"If Snoop Were Saying Something, That Negro Would Be Dangerous"

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 5 years ago '12        #1
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"If Snoop Was Saying Something, That Negro Would Be Dangerous"
 

 
I watch PBS almost religiously. I enjoy its programming more than cable and other mainstream programming. One of my favorite shows is Tavis Smiley's. Recently, he interviewed Snoop (Lion), and the subject came up about the amount of power mainstream rappers would have if they rapped about positive subject matter.


[video - click to view]


PBS hasn't posted the full interview yet, but I thought this snippet could be a good conversation starter. I'm interested in reading others' opinion on the subject.

Personally, this has been my philosophy for the past two decades. I always wondered how much conditions could improve, especially in the hood, if things like money, cars, hoes, and violence weren't glorified in mainstream rap music, seemingly making it okay to engage in that type of behavior. We can talk about the separation between entertainment and reality, but if you don't think music influences a culture -- positively and negatively -- then you probably don't get out much.

EDIT: PBS just dropped the full interview. You can check it out here:
[pic - click to view]

 Video: Rapper Snoop Lion | Watch Tavis Smiley Online | PBS Video


Last edited by Bravo Golf; 03-14-2013 at 08:43 AM..

139 comments for ""If Snoop Were Saying Something, That Negro Would Be Dangerous""

 5 years ago '05        #2
WCIB 116 heat pts116
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i guess the question is how many people listen to the music as it's currently constituted and lead productive and healthy lives? i do think that music is highly influential. that's obvious. but are kids in Chicago going to stop k!lling each other if Chief Keef stops making the music he makes? i doubt that. it might help, but is that change going to create mothers and fathers and healthy conditions for raising children? no. i feel people use music as an excuse too often, but i see both sides. it's not healthy for kids to hear the sh*t most of these rappers say, but that goes back to parenting.
 03-14-2013, 05:59 AM         #3
Nasty Neighbor 
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you cant just up and change the culture with a few songs unless youre pac
 03-14-2013, 06:27 AM         #4
dlettern 
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 WCIB said:
i guess the question is how many people listen to the music as it's currently constituted and lead productive and healthy lives? i do think that music is highly influential. that's obvious. but are kids in Chicago going to stop k!lling each other if Chief Keef stops making the music he makes? i doubt that. it might help, but is that change going to create mothers and fathers and healthy conditions for raising children? no. i feel people use music as an excuse too often, but i see both sides. it's not healthy for kids to hear the sh*t most of these rappers say, but that goes back to parenting.
I'm following you.....partially. Sure, music does create violence, but it does inspire violence. Drugs and immaturity are the main reasons for the deterioration of the family structure. Hip Hop has created a culture where its cool to be ignorant. Its all by design
 03-14-2013, 06:34 AM         #5
A6249CF 
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record companies promote this sh*t. We'll never see a black nationalist rapper like pac, because they dont want that

mainstream rappers sell their soul to sell poison to the black youths and create a side show for other races to embrace while not being a part of.

People will say "no one wants to hear positive rap". Believe me when I say, through advertising and media the record companies can manipulate what the masses like.

But can we honestly imagine Record companies co-operating with artists to empower black people for the greater good? hmmmmm
 5 years ago '12        #6
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 WCIB said:
i guess the question is how many people listen to the music as it's currently constituted and lead productive and healthy lives? i do think that music is highly influential. that's obvious. but are kids in Chicago going to stop k!lling each other if Chief Keef stops making the music he makes? i doubt that. it might help, but is that change going to create mothers and fathers and healthy conditions for raising children? no. i feel people use music as an excuse too often, but i see both sides. it's not healthy for kids to hear the sh*t most of these rappers say, but that goes back to parenting.
 YI-Drizzy said:
you cant just up and change the culture with a few songs unless youre pac
I agree with both of you. Music is only a small portion of it. The issues plaguing these communities started long before hip-hop's creation. In fact, it was the issues that created hip-hop.

But what gets me is how far the movement has derailed. There was a period of time when conscious hip-hop was well-represented in the mainstream. But then, as rap grew in popularity, corporations sought to exploit it like corporations tend to do, and the positive voices within the music became silenced. Sure, they still made records, but they no longer had the main avenue that is the radio to have their voice and lyrics heard by the masses. And commercial rap just regressed from there.

It would be one thing if all the social ills plaguing the black community ceased to exist long before then and rap music could be taken as simply a means of entertainment. Middle class white kids, for example, can look at rap music as merely entertainment. Their realities and the lifestyles portrayed in commercial rap music aren't the same. To them, it's like watching a movie, only aurally.

For black youth in the inner city, on the other hand, it's the only examples they see or hear in the media in terms of the black experience. Subconsciously, they feel that this is how they are suppose to act and who they are suppose to be. There are influences that can counterbalance this, like good parenting (as the first quoted post alludes to) and mentoring, but the vast majority of these kids receive neither of the two.

The power of media and imagery is strong, and that's why I feel if commercial rap music was positive and uplifting, it could vastly improve the self-perception (and perception) of black youth. Unfortunately, like the second post I quoted alluded to, there are very few artists who have the influence to change a culture that quickly through their music.


Last edited by Bravo Golf; 03-14-2013 at 06:47 AM..
 5 years ago '12        #7
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 mR ReZiW said:
record companies promote this sh*t. We'll never see a black nationalist rapper like pac, because they dont want that

mainstream rappers sell their soul to sell poison to the black youths and create a side show for other races to embrace while not being a part of.

People will say "no one wants to hear positive rap". Believe me when I say, through advertising and media the record companies can manipulate what the masses like.

But can we honestly imagine Record companies co-operating with artists to empower black people for the greater good? hmmmmm
Exactly.

This is how America became such a consumer-driven society, through television, radio, internet, and other media. Companies saw this and devised complex marketing plans to influence the masses to buy their products, whether they needed them or not. Commercial music works the same way.
 5 years ago '07        #8
240ka 49 heat pts49
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Will you n*ggas stop mentioning pacs angry and confused a.ss. How old are y'all bc y'all act like that n*gga did something for our community when he didn't
 5 years ago '08        #9
Arson 84 heat pts84
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 mR ReZiW said:
record companies promote this sh*t. We'll never see a black nationalist rapper like pac, because they dont want that

mainstream rappers sell their soul to sell poison to the black youths and create a side show for other races to embrace while not being a part of.

People will say "no one wants to hear positive rap". Believe me when I say, through advertising and media the record companies can manipulate what the masses like.

But can we honestly imagine Record companies co-operating with artists to empower black people for the greater good? hmmmmm
Lupe got on his public enemy lite sh*t and n*ggas shunned him and said he got too preachy. So you already know if Universal put the machine behind somebody that's WAAAAAAAAAY more serious about that sh*t than Lupe as far as hammering a message in their music goes, they'd be wasting their money because people wouldn't rock with it. Even the n*ggas that people are big on as the "saviors" or "breaths of fresh air" in hip-hop are still only sprinkling a couple positive rap bars in with the same money, car, ho raps.
 03-14-2013, 07:09 AM         #10
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 Arson said:
Lupe got on his public enemy lite sh*t and n*ggas shunned him and said he got too preachy. So you already know if Universal put the machine behind somebody that's WAAAAAAAAAY more serious about that sh*t than Lupe as far as hammering a message in their music goes, they'd be wasting their money because people wouldn't rock with it. Even the n*ggas that people are big on as the "saviors" or "breaths of fresh air" in hip-hop are still only sprinkling a couple positive rap bars in with the same money, car, ho raps.
is it more a case of black people never rocking with lupe as oppose to his msg? I would say lupe hasnt got a high enough profile in the black community to turn heads

but hypothetically in the midst on 99, if DMX,or 50 in 03. covered the same content as lupe would they have turnt heads? imho i think so
 5 years ago '13        #11
HipHopFactz 452 heat pts452
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Pac came on the scene rapping about Brenda and Keep Ya Head Up and on the flipside defending urself against cops so forth

you won't get that in this day and age, but i think that has to do more to do with upbringing and teachings handed down from his family circle, but at the same time he was stuck within a new generation who didnt believe in politics or reading, so you have to try and mix in to the circle and indentify with the youth, which opened a can of worms in his life.

The FBI had an entire file on him dating from 91 to 96, the vice president at the time mentioned his name specifically at the GOP convention and linked him as a catalyst to cop kilings and demanded his records and videos be banned.

The legacy of his music has reached the middle east, arab sping, remote parts of africa so forth.

To be a serious danger you have to be all things to all men, thats how you unite folk, thats Lupes stumbling block, you are on the outside looking in as oppose to on the inside looking out, so it comes off as overly preachy and people just turn their ears away and listen to Rick Ross.

On the flipside someone like Snoop built his name off being a gangsta rapper


Last edited by HipHopFactz; 03-14-2013 at 07:20 AM..
 5 years ago '12        #12
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 240ka said:
Will you n*ggas stop mentioning pacs angry and confused a.ss. How old are y'all bc y'all act like that n*gga did something for our community when he didn't
I would say Pac did something inspiring for the community, but it gets overshadowed because for every positive thing he did, he negated it with something negative. You can't deny that he had the influence to inspire positively when he chose to do so. Remember "Brenda's Got a Baby," "Dear Mama," "Keep Ya Head Up," "So Many Tears," and "Changes" just to name a few? Now imagine if "How Do U Want It," "I Get Around," and his public persona when he signed to death Row never existed. You mean to tell me he wouldn't be a positively influential artist?


Last edited by Bravo Golf; 03-14-2013 at 07:28 AM..
 5 years ago '12        #13
OldBusiness 164 heat pts164
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 240ka said:
Will you n*ggas stop mentioning pacs angry and confused a.ss. How old are y'all bc y'all act like that n*gga did something for our community when he didn't
I think you might be showing your age.....because he did inspire some brothers to do better for themselves...Hell my uncle-my moms youngest brother did a 4 year bid in the 90s....dude fell in love with Pacs message and straight up changed his life.....went from being a deadbeat dad ex con to getting custody of his 2 daughters, got a degree, and now works a little desk job making 60K a year....All the while having Pac verses tatted on his arms and his back


Snoop could be very powerful...Hes one of the few voices in hip hop thats respected no matter where he goes...Snoop could show up anywhere in the world right now and he wouldn't have any issues...no problems...people love him worldwide...He does it all the damn time....If he took that power and put it into a message he could seriously impact the lives of some people. Instead he kinda just enjoys the fact that hes accepted anywhere without really doing to much of anything lol...Imagine if someone with a message like Pac or Nas enjoyed the international acclaim on a level like Snoop?
 5 years ago '09        #14
Chalky 314 heat pts314
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 240ka said:
Will you n*ggas stop mentioning pacs angry and confused a.ss. How old are y'all bc y'all act like that n*gga did something for our community when he didn't

[pic - click to view]




[pic - click to view]



I know some smart a.ss is gonna say well these aren't sh*t but you guys got to remember how influential Pac music was back in the day, His Music Gave People Hope and Strength to Continue in the crooked a.ss World
 5 years ago '12        #15
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 GameTheory said:
THE PROBLEM is getting positive music to sound good.

Its still entertainment from day one.

Reggae has no problem doing this because it sounds SO fu*kING GOOD.

Rap music that does positive music RARELY sounds like anything you'd want to hear more than once so above and beyond message, if its not grabbing ears, we don't want to hear it.

You can't neglect that aspect of the music.
What if a rapper did a positive song using the same production and delivery as any of the popular rappers out today. Are you saying that it would catch on because it sounds good? Are you saying that if Rick Ross rapped about "Real n*ggas Getting Education from the F**king Start" that the song would be popular and open it up for other positive acts to follow?

I would argue that anything can sound good after repeated listens. As much as I dislike Drake, especially that "Started from the Bottom" song, I find myself reciting the lyrics because I hear it so much that it's stuck in my head. I think positive songs could do the same thing with enough spins on the radio.
 5 years ago '07        #16
Playa 70 heat pts70
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It would fall on the listener to decide what they want music to do for them. Most people look to music for emotional escape - not intellectual enlightenment or traditional learning. That's why the club music is so popular or why Adele and Taylor Swift can sell so many records about breakups and sad sh*t. Artists like Immortal Technique, Lupe Fiasco, Truth Universal, or K-Rino do the educational music but their aesthetics don't create enough emotional escape to warrant a good amount of attention.

You have to find the balance between creating emotional response from the beat/delivery as well as educating positively in one way or another through lyrics. This is apparently hard to do.


[video - click to view]

This song finds the balance. It delves into the topic of personal expression and the misconceptions surrounding the artists' demographic. Society has painted them one way without giving them the opportunity to explain themselves fully.

[video - click to view]

This song does it as well. They all shed light on important social topics that politicians and the masses have been misunderstanding for years. The artists not only discuss those topics but allow their angry emotions to show which teaches the listener that they are passionate about what they are speaking on so it must be vital. All of this is done on a dark, groovy beat that makes the listener feel like something is wrong or bad consequenes can result from ignorance. It's like a warning.


Last edited by Playa; 03-14-2013 at 09:10 AM..
 5 years ago '12        #17
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 Nyuzi said:
It would fall on the listener to decide what they want music to do for them. Most people look to music for emotional escape - not intellectual enlightenment or traditional learning. That's why the club music is so popular or why Adele and Taylor Swift can sell so many records about breakups and sad sh*t. Artists like Immortal Technique, Lupe Fiasco, Truth Universal, or K-Rino do the educational music but their aesthetics don't create enough emotional escape to warrant a good amount of attention.

You have to find the balance between creating emotional response from the beat/delivery as well as educating positively in one way or another through lyrics. This is apparently hard to do.


This song finds the balance. It delves into the topic of personal expression and the misconceptions surrounding the artists' demographic. Society has painted them one way without giving them the opportunity to explain themselves fully.

This song does it as well. They all shed light on important social topics that politicians and the masses have been misunderstanding for years. The artists not only discuss those topics but allow their angry emotions to show which teaches the listener that they are passionate about what they are speaking on so it must be vital. All of this is done on a dark, groovy beat that makes the listener feel like something is wrong or bad consequenes can result from ignorance. It's like a warning.
The thing I love about this post is that these examples you posted were from mainstream hip-hop acts. Like I said in another post, there was a time when mainstream hip-hop was edgy but still had a positive message, or at the very least, looked to bring attention to certain issues within the community. I would love to mainstream hip-hop get back to that.
 5 years ago '12        #18
ThePainkiller 356 heat pts356
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 240ka said:
Will you n*ggas stop mentioning pacs angry and confused a.ss. How old are y'all bc y'all act like that n*gga did something for our community when he didn't
Are you dumb or retarded?
 5 years ago '04        #19
skillahmang 2 heat pts
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 240ka said:
Will you n*ggas stop mentioning pacs angry and confused a.ss. How old are y'all bc y'all act like that n*gga did something for our community when he didn't
name me one other rapper that has a center of the arts school, which benefits african american children and underprivileged children.

plus he has foundations,etc. but most rappers with any sense and money do too.


what other rapper dead or alive has a school? who else had the influence to do that for "our" community.

ill wait. name one artist.


Last edited by skillahmang; 03-14-2013 at 09:52 AM..
 5 years ago '13        #20
HipHopFactz 452 heat pts452
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they opening up another one too^

Pac told his mom he wanted to open up a school and she fufilled one of his dreams, dude was huge on education

In his last interview he said he was getting Snoop, Hammer and DPG together for School programme, whereby he and them wud perform at schools for only the kids who were getting good grades...

Aint no mainstream rapper doing that
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