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 3 years ago '10        #661
WalmartRollback 3 heat pts
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 fabolous_iam said:
way more white people than blacks...
You win.
 3 years ago '04        #662
Jumpoff21 29 heat pts29
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The reason why is doesn't get mentioned much is that there's also more positive images of white people on TV being shown in the media.
 3 years ago '04        #663
Propel Water 20 heat pts20
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Who said white on white crime IS NOT a white problem?

Its just people being fu*ked up to other people regardless of color
 3 years ago '13        #664
Thetinman 24 heat pts24
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 skillzbnasty said:
The hypocrisy of white folks thinking only black on black crime is a problem..

its like waking up in the morning telling someone their breath stinks knowing damn well you aint brush your teeth yet
 08-16-2014, 11:08 PM         #665
Old Man Quillis  OP
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 fabolous_iam said:
way more white people than blacks...
Not in the prison system though.....
 3 years ago '13        #666
yourlifeisalie 
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 Old Man Quillis said:
Not in the prison system though.....
lol got em
 3 years ago '06        #667
davon4204 34 heat pts34
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Racism will never go away until God comes back and clean this earth up.
 3 years ago '06        #668
RAZAH CUTS 5839 heat pts5839
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On the afternoon of Aug. 9, a police officer fatally shot an unarmed, black teenager, Michael Brown, in Ferguson, Missouri. Details remain in dispute. Eyewitnesses have said that Brown was compliant with police and was shot while he had his hands up. Police maintain that the 18-year-old had a.ssaulted an officer and was reaching for the officer's gun. One thing clear, however, is that Brown's death follows a disturbingly common trend of black men being k!lled, often while unarmed and at the hands of police officers, security guards and vigilantes.

After news of Brown's death broke, media-watchers carefully followed the narratives that news outlets began crafting about the teenager and the incident that claimed his life. Wary of the controversy surrounding the media's depiction of Trayvon Martin -- the Florida teen k!lled in a high-profile case that led to the acquittal of neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman -- people on Twitter wondered, "If they gunned me down, which picture would they use?" Using the hashtag #IfTheyGunnedMeDown, users posted side-by-side photos, demonstrating the power that news outlets wield in portraying victims based on images they select.

On Monday, Twitter user LordSWVP tweeted out a photo driving home another point: Media treatment of black victims is often harsher than it is of whites suspected of crimes, including murder.


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This is by no means standard media protocol, but it happens frequently, deliberately or not. News reports often headline claims from police or other officials that appear unsympathetic or dismissive of black victims. Other times, the headlines seem to suggest that black victims are to blame for their own deaths, engaging in what critics sometimes allege is a form of character a.ssassination. When contrasted with media portrayal of white suspects and accused murderers, the differences are more striking. News outlets often choose to run headlines that exhibit an air of disbelief at an alleged white k!ller's supposed actions. Sometimes, they appear to go out of their way to boost the suspect's character, carrying quotes from relatives or acquaintances that often paint even alleged murderers in a positive light.

Here are a few examples:

WHITE SUSPECT

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BLACK VICTIM

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WHITE SUSPECT

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BLACK VICTIM

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WHITE SUSPECT

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BLACK VICTIM

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WHITE SUSPECT

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 08-19-2014, 03:45 PM         #669
Old Man Quillis  OP
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 Boston617 said:
Honestly older whites control the media, what do u expect? Obviously the dude who wrote this article was finding quotes to fit his story but ay nothing really new there. Just hope someone like @ doesnt come in and become a victim in this situation.
That smiley usage
 3 years ago '13        #670
fishpoop 1 heat pts
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I've seen plenty of stories on the news where a black kid is k!lled and is described as a bright young individual with a promising future ahead of him. And vice versa with the white kid murderers. This article is making something out of nothing.
 3 years ago '10        #671
SmoothTay 23 heat pts23
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sh*t crazy fam
 3 years ago '06        #672
RAZAH CUTS 5839 heat pts5839
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Uber, the popular ride share service, is rolling out a new feature in Washington, D.C. that allows the city’s residents to request quick deliveries of everything from Altoids to Zest Ocean Breeze Refreshing Bar Soap.

That is, some of the city’s residents. Twitter user @DonnyBridges was quick to note that Uber’s delivery areas — currently two sections of Northwest and Southeast DC — looked suspiciously familiar:


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The practice of “redlining” has been utilized for decades by industries ranging from supermarkets to banking. But if brick and mortar stores engage in a kind of quiet discrimination by simply choosing not to opt in to low-income or minority neighborhoods, companies like Uber, which are highly scalable and inherently mobile, make conscious decisions to purposefully opt out of entire neighborhoods from their service areas.

Technology companies in particular, born in the lily-white incubators of Silicon Valley and Alley, are increasingly coming under fire for their questionable relationships to minority communities. Most recently, the makers of smartphone app Sketch Factor, which advises users which neighborhoods are “sketchy,” faced harsh criticism for stoking racial profiling by flagging predominantly minority neighborhoods.
 3 years ago '12        #673
cubes 4 heat pts
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I dont blame em They aint tryna get their riders robbed
 3 years ago '06        #674
servesurite 42 heat pts42
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nw & sw safest areas.

smart of em, cuz u know these knuckle heads in southeast and northeast will rob em over some stupid sh*t
 3 years ago '10        #675
Alerts 221 heat pts221
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 servesurite said:
nw & sw safest areas.

smart of em, cuz u know these knuckle heads in southeast and northeast will rob em over some stupid sh*t
If you have an account pay with a CC why would you rob. GTFO of here with this bull.

And I don't think its race base, I'm sure they did some dumb a.ss skewed study
 3 years ago '06        #676
RAZAH CUTS 5839 heat pts5839
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“If you can find a single person in this community who trusts the police, that is like finding a four-leafed clover.”

“Everybody in this city has been a victim of DWB [driving while black].”

"The first question is 'Do you have any guns, do you have any drugs, anything of that nature?' I am like sir, I don't even have a record. I have never been in trouble."

"And then he looked at me and he said, 'Mom, how long will this happen to me?' And I said, 'For the rest of your life.'"

The quotes from Ferguson, Missouri, tell a story. The city’s residents, who are mostly black, generally distrust the local police forces, who are almost entirely white. Stop-and-search statistics reveal a history of racial profiling in the community.

While the focus for the last two weeks has been on the specific racial tensions boiling over in the St. Louis suburbs, Gallup rounded up several years of polling data showing that these stories about black distrust of the police in Ferguson match with broader perceptions among African Americans nationwide. Black Ferguson residents’ lack of faith is representative of broader national attitudes. Gallup finds there's a more-than-2o-point gap between the portion of blacks and whites who mostly trust the police.

Gallup’s Frank Newport notes that the police tested third-highest out 17 institutions in whites' confidence, behind only the military and small business. Blacks rated police seventh, behind organized religion, the medical system, and television news.

While the racial divide is smaller, blacks also gave police officers lower honesty and ethics rating than whites.

A racial division is also evident in views of the investigation of Brown's k!lling and the way police are handling the protests. A new national survey by the Pew Research Center finds 65 percent of blacks think the police response to the Ferguson protests has gone too far, compared to just 33 percent of whites.

Whites also have much more confidence than blacks in the investigations into the shooting. More than three-quarters of blacks have little or no confidence in the investigations. St. Louis county prosecutors plan to begin presenting evidence about Michael Brown's shooting to a grand jury on Wednesday. The U.S. Justice Department is undertaking a parallel investigation.

As journalists and politicians grapple with ways to restore confidence in Ferguson's local police, it's worth noting that these tensions between police and citizens aren't confined to a small community in Missouri.
 3 years ago '06        #677
RAZAH CUTS 5839 heat pts5839
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There can be no denying what the newspaper has reported for decades.


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(Editor's Note: The Political Eye is a column at the St. Louis American, the country's only African-American weekly newspaper published since 1928. This commentary appeared last Thursday, but speaks to the ongoing institutional racism and other barriers that have been exposed by Michael Brown's k!lling.)

The EYE is moving in unchartered waters writing about the police shooting of Michael Brown, the greater St. Louis African-American community’s unprecedented response in protest and the militarized police repression of these protests. The motto of this column is “what it is, it ain’t,” because in St. Louis politics, and in much of our civic life, the truth seldom comes out plain. Almost always, it’s twisted.

In this case, for once, what it is, it is.

An unarmed black teen is shot multiple times in broad daylight and k!lled by a uniformed police officer. Police officials release an implausible story, compared to civilian eyewitness reports, and mention pending toxicology tests, planting the suggestion that the dead man was stoned. Nothing new, tragically, in any of this.

But then the people erupted – that was new in St. Louis – and the police responded literally as the jack-booted thugs typically described by people who fear the police and suffer at their hands. We are talking riot gear, rubber bullets, tear gas, rifles pointed in the faces of civilians, slathering dogs. What it is, for once, it is.

Chaos and looting ensued. This let the conversation be shifted, by those uncomfortable with the dead black man and the cry for justice, toward looting, instead of the police shooting.

Police officials have continued to refuse to release the name of the police shooter (who was placed on paid suspension) or a police report. Yet the county prosecutor, Bob McCulloch, made public images of looters. Justice for places to buy things was regarded publicly as more important to the county’s lead prosecutor than justice for a dead black man. What it is, for once, it is.

In social media, white men (they were always, in hundreds of posts, white men) licked their chops – even while posting to a black media site – about having the vigilante privilege to shoot looters. These white men showed no concern about a black teen shot dead by police, but they were very angry that black people were getting away with stealing shoes and hair weaves. They publicly expressed a desire to shoot these black people. What it is, it is.

Conflicts in the black community that are always silently glossed over came out in the raw. A prominent pastor pulling up for the candlelight vigil on Sunday, before it went to hell, saw a Muslim activist radicalizing some public housing youth who also were headed for the vigil.

“What is he saying to those boys?” the pastor asked a bystander he knew.

“Just what you think he is,” the pastor was told.

“O, Lord,” said the pastor.

O, Lord. What it is, it is.

We all know that we have almost completely lost this generation of black youth, though we always disguise this with words like “at-risk” and “under-represented.” Not this time. This time most of the grown folks were in church praying, and most of the youth were on the streets protesting, hurling words at the police you definitely can’t say in church. What it is, it is.

The themes sounded weekly in this newspaper for decades, which are routinely ignored by the local mainstream media, were suddenly national and international news. Majority-black communities with white officials and white police forces. Stratospheric racial disparities in traffic stops and tickets. Disinvested ring suburbs. Income disparities. Black rage. Jack-booted thug cops. Our peers in the local media like to act as if we make this stuff up, week after week, but suddenly they were competing with the nation’s major metro dailies to tell our stories. What it is, it is.

The United States Department of Justice got involved with a greater St. Louis police shooting. Despite the incredibly cautious language used by President Barack Obama and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, the clear implication was that greater St. Louis police officials cannot be trusted to police themselves. What it is, it is.

In St. Louis, many people style themselves as “leaders” who never lead anyone anywhere, and they are allowed to get away with it. But this thing erupted as a largely leaderless protest, and when the protest was met with vicious repression, the typically self-styled “leaders” were nowhere to be found.

The lame duck County Executive Charlie A. Dooley made some public appearances and gave some strong interviews. Steve Stenger, the white councilman who defeated Dooley, the county’s first black county executive, in the recent Democratic primary, barely lifted a finger to tell The American to get his statement off Twitter. What it is, it is.

Surprisingly, Republican nominee for county executive, Rick Stream, made a much better showing. Stream showed more support for the community than Stenger and many other Democrats who come begging for black votes come election time, such as Attorney General Chris Koster, who wants to be governor. Term-limited Gov. Jay Nixon made a token appearance at a memorial event after being hounded publicly by state Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, who with St. Louis Alderman Antonio French were the leaders among elected officials on the ground. U.S. Senator Roy Blunt also stayed in close touch with The American after hell broke loose.

The longtime congressional representative for North County, U.S. Rep. Wm. Lacy Clay, did not come home to protect and strengthen his people in their desperate hour of need. He did write a letter to Holder co-signed by two of his congressional colleagues challenging Holder to expand the DoJ’s investigation into police malpractice. But he did not appear at a local protest or even a press conference. He was absent as a leader. What it is, it is.

St. Louis – we know – is a fragmented region, and not all of its municipalities are viewed as equals. Typically, however, this fact is buried in relatively empty claims of working (or even “better”) together. Not this time.

Ferguson Mayor J ames Knowles III tried to lay blame on the unrest in his city on residents of neighboring Dellwood. This is the white mayor of a municipality with roughly four times (roughly 21,000 to 5,000) the population of a municipality governed by a black mayor, Reggie Jones. That kind of “Goliath insults David” story is seldom made public. This time, it was. What it is, it is.

The heated words a black mayor of a tiny municipality might have with the white mayor of a much larger municipality who has insulted him are seldom released to the public. They were this time. Jones said he sent cops to quell Knowles’ city’s unrest and all he got in return was a public insult, and he wasn’t going to stand for it. What it is, it is.

Moving from local in-f!ghting to almost glamorous international digital intrigue, the hacker collective Anonymous got involved. Anonymous threatened the City of Ferguson with targeting its a.ssets if protestors were harmed. Then it went after County Police Chief Jon Belmar, posting his personal information and images online and threatening worse if he did not disclose the name of the police shooter. This was done on behalf of a community that fears how much information the police holds over their heads. This was information about the top cop being held over his head, for a change. What it is, it is.

The EYE returns, over and over, to an image from the very beginning of this crisis: the image of an unarmed black teenager with college aspirations, shot dead by a uniformed police officer, left to lie dead on the street in the sun for four hours. The EYE is convinced that if Michael Brown’s corpse had been treated immediately with the routine respect due to a dead human being, none of these horrible truths would have come to brutal light at this time. The people may well have not erupted at last.

But this time – the EYE maintains – the police showed the community how it really feels about a dead black man.

Let’s hear it from Jeanette Culpepper, founder of Families Advocating for Safe Streets, who annually hosts a peaceful homicide vigil on New Year’s Eve.

“That young man laid out in the street how long?” she called The American to vent and grieve. “Four hours? That’s ridiculous. You don’t let a dead dog lay that long. The dead are gone, but the family is still living, so you have to be sensitive. You have to treat people like you want to be treated. That’s a hurt to his mother, that’s a hurt to his family, that’s a hurt to his community. What does it take to get him up, get him on a stretcher? That’s wrong.”

This time, for once, what it is, it is.
 3 years ago '06        #678
RAZAH CUTS 5839 heat pts5839
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The news: Philadelphia may be the City of Brotherly Love — but as these pictures show, we could all use a little more of that in our lives.

Last Saturday, a group of artists decided to stage a silent protest in front of the LOVE statue, an iconic Philly landmark. The group seized on what was perhaps the most gruesome detail from Michael Brown's shooting death in Missouri: the fact that his body was left uncovered on the street in broad daylight for hours.

So Keith Wallace, an MFA acting student at the University of California and Philadelphia native, decided to pose as a dead body. Covered with blood, bullet holes and even police caution tape, Wallace lied down and stayed absolutely still for an hour — right in front of one of the busiest tourist attractions in the city.


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"It was something that's been brewing for a while in my mind," Wallace told Think Progress. "You realize, in these cases, there's a disproportionate amount of black men on the receiving end of this police brutality. And as a young black men, it strikes a different chord for me — it hits a little closer to home."

And what he experienced was shocking. While some people realized that the display was an act of protest and were moved by it, others were occupied by a more immediate concern: getting their photo-op.


[pic - click to view]



"There was an older white couple that wanted to take a picture in front of the LOVE statue," Lee Edward Colston, one of the protesters and a Juilliard theater student, told Philadelphia Magazine. "The older white gentleman said, 'Why do they have to shove their politics down our throats?' The woman replied, 'They're black kids, honey. They don't have anything better to do.'"

And even those who thought Wallace was a legitimate dead body didn't want to miss out on the picture.

"There was one group of white guys who wanted to take a picture in front of the statue, but one of the guys in the group couldn't take his eyes off of Keith's body,'" Colston added. "His friends were trying to convince him to get in the picture. He told his friends, 'Something about this doesn't feel right, guys. I don't think we should.' One of his friends replied, 'Dude, come on ... he's already dead.' Then they all laughed."


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The sight of a dead black man riddled with bullet holes was treated as a mere nuisance by these photo-hungry tourists, who had all apparently missed the irony of the statue behind them. "My body lay at their feet, and the statue was above all our heads. So you can still have your picture and choose to ignore the ugliness that was literally right at your feet," Wallace told ThinkProgress.

Even in the City of Brotherly Love, people had trouble mustering up enough love for a moving protest or even for a seemingly dead body — giving us a stark reminder of Brown's death. If we can't respect a corpse, how can we respect a living person?
 3 years ago '14        #679
Boston9084 
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fu*k all these quasi-military police.
Protests like Ferguson are a good way to put the divide on blast. Its literally us vs the cops now.
 3 years ago '07        #680
Avon_Barksdale 4344 heat pts4344
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[video - click to view]




Spike Lee has never been shy about sharing his opinion of how Black people are treated in America, and his latest comments prove this. While sitting with CNN host Anderson Cooper, the famed director suggests that there is a war on Black men across the nation.

Lee appeared on Cooper’s nightly program on Tuesday to discuss the police shooting death of 18-year-old Michael “Mike” Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Visibly agitated, Lee didn’t spare his words nor his emotions in speaking on the developments of the case as the public knows it.

“I do not think you should be k!lled in this country because allegedly you steal some cigarillos. I don’t think you should be k!lled if there is marijuana in your system,” Lee said to Cooper. “The people, not only in Ferguson, but all over this country did not trust what is happening. Something smells bad in Ferguson. And it’s not just tear gas.”
“I just think there’s a war on the Black male and it’s tearing the country apart in my opinion,” added Lee after Cooper inquired if the actions in Ferguson are part of a larger issue. Lee mentioned other slain Black men such as Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner and Ezell Ford to back his statement.
Watch Spike Lee’s comments to Anderson Cooper by following this link.

Do you agree with Spike Lee’s statement that there’s a war on Black men in America? Sound off in the comments section.


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