News + Discussions relating to race (no racism)

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 4 years ago '13        #1221
lb99 4 heat pts
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 Damagegadget said:
guy in another thread said thisisht was a conspiracy theory
they used to say the same sh*t bout Tuskegee
 4 years ago '10        #1222
Alerts 222 heat pts222
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 HHS said:
Natural News is full of sh*t

 lb99 said:
remember reading some sh*t bout vaccines and the aids epidemic in africa too. look at all the people who get fukkd up by the hpv vaccine. and saw some sh*t last week bout somebody down in florida that ended up in a coma after getting a flu shot.

 4 years ago '07        #1223
Ham Rove 3520 heat pts3520
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natural news?
Finally, the claim of heretofore unavailable sterility vaccines being secretly administered to Kenyan women relies solely on the a.ssertions made by Kenyan doctors and bishops who oppose the vaccine program. No independent tests have confirmed the doses in question were contaminated in the manner the groups suggest, and no corresponding fertility disruptions in Kenya have emerged to corroborate the claims of surreptitious mass sterilizations
:hattossmoon:
 4 years ago '13        #1224
AB AboutBuildin 983 heat pts983
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Professor Karl Alexander discusses his nearly three decade study that exposes the structural barriers to escaping poverty in Baltimore



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 4 years ago '06        #1225
RAZAH CUTS 6070 heat pts6070
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The Missouri chapter of the Ku Klux Klan is threatening to use “lethal force” against protesters in Ferguson who threaten their safety, equating some demonstrators to “terrorists.”

Frank Ancona, leader of the KKK’s Missouri operations, has been distributing fliers in the metropolitan St. Louis area warning protesters in Ferguson that those who have threatened police officers and their families will be met with violence themselves.

The flier, obtained by Vice News, is addressed to “the terrorists masquerading as peaceful protesters.” It also states that they have “awakened a sleeping giant.”

“You have been warned by the Klu Klux Klan!” it continues. “There will be consequences for your actions against the peaceful, law abiding citizens of Missouri.”

This kind of behavior is not exactly unusual for the KKK, which has circulated similar letters in various cities across the United States. But the delivery of these fliers comes at a particularly sensitive time in Ferguson and the surrounding St. Louis area.

Residents are currently waiting to hear whether or not a grand jury will bring criminal charges against Officer Darren Wilson, the white officer who shot and k!lled an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown. The 18-year-old’s death sparked massive, weeks-long protests, which made headlines around the country after police deployed a number of controversial crowd-control tactics – the use of tear gas and the establishment of a no-fly zone over the city, for example.


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No one knows exactly when the decision will be reached, but reports suggest the process is coming to a close and it could be any day now. Gun sales have spiked in the area, and some businesses have boarded up their storefronts in an attempt to preempt looting. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced earlier this week that the National Guard would be on standby to respond to any reports of violence.

Speaking with the Riverfront Times, Ancona said: “Missouri is definitely on fire right now.” He also stated that the Ferguson protests were a boon for KKK recruiting.

"These Ferguson protesters are the best recruiters since Obama," he said, noting that 50 people joined the group in November alone. "Normally we might hear from 10 people a week in Missouri, and now we're hearing from more like 50 people a week. Sometimes, depending on these news stories, we get 100, 200 calls in a day."

Soon after the new KKK fliers came to the public's attention, Ancona appeared on MSNBC, where he was asked if he was inciting violence.

“No, actually it’s addressing the people who are making these terroristic threats and letting them know that the people of Missouri have rights too,” Ancona said. “There are remedies under the law. The flier, if you read it, it says ‘defend’, it talks about defense. So, in order to defend yourself, that means you’re being attacked.”

Activist Bassem Masri has been called out specifically by the KKK, which claims he threatened police while live-streaming one of the protests. Masri dismissed the accusation to Vice News.

"If they want to perpetuate hate, we can't stop them, but we can surely let them know we ain't going for it," he said. "They are using the KKK to change the narrative to something they want, which is a race war which we are not advocating for, taking the story off [Missouri Governor Jay] Nixon, [St. Louis Country prosecutor Bob] McCulluch, and Darren Wilson."

"It's ok for the KKK to hate folks but God forbid a minority speaks up.”
 11-15-2014, 11:42 AM         #1226
dOwnByLaw310  OP
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"Ku Klux Klan is threatening to use “lethal force” against protesters in Ferguson who threaten their safety"

I wonder what they mean by that?

Supoosedly Michael Dunn "felt" "threatned" by Jordan Davis' (R.I.P.) "loud" music?
 4 years ago '04        #1227
grydlok 38 heat pts38
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 4 years ago '11        #1228
Sin 1477 heat pts1477
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A terrorist organization calling others terrorist
 11-15-2014, 06:25 PM         #1229
Fred Mertz  OP
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Is anyone from Missouri here, let alone Ferguson if not everyone should keep their opinion to themselves and let the chips fall where they may. America needs the entertainment.........











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 4 years ago '10        #1230
ColeWorld 42 heat pts42
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n*ggas are too deep in Missouri they're picking the wrong f!ght
 4 years ago '07        #1231
RubbahBandMayn 6 heat pts
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oh really?
 4 years ago '06        #1232
KFrizzle 296 heat pts296
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A couple weeks ago, The Daily Caller completed its alphabetical tour de force showing that racism has seeped into every nook and cranny of American life including superhero movies, the weather and the very air we breathe.

It was hard, arduous work. Now, some 19 articles later — and still feeling grimy and contaminated from multiple visits to obscure sites like Salon deep in the bowels of the Internet — it’s time to celebrate. It’s time to kick back, relax and enjoy the greatest hits of all the things someone, somewhere has deemed racist.
A is for academic freedom, which is racist according to Sandra Korn, a highfalutin Harvard University student and a columnist for the Harvard Crimson. , Korn unambiguously insisted that the Ivy League school should stop guaranteeing professors and students the right to hold controversial views and should instead only pursue research that strives for “justice” by opposing “racism, s3xism, and heteros3xism.” Korn’s Facebook likes include OccupyHarvard, Students Occupy Boston and Left Futures/Jacobin Reading Group.

B is for the Benghazi select committee. The committee is racist, according to the creative logic of South Carolina Rep. James Clyburn, because it makes President Barack Obama look bad. It’s “the same kind of thing that led to the end of Reconstruction,” Clyburn told NewsOne Now host Roland Martin in May. “I seem to remember our history, when after Reconstruction, when people of color gained political presence throughout the South, they drummed up all kinds of things and indictments and accusations,” the Congressman born in 1940 explained. “They drove these people out of the South. And I see the same kind of efforts to discredit this president.”

C is for coconut bras. In May, administrators at the University of California, Irvine deemed bikini tops made of polished coconut half shells racist after the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity — known since 1894 by the moniker FIJI — hosted a charity fundraiser. The event was called the FIJI Islander party. It featured students dressed in coconut bras and grass skirts. The kerfuffle began when Save Gasaiwai, a UCI student of Fijian descent, complained that the event caused pain to “marginalized” people and reinforced “white male hegemonic structures.”

D is for Duck Dynasty. A&E’s hugely popular reality TV series, which is about a loving family that makes duck calling devices. It isn’t just racist, it’s apparently an agent of white supremacy. about a growing “us versus them culture” totally infesting America, MSNBC’s Michael Eric Dyson said Phil Robertson and his family are “part of a majority white supremacist culture that either consciously or unconsciously incubates hatred toward those who are different.”

E is for ending racism. Though it may sound a little counter-intuitive that the absence of racism would in itself be racist, the brilliant Justice Sonia Sotomayor told American exactly why this is so. Sotomayor made her wise judgment in a dissenting opinion after the Supreme Court ruled the feds can’t force the state of Michigan to engage in racial discrimination. Michigan had passed a proposal mandating race-neutral state policy, which effectively banned affirmative action in that state. that Michigan’s decision to ban a racist policy was really racist, because it “changed the basic rules of the political process in that State in a manner that uniquely disadvantaged racial minorities.”

F is for food poisoning at ethnic restaurants. Such queasiness is racist because, , people who barf after eating and then post restaurant reviews on Yelp “tend to blame restaurants that serve ‘ethnic food’ — that is, preparations particular to culinary traditions originating outside of Europe.”

G is for golf jokes about Barack Obama. Such jokes are racist because, leftist talking heads argue, Republicans make fun of the president too much for golfing all the time instead of doing his job. For example, says Michelle Malkin, after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell ribbed Obama for “working to earn a spot on the PGA tour,” MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell read the hammy quip’s subtext as “Obama equals Tiger Woods equals RACISM.”

H is for hump day. At the University of St. Thomas, a Catholic school in St. Paul, Minn. with a fancy Muslim prayer room, an end-of-the-year Hump Day camel appearance was canceled because some students complained that the event would be racially offensive to cultures of the Middle East. “[T]his program is dividing people and would make for an uncomfortable and possibly unsafe environment,” said a school spokeswoman, .
 4 years ago '06        #1233
KFrizzle 296 heat pts296
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.....
I is for improving a school full of black kids. The Chicago Teachers Union has made it clear to Mayor Rahm Emanuel that it deems attempts to help black students have better schools racist. In March, the Chicago Board of Education announced a plan to turnaround three miserably low-performing schools in predominantly black neighborhoods. The improvement process meant replacing every teacher at the failing schools, which of course irked the union, so it played the race card. “This is an attack on Black schools,” the union declared in an

J is for joking about Obamacare. Finding humor in the healthcare disaster is racist , the c*ckroach of the Internet. In October 2013, the minor site charged that Ted Cruz was practicing “GOP dog-whistle politics at its finest” when he suggested that “Nigerian email scammers” have “become a lot less active lately” because they have “all been hired to run the Obamacare website.” The bloggers at Salon contended that “it’s a short hop from Nigeria to Kenya” and, consequently, Cruz was somehow alluding to conspiracy theories about President Obama’s birth in Kenya. The distance from Kenya to Nigeria is actually about 2,000 miles — farther than the distance from Boston to Dallas. For Salon’s geographically-challenged writers, though, Africa is just a big piece of land filled with people who have black skin.

K is for kicking open a door. In February, a student at Canada’s McGill University was forced to issue a formal apology for emailing a picture of President Obama kicking open a door because some students thought the image was somehow racist. The image was actually an edited .gif, and had been shown by Jay Leno on “The Tonight Show.” It humorously suggests that the president may be fed up with press conferences. McGill student Brian Farnan sent out an email with the .gif and the harmless caption, “Honestly midterms get out of here.” Another student issued a formal complaint against Farnan for committing a “micro-aggression” — the latest phrase of choice for leftist radicals seeking to blame racism for common annoyances suffered by people of all races. Farnan was forced to denounce his heretical email.

L is for “Lord of the Rings”, The journalism that broke the story acknowledges author J.R.R. Tolkien himself probably meant no racist offense. Nevertheless, the Second City newspaper has a.ssured America, the representation of race in the films is problematic because, as usual, men with pasty white skin are the “good guys” and men with other skin colors are the “bad guys.” For example, the piece mentions Aragorn’s warning to King Theoden that Saruman is out to “destroy the world of men.” A more accurate statement, the piece says, would have been “the forces of evil have a.ssembled an army ‘to destroy the world of civilized white men.’”

M is for master bedrooms. Several Washington, D.C.-area homebuilders have stopped using the officious term to describe the biggest bedroom in a new house. The homebuilders have replaced the phrase with various other phrases including “owner’s suite,” “owner’s bedroom” and the totally different words “mastre bedroom,” . The newfound problem is that the word “master” suggests slave masters and males.

N is for not sending children on a field trip to a mosque. In November 2013, the headmistress at a primary school in a small town in England warned parents of children aged 8 to 11 that they would be racist if they did not send their children on a field trip to a nearby mosque. Moreover, kids who did not go would be permanently labeled as racists for the rest of their academic careers. Parents received the stark warning in the form of a letter from Lynn Small, the stern boss of Littleton Green Community School in Huntington, Staffordshire.

O is for opposing Common Core. New York Education Commissioner John King declared as much . He tied the struggles of students facing desegregation back in the day to students facing schools without Common Core now. ”This is about taking responsibility for educating every single child no matter what his or her race, background or economic status,” King said. “By retreating from accountability and allowing children at risk to slip through the cracks, advocates of lower standards deny us the talents of all Americans.”

P is for peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. In November 2013, a public elementary school principal in Portland, Ore. deemed peanut butter and jelly sandwiches racist. Harvey Scott K-8 School principal Verenice Gutierrez said she was concerned because “Somali or Hispanic students” “might not eat sandwiches.” “Maybe they eat torta,” Gutierrez suggested. “Or pita.” Gutierrez also instituted a separate-but-unequal drum class for middle school black and Hispanic boys only. Participants had to be male and could not be white or Asian.

Q is for questioned the genius of a black person. This one is complicated. First, Ta-Nehisi Coates bizarrely claimed that obscure MSNBC talking head Melissa Harris-Perry — who has called the NBA racist — is “America’s foremost intellectual.” Politico reporter Dylan Byers dared to question the absurd statement on Twitter. “Ta-Nehisi Coates’s claim that ‘Melissa Harris-Perry is America’s foremost public intellectual’ sort of undermines his intellectual cred, no?” Beyers had tweeted. Coates then accused Byers of empowering the “machinery of racism.” Byers has “the privilege of being oblivious to questions, of never having to grapple with the everywhere; the right of false naming,” .
 4 years ago '06        #1234
KFrizzle 296 heat pts296
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I is for improving a school full of black kids. The Chicago Teachers Union has made it clear to Mayor Rahm Emanuel that it deems attempts to help black students have better schools racist. In March, the Chicago Board of Education announced a plan to turnaround three miserably low-performing schools in predominantly black neighborhoods. The improvement process meant replacing every teacher at the failing schools, which of course irked the union, so it played the race card. “This is an attack on Black schools,” the union declared in an

J is for joking about Obamacare. Finding humor in the healthcare disaster is racist , the c*ckroach of the Internet. In October 2013, the minor site charged that Ted Cruz was practicing “GOP dog-whistle politics at its finest” when he suggested that “Nigerian email scammers” have “become a lot less active lately” because they have “all been hired to run the Obamacare website.” The bloggers at Salon contended that “it’s a short hop from Nigeria to Kenya” and, consequently, Cruz was somehow alluding to conspiracy theories about President Obama’s birth in Kenya. The distance from Kenya to Nigeria is actually about 2,000 miles — farther than the distance from Boston to Dallas. For Salon’s geographically-challenged writers, though, Africa is just a big piece of land filled with people who have black skin.

K is for kicking open a door. In February, a student at Canada’s McGill University was forced to issue a formal apology for emailing a picture of President Obama kicking open a door because some students thought the image was somehow racist. The image was actually an edited .gif, and had been shown by Jay Leno on “The Tonight Show.” It humorously suggests that the president may be fed up with press conferences. McGill student Brian Farnan sent out an email with the .gif and the harmless caption, “Honestly midterms get out of here.” Another student issued a formal complaint against Farnan for committing a “micro-aggression” — the latest phrase of choice for leftist radicals seeking to blame racism for common annoyances suffered by people of all races. Farnan was forced to denounce his heretical email.

L is for “Lord of the Rings”, The journalism that broke the story acknowledges author J.R.R. Tolkien himself probably meant no racist offense. Nevertheless, the Second City newspaper has a.ssured America, the representation of race in the films is problematic because, as usual, men with pasty white skin are the “good guys” and men with other skin colors are the “bad guys.” For example, the piece mentions Aragorn’s warning to King Theoden that Saruman is out to “destroy the world of men.” A more accurate statement, the piece says, would have been “the forces of evil have a.ssembled an army ‘to destroy the world of civilized white men.’”

M is for master bedrooms. Several Washington, D.C.-area homebuilders have stopped using the officious term to describe the biggest bedroom in a new house. The homebuilders have replaced the phrase with various other phrases including “owner’s suite,” “owner’s bedroom” and the totally different words “mastre bedroom,” . The newfound problem is that the word “master” suggests slave masters and males.

N is for not sending children on a field trip to a mosque. In November 2013, the headmistress at a primary school in a small town in England warned parents of children aged 8 to 11 that they would be racist if they did not send their children on a field trip to a nearby mosque. Moreover, kids who did not go would be permanently labeled as racists for the rest of their academic careers. Parents received the stark warning in the form of a letter from Lynn Small, the stern boss of Littleton Green Community School in Huntington, Staffordshire.

O is for opposing Common Core. New York Education Commissioner John King declared as much . He tied the struggles of students facing desegregation back in the day to students facing schools without Common Core now. ”This is about taking responsibility for educating every single child no matter what his or her race, background or economic status,” King said. “By retreating from accountability and allowing children at risk to slip through the cracks, advocates of lower standards deny us the talents of all Americans.”

P is for peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. In November 2013, a public elementary school principal in Portland, Ore. deemed peanut butter and jelly sandwiches racist. Harvey Scott K-8 School principal Verenice Gutierrez said she was concerned because “Somali or Hispanic students” “might not eat sandwiches.” “Maybe they eat torta,” Gutierrez suggested. “Or pita.” Gutierrez also instituted a separate-but-unequal drum class for middle school black and Hispanic boys only. Participants had to be male and could not be white or Asian.

Q is for questioned the genius of a black person. This one is complicated. First, Ta-Nehisi Coates bizarrely claimed that obscure MSNBC talking head Melissa Harris-Perry — who has called the NBA racist — is “America’s foremost intellectual.” Politico reporter Dylan Byers dared to question the absurd statement on Twitter. “Ta-Nehisi Coates’s claim that ‘Melissa Harris-Perry is America’s foremost public intellectual’ sort of undermines his intellectual cred, no?” Beyers had tweeted. Coates then accused Byers of empowering the “machinery of racism.” Byers has “the privilege of being oblivious to questions, of never having to grapple with the everywhere; the right of false naming,"


Educate yourself. Catch up on TheDC’s entire Alphabet of Racism.


Last edited by KFrizzle; 11-17-2014 at 03:06 PM..
 4 years ago '06        #1235
davon4204 34 heat pts34
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They ain't gonna do sh*t. This ain't the old days.
 11-17-2014, 03:04 PM         #1236
tripleG  OP
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This about to be n*ggas theme song in Ferguson.
 4 years ago '05        #1237
Jazzy Soul 27 heat pts27
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 Fred Mertz said:
Is anyone from Missouri here, let alone Ferguson if not everyone should keep their opinion to themselves and let the chips fall where they may. America needs the entertainment.........











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So people should only be concerned with injustice if it falls within the arbitrarily drawn state lines?


Good to know.
 4 years ago '07        #1238
RubbahBandMayn 6 heat pts
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 tripleG said:


This about to be n*ggas theme song in Ferguson.
That junt hard but I'll rather bump this junt when I'm going all out


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 4 years ago '09        #1239
420Sosa 4 heat pts
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 MohasHendrix said:


The Rules - Making sense of race and privilege
By Lawrence Otis Graham ’83
Published in the October 8, 2014

I knew the day would come, but I didn’t know how it would happen, where I would be, or how I would respond. It is the moment that every black parent fears: the day their child is called a ******.

My wife and I, both African-Americans, constitute one of those Type A couples with Ivy League undergraduate and graduate degrees, who, for many years, believed that if we worked hard and maintained great jobs, we could insulate our children from the blatant manifestations of bigotry that we experienced as children in the 1960s and ’70s. We divided our lives between a house in a liberal New York suburb and an apartment on Park Avenue, sent our three kids to a diverse New York City private school, and outfitted them with the accoutrements of success: preppy clothes, perfect diction, and that air of quiet graciousness. We convinced ourselves that the economic privilege we bestowed on them could buffer these adolescents against what so many black and Latino children face while living in mostly white settings: being profiled by neighbors, followed in stores, and stopped by police simply because their race makes them suspect.

But it happened nevertheless in July, when I was 100 miles away.


The Graham family at home
Family photo: Christine Butler
The Graham family at home
It was a Tuesday afternoon when my 15-year-old son called from his academic summer program at a leafy New England boarding school and told me that as he was walking across campus, a gray Acura with a broken rear taillight pulled up beside him. He continued along the sidewalk, and two men leaned out of the car and glared at him.

“Are you the only ****** at Mellon Academy*?” one shouted.

Certain that he had not heard them correctly, my son moved closer to the curb, and asked politely, “I’m sorry; I didn’t hear you ... ”

But he had heard correctly. And this time the man spoke more clearly. “Only ... ******,” he said with added emphasis.

My son froze. He dropped his backpack in alarm and stepped back from the idling car. Within seconds, the men floored the sedan’s accelerator, honked the horn loudly, and drove off, their laughter echoing behind them.

By the time he recounted his experience a few minutes later, my son was back in his dorm room, ensconced on the third floor of a four-story, redbrick fortress. He tried to grasp the meaning of the story as he told it: why the men chose to stop him, why they did it in broad daylight, why they were so calm and deliberate. “Why would they do that — to me?” he whispered breathlessly into the phone. “Dad, they don’t know me. And they weren’t acting drunk. It’s just 3:30 in the afternoon. They could see me, and I could see them!” My son rambled on, describing the car and the men, asking questions that I couldn’t completely answer. One very clear and cogent query was why, in Connecticut in 2014, grown men would target a student, who wasn’t bothering them, to harass in broad daylight. The men intended to be menacing. “They got so close — like they were trying to ask directions. ... They were definitely trying to scare me,” he said, as I interrupted.

“Are you okay? Are you —”

“Yeah,” he continued anxiously. “I’m okay. I guess. ... Do you think they saw which dorm I went back to? Maybe I shouldn’t have told my roommate. Should I stay in my dorm and not go to the library tonight?”

Despite his reluctance, I insisted that he report the incident to the school. His chief concern was not wanting the white students and administrators to think of him as being special, different, or “racial.” That was his word. “If the other kids around here find out that I was called a ******, and that I complained about it,” my son pleaded, “then they will call me ‘racial,’ and will be thinking about race every time they see me. I can’t have that.” For the next four weeks of the summer program, my son remained leery of cars that slowed in his proximity (he’s still leery today). He avoided sidewalks, choosing instead to walk on campus lawns. And he worried continually about being perceived as racially odd or different.




Herein lay the difference between my son’s black childhood and my own. Not only was I a.ssaulted by the n-word so much earlier in life — at age 7, while visiting relatives in Memphis — but I also had many other experiences that differentiated my life from the lives of my white childhood friends. There was no way that they would “forget” that I was different. The times, in fact, dictated that they should not forget; our situation would be unavoidably “racial.” When we moved into our home in an all-white neighborhood in suburban New York in December 1967, at the height of the black-power movement and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s civil-rights marches, integration did not — at all — mean a.ssimilation. So my small Afro, the three African dashiki-style shirts that I wore to school every other week, and the Southern-style deep-fried chicken and watermelon slices that my Southern-born mother placed lovingly in my school lunchbox all elicited surprise and questions from the white kids who regarded me suspiciously as they walked to school or sat with me in the cafeteria. After all, in the ’60s, it was an “event” — and generally not a trouble-free one — when a black family integrated a white neighborhood. Our welcome was nothing like the comically naïve portrayal carried off by Sidney Poitier and his white fiancée’s liberal family members in Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, which had opened the very month that we moved in.

It wasn’t about awkward pauses, lingering stares, and subtle attempts of “throwing shade” our way. It was often blatant and sometimes ugly. Brokers openly refused to show houses to my parents in any of the neighborhoods that we requested, and once we found a house in The New York Times Sunday classifieds, the seller demanded a price almost 25 percent higher than listed in the paper. A day after Mom and Dad signed the contract, a small band of neighbors circulated a petition that outlined their desire to preemptively buy the house from the seller to circumvent its sale to us. My parents were so uncertain of this new racial adventure that they held onto our prior house for another four years — renting it on a year-to-year lease — “just in case,” as my mother always warned, with trepidation on her tongue.

Referred to as “that black family that moved onto Soundview,” we never quite felt in step with our surroundings. A year after moving in, my 9-year-old brother was pulling me down our quiet street in his red-and-white Radio Flyer wagon when we were accosted by a siren-screaming police car; an officer stepped out shouting, “Now, where did you boys steal that wagon?” Pointing breathlessly to our house a few yards away, we tried to explain that it was my brother’s new wagon, but the officer ushered us into the back seat. Our anguished mother heard the siren and ran across three lawns to intervene. What I remember most is how it captured the powerlessness and racial isolation that defined our childhood in that neighborhood.

We never encountered drawn or discharged guns like those faced by unarmed black teenagers Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., or Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. But I was followed, stopped, and questioned in local stores and on local streets frequently enough that I wondered whether my parents would have been better able to protect us from these racial brushes had they been rich, famous, or powerful — or if they had been better acquainted with the white world in which they immersed us. Perhaps I was naïve to think that if they had been raised outside segregated Southern neighborhoods and schools, they would have been better able to help us navigate the life we were living. In the 1970s, I imagined that the privileged children of rich and famous blacks like Diana Ross, Bill Cosby, or Sidney Poitier were untouched by the insults and stops that we faced. Even though the idea wasn’t fully formed, I somehow a.ssumed that privilege would insulate a person from discrimination. This was years before I would learn of the research by Peggy McIntosh, the Wellesley College professor who coined the phrase “white male privilege” to describe the inherent advantages one group in our society has over others in terms of freedom from discriminatory stops, profiling, and arrests. As a teenager, I didn’t have such a sophisticated view, other than to wish I were privileged enough to escape the bias I encountered.

And that was the goal we had in mind as my wife and I raised our kids. We both had careers in white firms that represented the best in law, banking, and consulting; we attended schools and shared dorm rooms with white friends and had strong ties to our community (including my service, for the last 12 years, as chairman of the county Police Board). I was certain that my Princeton degree and economic privilege not only would empower me to navigate the mostly white neighborhoods and institutions that my kids inhabited, but would provide a cocoon to protect them from the bias I had encountered growing up. My wife and I used our knowledge of white upper-class life to envelop our sons and daughter in a social armor that we felt would repel discriminatory attacks. We outfitted them in uniforms that we hoped would help them escape profiling in stores and public areas: pastel-colored, non-hooded sweatshirts; cleanly pressed, belted, non-baggy khaki pants; tightly-laced white tennis sneakers; Top-Sider shoes; conservative blazers; rep ties; closely cropped hair; and no sunglasses. Never any sunglasses.

No overzealous police officer or store owner was going to profile our child as a neighborhood shoplifter. With our son’s flawless diction and deferential demeanor, no neighbor or playdate parent would ever worry that he was casing their home or yard. Seeing the unwillingness of taxis to stop for him in our East Side Manhattan neighborhood, and noting how some white women clutched their purses when he walked by or entered an elevator, we came up with even more rules for our three children:

1. Never run while in the view of a police officer or security person unless it is apparent that you are jogging for exercise, because a cynical observer might think you are fleeing a crime or about to a.ssault someone.

2. Carry a small tape recorder in the car, and when you are the driver or passenger (even in the back seat) and the vehicle has been stopped by the police, keep your hands high where they can be seen, and maintain a friendly and non-questioning demeanor.

3. Always zip your backpack firmly closed or leave it in the car or with the cashier so that you will not be suspected of shoplifting.

4. Never leave a shop without a receipt, no matter how small the purchase, so that you can’t be accused unfairly of theft.

5. If going separate ways after a get-together with friends and you are using taxis, ask your white friend to hail your cab first, so that you will not be left stranded without transportation.

6. When unsure about the proper attire for a play date or party, err on the side of being more formal in your clothing selection.

7. Do not go for pleasure walks in any residential neighborhood after sundown, and never carry any dark-colored or metallic object that could be mistaken as a weapon, even a non-illuminated flashlight.

8. If you must wear a T-shirt to an outdoor play event or on a public street, it should have the name of a respected and recognizable school emblazoned on its front.

9. When entering a small store of any type, immediately make friendly eye contact with the shopkeeper or cashier, smile, and say “good morning” or “good afternoon.”

These are just a few of the humbling rules that my wife and I have enforced to keep our children safer while living integrated lives. For years, our kids — who have heard stories of officers mistakenly arresting or shooting black teens who the officers “thought” were reaching for a weapon or running toward them in a menacing way — have registered their annoyance at having to follow them. (My 12-year-old daughter saw the importance of the rules when, in late August, she and I were stopped by a county police officer who apparently was curious about a black man driving an expensive car. He later apologized.)

Not many months ago, my children and I sat in the sprawling living room of two black bankers in Rye, N.Y., who had brought together three dozen affluent African-American parents and their children for a workshop on how to interact with law enforcement in their mostly white communities. Two police detectives and two criminal-court judges — all African-American — provided practical suggestions on how to minimize the likelihood of the adolescents being profiled or mistakenly Tasered or shot by inexperienced security guards or police officers. Some of the parents and most of the kids sat smugly, passing around platters of vegetables and smoked salmon — while it helped to have the lessons reinforced by police officers, we had all heard it many times before.

My kids and I had it all figured out.

Or so we thought...

The rest of the article is on the website.

Long story short: Wealthy, educated, black man raised his children to behave in a cultured manner hoping to keep them from bigotry, son is called a ******, talks about how his wealth, education, and culture didn't keep bigotry from reaching his children.
Should've read Neely Fuller's Code to White Supremacy and the Isis Papers by Frances Cress Welsing


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A Kentucky fire chief is being criticized for racist comments after he refused to help a family of stranded motorists because they were black, and then suggested that an Asian-American television reporter did not understand English.

In a Bullitt County Sheriff’s deputy’s body camera recording obtained by WDRB, Southeast Bullitt County Fire Chief Julius Hatfield can be heard discussing a car accident on I-65 in September.

Hatfield first goes out of his way to provide a.ssistance to Loren d!cken, who is white.

“You got a jack, ain’t you?” Hatfield asks the driver. “If you show me where them things is at, I’ll get my guys to start changing the tire for you.”

At first, d!cken turns down the offer, but Hatfield insists, saying, “It will save you a bill.”

Firef!ghters working for Hatfield even picked d!cken up from the hospital and took him back to the firehouse, where his car was ready and waiting.

But Hatfield treats the family of four black motorists completely differently.

“Well, I’ve got a family of four from Cincinnati, I got to do something with,” the Bullitt County deputy tells Hatfield over the radio.

“We ain’t taking no n*ggers here,” Hatfield replies, laughing.

Instead of offering to help driver Chege Mwangi, the deputy recommends that he call the AAA motor club.

Mwangi told WDRB that he noticed that the firef!ghters had provided a.ssistance to other motorists, but his family wasn’t injured so he didn’t think much of it. However, he said that the sheriff’s department was helpful.

And when WDRB’s Valerie Chinn attempted to ask Hatfield about the financial management of Southeast Bullitt Fire Department at a town meeting, he suggested that she didn’t understand English, and threatened to have her arrested.

“Do you understand English darling?” he says in video recorded at the public meeting by WDRB cameras. “Do you understand English?”

“Turn that camera off,” Hatfield barks. “I’ve asked you that in a nice way. Buddy, call the cops and get them here.”

“I asked you once tonight if you understand English,” the fire chief adds after Chinn presses the issue. “I’m speaking English.”

Hatfield later told Chinn over the phone that he did not recall the remarks he made while responding to the accident on I-65 in September, but he was sure that it was a slip of the tongue. Chinn said that he also apologized for the way that he treated her at the town meeting.
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