song.

41. Arrested Development "Tennessee" (1992)

The song title had many thinking they were repping the Volunteer state at first, but Arrested Development's song and video about slavery became one of the first crossover rap hits to come out of the A-Town. It was also one of the last times a song came from the city without automatically being labelled an "Atlanta" song.

40. Youngbloodz "Damn!" (2003)

When this song first came out, it seemed like the whole world stopped in its tracks. Crunk was already a staple in Atlanta's musical DNA, but this Lil Jon-produced song bust the floodgates wide open and made it hard for any other "crunk" song after to top it. Again, Youngbloodz found a way to carve their own niche in a scene that was getting very crowded. "Damn!" also brought the "Eastside Stomp" to national prominence.

39. Young Jeezy "Get Ya Mind Right" (2005)

Depending on who you ask, Young Jeezy's emergence in the Atlanta rap scene was either a good or bad thing. He came at a time when the streets (and the hustlers in them) didn't really have a voice. But he also brought plenty of opulence, nihilism and those BMF guys to the party with him. "Get Ya Mind Right" was his foot in the door. Easily one of the most quotable Jeezy songs to date.

38. Dem Franchize Boyz "Lean Wit It, Rock Wit It" (2006)

D4L's Bankhead neighbors Dem Franchize Boys managed to gain more popularity for doing pretty much the same thing, primarily because they created the literal how-to-dance instructional "Lean Wit It." As crazy as it may sound, they were actually more "lyrical" than their counterparts, and were versatile enough to make other songs that had nothing to do with dancing.

37. Kilo Ali feat. Big Boi "Love In Ya Mouth" (1997)

Kilo was one of Atlanta's first rap stars, and when he hooked up with Organized Noize in 1995, it looked like he was on his way to starting a new, bigger chapter in his career. "Love In Her Mouth" was one of the many gems that came from his classic album Organized Bass. It may also be the nastiest song to ever make it on the radio.

36. Tag Team "Whoomp! (There It Is)" (1993)

"Whoomp! (There It Is)" is another example of a phrase coming from the streets that people rushed to make a song out of. Tag Team's version struck gold and became one of the biggest songs of all time. "Whoomp! There It Is" damn near became a more popular phrase than "amen." One of the first examples in Atlanta hip-hop of a song being bigger than the artist who made it. Somewhere in the world, somebody is still eating off of selling t-shirts with the phrase plastered on it.

35. Jermaine Dupri f/ Ludacris "Welcome to Atlanta" (2002)

The city of Atlanta was already enjoying success in the music industry, but this song officially planted a flag and drew a line in the sand to seperate itself from every other city in the world. Ludacris wrote the perfect opening rap verse, and JD followed by name dropping just about every neighborhood and nightclub that was popping at the time.

34. T.I. "Rubberband Man" (2003)

T.I. was a burgeoning star up to this point, but this song is what actually made those "King of the South" claims sound valid. T.I. got the beat from David Banner for a little over a handshake and a thank you, but the song wound up making both of them rich in the long run. When he dropped the video with a Diddy cameo, the game was over at that point.

33. Travis Porter "Make It Rain" (2010)

Travis Porter garnered 2 Live Crew comparisons early in their career, but this song is what validated them. "Make It Rain" had women from corporate America in the club living out stripper fantasies for all of four minutes. The song showcased the young trio's ability to make raunchy records that were catchy enough to make people forget just how explicit they were.

32. Unk "Walk It Out" (2006)

Once a decade or so, Atlanta is good for putting out a few new dances at the same time. "Walk It Out" dropped at the height of the snap music craze, and it gave people an alternative move to bust out at the party.

31. Success-N-Effect "Roll It Up" (1989)

Songs like this probably had a bigger effect on kids in the Atlanta Public School system than any D.A.R.E. speech or McGruff the Crime Dog visit. Instead of rhyming, Success-N-Effect used a casual street conversation, bookended by a hoo, to try and get dope and its peddlers of the streets. It's actually a pretty revolutionary song structure when you think about it: positive music that was far from corny.

30. Purple Ribbon All-Stars f/ Big Boi "Kryptonite (I'm on It)" (2006)

"Kryptonite" dropped at a time when the city was either dancing with a snap or rapping about the trap. It was also the first piece of music with an Outkast member on it to drop since the group went diamond with Speakerboxx/The Love Below. So naturally, people were thirsty for something different. It was also one of the last songs Big Boi and k!ller Mike appeared on together before their years-long beef that followed.

20 comments for "The 50 Best Atlanta Rap Songs"

 5 years ago '12        #2
TheThreadLord 1776 heat pts1776 OP
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29. Hitman Sammy Sam "Intoxicated" (1999)

Gucci Mane is not the first rapper from Atlanta to constantly find himself in jail or similar random shenanigans. That honor would go to Hitman Sammy Sam. The flagship artist on indie powerhouse Big Oomp Records, Sam was the hood star that nobody invited to the industry parties. To be fair, he didn't need to be there: the streets loved and supported him enough.

28. Ghetto Mafia "Straight From the DEC" (1997)

Atlanta rap music made the SWATs (Southwest Atlanta) and Bankhead household names. But acts coming from Decatur and East Atlanta were always treated like bastard children on a national scale. That is, until underground vets Ghetto Mafia broke through with the bluesy "Straight From The Dec." This was the first major song to let people know that all the music in Atlanta wasn't coming from the South or West sides of town.

27. Young Dro f/ T.I. "Shoulder Lean" (2006)

Dro had already been an Atlanta rap veteran, having signed with Raheem the Dream's Tight2Def records and Rocko's Rocky Road records before finally landing at T.I.'s Grand Hustle imprint. His simple-but-"player" dance, the "shoulder lean," had people who were too cool to move their feet actually doing something in the club. And, of course, it also had people looking for girls who had girlfriends.

26. Gucci Mane f/ Mac Bre-Z "Pillz" (2006)

By the time Gucci's second album Hard To k!ll came out, many thought that he was already on his way out of rap relevancy as his rival Young Jeezy soared. But thanks to singles like "Freaky Gurl" and its street compliment "Pillz," Gucci showed that he "might be" able to build a career crafting club-ready songs with undeniable hooks

25. Future "Tony Montana" (2011)

Formerly known as "Meathead"—that's right—Future re-introduced himself with a slew of mixtapes, finally breaking ground through an appearance YC's "Racks On Racks." With perfect timing, he followed it up with his own smash "Tony Montana." His autotuned faux-Cuban accent doesn't sound like a hit at first, especially since he's talking more than he is rapping. But when you realize rap is fascinated by all things Scarface, it all makes sense.

24. Young Jeezy "Trap or Die" (2005)

Piggy-backing off Diddy's "Vote Or Die" campaign, Jeezy created a phrase that was a little more relatable to the people who would be directly affected by the decisions of those taking office. While DJ Toomp is usually credited with creating the "trap" sound alongside T.I. a couple of years prior, Shawty Redd's contributions to Jeezy's sound cannot be overlooked. The tape that shared this song's name made Jeezy a star and DJ Drama the icon of an era.

23. Waka Focka Flame "Hard In Da Paint" (2010)

Nobody expected the guy who made "O Let's Do It" to duplicate that success. But Waka managed to outdo himself by following up with a song that just about everybody has in their workout iPod playlist. It also saw the formation of the hit-making tandem of Waka and Lex Luger, that in some people's eyes rivaled the chemistry between T.I. and DJ Toomp.

22. KP & Envyi "Swing My Way" (1998)

Women are usually the central topic of songs coming from Atlanta, but "Swing My Way" was one of those rare times when women were the ones doing the courting. Coming out at a time when bass music was approaching its twilight, KP & Envyi managed to squeeze out one last dance hit before everything turned crunk.

21. DG Yola "Ain't Gon Let Up" (2006)

"I just don't give a fu*k" is usually said in a context of desperation. But somehow, DG Yola turned into a motivational track on "Ain't Gon Let Up." Coming out of the notorious Allen Temple neighborhood was enough of a feat for the young rapper. Making a hit song was just icing on the cake.

He was signed to Grand Hustle for a hot minute off the strength of this song, but let's say that his personality didn't exactly mesh with some of his labelmates, and he parted ways with the label in a matter of weeks after being signed. Regardless, if this reggae-infused tune didn't make you want to change your life, we feel sorry for you.


20. D4L "Laffy Taffy" (2005)

When this Casio-driven song dropped, D4L was blamed for single-handedly k!lling hip-hop, primarily because of its lack of lyrical dexterity and the infectious dance that came with it. Because, you know, hip-hop has never had silly songs with dances attached to them...right?

What people fail to realize is that in real life, D4L had more street cred than most rappers who claim to have it. They were from the roughest part of town, and were actually trying to depict the complete opposite to make it out. The song was also appreciated in the sense that it came from the hood at a time when Atlanta music was getting very glossy.
 5 years ago '12        #3
TheThreadLord 1776 heat pts1776 OP
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19. Cool Breeze "CreAtine" (1999)

Sure, Cool Breeze's "Watch For The Hook" video got love on TV, but anybody in Atlanta, or who bought and owns this album, will tell you that "CreATine" is the hardest song on East Point's Greatest Hit. This was a perfect example of Breeze's ability to talk street ish without cursing; when this song dropped everybody in the street was shouting "I got people who...."

18. OutKast "Elevators (Me & You)" (1996)

"Elevators" is the song that really showed you how much Outkast were actually outcasts. Sounding nothing like they did their debut, the ATLiens took a complete 180 with this song, but it worked. It was also the first signal of Outkast's desire to produce their own songs and not rely solely on Organized Noize.

There was an early controversy with this track; Big Boi gave the song to Greg Street ahead of time to play on the radio, and LaFace Records promptly sent C&D letters to the DJ, asking that he not play it any longer, at least until they were ready to officially release it.


17. Crime Mob "Knuck If You Buck" (2004)

Far from the first youth act to come out of Atlanta, Crime Mob is the first one to really capture what teens had been doing in the clubs for years. Up to this point, the only young rappers to come out of the Atlanta music machine were Kris Kross and Lil Bow Wow. Unlike them, Crime Mob didn't have a Jermaine Dupri bankrolling their promo. This song literally went from the lunch room table, to the streets, to the radio.

16. Baby D f/ Lil C "Eastside vs. Westside" (2000)

Atlanta's Hip Hop scene has always been one that practiced unity, but this 2000 club anthem turned every dance floor into a civil war whenever the DJ played it. Atlanta never really had a gang problem, but people would rep their neighborhoods and high schools hard. This song only added fuel to those flames.

One of the many hood classics from indie powerhouse Big Oomp Records, this one breathed new live into the label as they tried to move on beyond Sammy Sam's many legal troubles. "Eastside vs. Westside" still starts f!ghts to this day.


15. YoungBloodz f/ Big Boi "85" (1999)

For awhile, it was hard being a rap duo not named Outkast when it came to Atlanta hip-hop. But Youngbloodz, with their even less-polished image and thicker accents, managed to stay out of that shadow, and even shined on the same song as Big Boi himself. Any dude with a car and a girlfriend on the Southside knew the story on this song all too well; the police loved pulling people over over around those parts.

14. Diamond f/ D-roc "Bankhead Bounce" (1995)

As with most dance phenomenons in Atlanta, the "Bankhead Bounce" birthed a slew of songs looking to act as the official soundtrack. Diamond and D-Roc's version was the first to make a big impact, due mainly to having a music video that received endless airplay on local show American Rap Makers. Outkast's "Benz Or Beamer" video, which appeared on the New Jersey Drive soundtrack, introduced the dance to the country, but Diamond and D-Roc (who later become one half of the Ying Yang Twinz) get credit for making it a local phenomenon first.

13. Witchdoctor "Holiday"

Do you remember the first time you heard this beat? By sounding like some Hip Hop voodoo, Witchdoctor's "Holiday" had everybody feeling a little more thankful everyday they woke up. His voice and unpredictable flow really made it sound like he was casting a spell. True DF fans will tell you that A.S.W.A.T. Healin Ritual is among the best albums from the crew. This track was produced by Emperor Searcy, co-founder of Lil Jon's BME label.

12. Playa Poncho and L.A. Sno "Whatz Up Whatz Up" (1995)

Just like the "Bankhead Bounce" and "Whoomp There It Is," "Whatz Up Whatz Up" wound up being a phenomenon that every other artist tried to take credit for by recording their own versions of it. With ATL bass legend DJ Kizzy Rock on the beat, Playa Poncho and L.A. Snow's version wound up being the one that rose above the rest, although it doesn't hurt that Jermaine Dupri supported it. The song and its video capture a time when people would rather go to the park and chill, rather than trying to be seen in a nightclub VIP section.

11. Goodie Mob "Cell Therapy" (1995)

The first time you head the opening piano riff to this song, you just knew sh*t was going to be different from that point on.

Goodie Mob debuted in a guest appearance on Outkast's first LP, but "Cell Therapy" set them apart from Outkast immediately. They dove head-first into government conspiracy theories and the type of social commentary that rarely made it past the barbershop.

The rumor behind the making of this song goes as follows: As Busta Rhymes peeked in on Goodie Mob's session one night when they were working on their album, he slipped them the book Behold A Pale Horse. They flipped through it and wound up creating their manifesto. The beat, tone and content made even the hardest hardhead "use that tool between your two shoulders."


10. Ludacris "Southern Hospitality" (2000)

Nobody will admit it now, but when Ludacris dropped his first single, "What's Your Fantasy," many people in Atlanta's music community thought it was a cute song, but were secretly waiting for the radio personality-turned-rapper to fail and disappear. For a while top radio station V-103 didn't even play his music because of his connection to in-town rival Hot 97.5.

But when he came back with the Neptunes-produced "Southern Hospitality," he proved that he was here to stay. While he was always a talented wordsmith, it was songs like this that proved that Luda's biggest selling point was his personality. It's also an early example of his ability to use a different flow on just about every song he would record.

Luda would go on to make plenty hits in the years that followed, but this is the one that still stands the test of time, and marks the moment when Atlanta began to realize what it had in him.


9. Bonecrusher f/ k!ller Mike & T.I. "Never Scared" (2003)

After appearing on both Gangsta Grillz 6 and T.I. & P$C's In The Streetz 2 mixtapes, Never Scared graduated from a hood club anthem to THE club anthem of 2003.

With Atlanta's crunk movement on the cusp of becoming a national phenomenon, "Never Scared" not only increased the subgenre's popularity, but also showed that cats could actually rhyme over those types of tracks, instead of just screaming and chanting.

In addition, this song alone set Bonecrusher, T.I., and k!ller Mike on their way to becoming stars, and made DJ Drama's Gangsta Grillz the new mixtape brand to respect. This, combined with Mississippi neighbor David Banner's "Like A Pimp," burst open the flood gates for the "New South" take over."


8. Kilo Ali "America Has a Problem Cocaine"

Kilo is the reason most of the people on this list rap—or were even able to have careers—in the first place. One of the first voices from the hood (Bankhead) to even make it on the radio, "America Has a Problem Cocaine" was a PSA disguised as a bass record.

It also comes off as a look in the mirror on the artist himself, as cocaine was one of the main reasons why Kilo's career was derailed, and ultimately prevented him from prospering more outside of Atlanta. If you were a kid growing up in Atlanta around the time, though, this is probably the first rap song you ever memorized word for word.


7. Pastor Troy "No Mo Play In GA" (1999)

There was a time when Pastor Troy had not just the city of Atlanta but the entire state of Georgia eating out of the palm of his hand. "No Mo Play In GA" is what started it.

Initially, the song blew in smaller Georgia cities and HBCU campuses. Since the album was funded and recorded when Troy was based in Augusta, Georgia, it took a minute for the song to be accepted in Atlanta. But once it did, it made history.

While the song was aimed at Master P, it dropped at a time when Atlanta youth were going through a slight identity crisis, trying to look and talk like there were signed to No Limit and/or Cash Money. This song was a successful attempt to re-instill that city pride.


6. Kris Kross "Jump" (1992)

Although they were still in elementary school when they "made it," Kris Kross' "Jump" was such a big record that it superseded any "kiddie rap" labels that could be thrown at young rappers that came after them. While rap had known pop success prior to "Jump," Kriss Kross took it to unprecedented levels: they had people wearing their clothes backwards and Michael Jackson summoning them for music video cameos.

If you were from Atlanta and went out of town, you were almost guaranteed to be asked "do you know Kris Kross?" Kriss Kross never matched the success of "Jump" (although "Tonite's The Night" was a modest follow-up success in 1995), but to their credit, not too many young rappers after them did either.


5. MC Shy D "Atlanta That's Where I Stay" (1988)

Hip Hop had always been alive in Atlanta, but it wasn't until Shy-D dropped "Atlanta That's Where I Stay" that people put away those Knicks and Yankees hats and started rocking Hawks and Braves gear. They gained a little more pride in using their own voice and identity.

While Shy D himself moved to Atlanta from New York, he won respect by respecting the turf he was on. Atlanta had not crafted its own sound yet, but the fact that he was shouting out the city on a track was music to everybody's ears. At one time, the song was so big that Shy D was performing after Hawks games, getting as much play in the A as Run DMC and Whodini.


4. Goodie Mob f/ Cool Breeze & Big Boi "Dirty South" (1996)

What started out as a song about Atlanta's notorious "RED DOG" (Run Every Drug Dealer Out of Georgia) police unit, political corruption, street codes on the Southside of Atlanta wound up becoming a theme song for the entire region to relate to.

Rapping over little more than a bassline, Cool Breeze's prophecies, Big Gipp's analysis and Big Boi's sh*t-talking still define the city more than 15 years later. Crazy thing about the song is that only one Goodie Mob member actually spits a verse; the song's message is bigger than the group of artists on it.

While Atlanta and Southern Hip Hop are more mainstream these days, this song acts as a time capsule, a reminder of a time when rappers weren't afraid to tell the ugly truth.


3. Lil Jon & the East Side Boyz f/ Ying Yang Twins "Get Low" (2003)

Lil Jon had plenty of Atlanta classics under his belt by the time "Get Low" came out. Songs like "Who U Wit," "Couldnt Be A Better Player," and "Bia, Bia" cemented his status as a pioneer in crunk—and at cranking out memorable hooks. But when he managed to make the world (and even Dave Chappelle) scream the song's "Aww Skeet Skeet Muthafu*ka, Aww Skeet Skeet Gotdamn!" like it was cool, you knew he had officially taken over.

Jon was known for producing songs that made dudes f!ght and scared women from the dancefloor. But this track did the opposite, making girls do all kinds of X-rated things that we wish camera phones had been around to capture.The raunchy single became a staple at college parties across the country, and made Jon an unexpected pop star. The song also helped Ying Yang Twinz become household names. Yes, that really happened.


2. T.I. "What You Know" (2006)

T.I. isn't afraid to tell you that he's the sh*t. But when this song came out, you really had to admit, "yeah, buddy, might be the sh*t."

By the time "What You Know" came out, the self-proclaimed King of the South had already defended his crown against all challengers, and was looking to become the king of rap, period. It was only right that his album King kick off with a bold declaration in the form of a simple question, daring what was left of his doubters to find someone better.

The Bankhead Ambassador always knew how to make a hit song, but this is he and longtime producer DJ Toomp at their collective finest. T.I.'s purposefully drawn-out flow and reserved c*ckiness embodied the demeanor of the typical dude repping the A and made it something more.


1. Outkast "Player's Ball" (1994)

"Player's Ball" was originally recorded as a Christmas song, hence the sleigh bells in the beat. But when the song and video were released, it became the moment where you swore you were looking at two dudes you had just seen at Greenbriar Mall on national television.

That's because they were. Big Boi and Dre (pre-3000) drew a line in the sand when they came out talking about pimps, Cadillacs and "king sh*t" when the rest of hip-hop was preoccupied with being either Five Percenters or Gangsters. At first, even some Atlantans would take their time accepting 'Kast, as they were still under the spell of Wu-Tang Clan or Snoop Doggy Dogg. But once residents saw that the duo was repping them the right way, they took them in as their own.

Outkast's accents were unfamiliar to outsiders, but anybody that lived in the A understood exactly what they were saying. But even then, they stuck out from the jump. 'Kast would build the rest of their career standing apart, not only from other Atlanta artists, but from the rest of the world, period. While a few rappers came before OutKast, mark this moment as the time when Atlanta was officially on the map.




no k!ller mike

souljaboy not on the list

Pastory Troy #7
 04-13-2013, 03:13 PM         #4
DailyOperator 
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no rosa parks?
 04-13-2013, 03:23 PM         #5
*Missy* 
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Expected to see some more Kilo (Freak How You Want It) and more Oomp Camp,but pretty good list. Vice Versa should be on there to.


I remember "juke ya boy" by born threat was my sh*t to
 04-13-2013, 03:32 PM         #6
*Missy* 
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Damn-Youngbloodz surprised thats not on there either

What about Ho sit down by Maceo that was hot one
 5 years ago '10        #7
ThRoWeD MaN LaN 2 heat pts
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Ms. Jackson is in the high 40s???!? No way.
 5 years ago '10        #8
Gouki 9 heat pts
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How 2Chainz passed ANY Outkast song is beyond me.

This list is WOAT.
 5 years ago '10        #9
DurtySoufReppin 76 heat pts76
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 *Missy* said:
Damn-Youngbloodz surprised thats not on there either

What about Ho sit down by Maceo that was hot one
YoungBloodz is up there #40

and that DG Yola

Only a few south regions know about that. I'm from Chattanooga and when that sh*t comes on in the club


but Outkast Elevators and Ms Jackson should be way higher
 5 years ago '12        #10
CaliSteppin 33 heat pts33
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What You Know
 5 years ago '04        #11
ATLDOPEBOI30 73 heat pts73
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 *missy* said:
expected to see some more kilo (freak how you want it) and more oomp camp,but pretty good list. Vice versa should be on there to.


I remember "juke ya boy" by born threat was my sh*t to
wat u kno bout juke ya boi
 5 years ago '07        #12
neeko21 
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 ATLDOPEBOI18 said:
wat u kno bout juke ya boi
Snap music movement was vicious Get Rich Clique bunnyhop.
 5 years ago '11        #13
Kobane 163 heat pts163
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Just one Pastor Troy song?

No Mo Play n GA #7?


Last edited by Kobane; 04-13-2013 at 06:48 PM..
 5 years ago '11        #14
Kobane 163 heat pts163
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Remember that n*gga "maceo" or sum sh*t?

"Hit me on my nextel chirp"
 5 years ago '05        #15
WCIB 111 heat pts111
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 Kobane said:
Remember that n*gga "maceo" or sum sh*t?

"Hit me on my nextel chirp"
That song is a legitimate classic track in my iTunes.
 5 years ago '10        #16
beast mode 25 heat pts25
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list is weak.
 5 years ago '10        #17
beast mode 25 heat pts25
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 Kobane said:
Remember that n*gga "maceo" or sum sh*t?

"Hit me on my nextel chirp"
hoe sit down was dope too
 5 years ago '04        #18
ATLDOPEBOI30 73 heat pts73
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 Kobane said:
Remember that n*gga "maceo" or sum sh*t?

"Hit me on my nextel chirp"
hell yea my cuzz went to high school wit em and said he was coo, he on that new future mixtape though
 5 years ago '11        #19
GrindPOWER$ 390 heat pts390
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 GeorgiaBoyTool said:
Whoa wasn't Archie Eversole from the A? Me and my cousin was singing "We Ready" today

yeah this song was on point when it drop

i think they put songs on there people was feeling outside the A
 5 years ago '04        #20
zhiggeman 4 heat pts
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what is this fu*kery... you got dg yola but no other strip club banga? you got shy-d on here but not shake it? realy? when i know that sh*t was what put the A on the map when jordan was still at NC!!! how you leave off baby baby which made him a star, but how you forget da organization can't stop no playa? or noo jazzy pha songs really..
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