Ask a (pending) neuroscientist

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 5 years ago '13        #41
Dubble 
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Still answering questions or back to studying?
 03-22-2013, 08:09 AM         #42
THEYOUNGMESSIAH  OP
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after someone gets memory loss, is there anyway to regain it ? what are the main causes of it?
 04-22-2013, 03:51 PM         #43
AA1989  OP
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 THEYOUNGMESSIAH said:
after someone gets memory loss, is there anyway to regain it ? what are the main causes of it?
There are two general types of memory loss: retrograde and anterograde. Retrograde is the inability to form new memories (think 50 first dates, memento). Anterograde is the inability to recall old information prior to the traumatic event. The former is by far more common, but not common in general.
 04-22-2013, 03:53 PM         #44
AA1989  OP
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Here was my response to Lucifer:

There's a lot of research on sleep, and less on dreams. However, I'm not familiar with that sub-field. I know certain brain regions that are involved in dreaming but thats about it.

And thoughts are no more than a cacophony of electrical pules. Myself and many other neuroscientists have a very reductionist view regarding that question.
 04-22-2013, 03:55 PM         #45
AA1989  OP
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Lucifer then asked about the how vs. the why behind behavior to which I responded:

. On your point regarding why versus how, could you give me an example that discerns the two. Because from my point of view, the how is the neural mechanism behind the behavior and the why is the adaptability/fitness level. Therefore they are both physical phenomena, only differing in they way we attempt measure them.
 5 years ago '05        #46
Universal~Mind 59 heat pts59
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Random...
I'm someone who very rarely if ever gets a headache... In fact the only reason i've ever had one in my life in the rare occasions I have was for either being dead exhausted (sleep deprivation) or "On E" So hungry that I'm tempted to eat myself.... LOL

My question is, How come headaches seem to be more common than not, is not getting headaches like myself ever, a positive or negative thing? Why and why not, and what exactly is happening during this "repeated contraction and dilation of blood vessels"?

Thanks

P.S. interesting that your focus is memory, just got into memory processes in my psychology class
Best of luck on your educational journey sir.
 04-25-2013, 10:12 PM         #47
AA1989  OP
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Your question is for a medical student. A headache has nothing to do with the brain. Your brain doesn't "hurt" during a headache.
 04-27-2013, 01:42 PM         #48
Symon  OP
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......


Last edited by Symon; 02-16-2015 at 12:44 PM..
 04-28-2013, 06:07 PM         #49
AA1989  OP
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 Symon said:
I read a lot on the internet, but asking a real neuroscientist is something else:
  • Is it possible to raise the IQ, if yes, how and to what extent ?
  • If intelligence is trainable, which part of it is? Is it correct that fluid intelligence will always remain the same (more or less)?
  • The only neuro enhancers and "brain helpers" I knowingly consume are caffeine, loads of sugar and Phosphatidylcholine (in capsules). I'm a student so I need to be focused and concentrated most of the time. Are they safe? What long-term effects do they have? Are the other neuro enhancers you would recommend? Is there food that is specifically good for your brain/your memory? Ritalin and Adderall are not available here in Switzerland without prescription, I heard they boost your brain activity. What are some fully legal substances (don't matter whether in food or medicine) that have similar effects? Because finals are on their way..? Ginseng? Meds with Acetylcholine in them?
  • My daily actions and my habits shape my brain. What besides doing sports/jogging, reading and playing n-back games are specifically "brain-friendly" hobbies I should pursue?

I'm 21 years old, a foreigner (so pardon me for my terrible English. I never spent a minute of my life in an English speaking country), I study law and I'm a tutorial a.ssistant at my university (which means I have good grades, my professor approached me while I was at lunch and hired me on the spot because he had heard of me). I feel under pressure to maintain these grade or even achieve more. I need every type of advice.

Thanks in advance.
IQ scores remain pretty static after the age of six. So no, you can't really raise your IQ after early childhood.

The sugar and caffeine shouldn't be an issue if not over-consumed but once again I'm not a medical student.

And I don't know any brain friendly habits. Stop reading corny magazine articles, lol
 04-28-2013, 07:27 PM         #50
ThaLockerRoom  OP
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What causes addictions and what is the physiological processes for overcoming them
 05-01-2013, 04:36 PM         #51
AA1989  OP
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1. No.
2. Boost motivation? I don't know. That doesn't sound to scientific, does it?
3. There is no such thing as ESP.

I'm beginning to think you guys don't know what a neuroscientist is/does.
 05-01-2013, 05:08 PM         #52
AA1989  OP
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 ThaLockerRoom said:
What causes addictions and what is the physiological processes for overcoming them

You have to "extinguish" the learned preference for whatever drug it is. Most people use their drugs in the same places, so the environmental cues (in my case it'd be my room) become a.ssoicated with the drug and elicit cravings. Exposing yourself to the places without using the drug will slowly cause you to stop having craving within that place. The physiological mechanisms involve the re uptake of dopamine in the mesocorticolimbic system. I don't know the particular molecular mechanisms though.
 5 years ago '05        #53
gunot86 1 heat pts
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How do you feel about nootropics(ex.piracetam,aniracetam)? They sound alittle too good to be true
 5 years ago '07        #54
KnicksLost 17 heat pts17
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Im giving a speech in front of tons of ppl coming up and that aint really my thing.

How do I cope with this? Xanax? Alcohol? Beta Blockers?

Another thing I have issues with my memory
 06-13-2013, 04:58 PM         #55
AA1989  OP
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 KnicksLost said:
Im giving a speech in front of tons of ppl coming up and that aint really my thing.

How do I cope with this? Xanax? Alcohol? Beta Blockers?

Another thing I have issues with my memory
I have social anxiety and use klonopin myself.
 06-13-2013, 04:59 PM         #56
AA1989  OP
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 Dray said:
I dont agree with your opinions on marijuana.

That short term memory myth has been flawed and proved.
What did I say about marjiuana? And you're second sentence doesn't even make sense.
 5 years ago '09        #57
Polygod 75 heat pts75
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Dunno if your still doing this but I have a question OP:

In theory, would it be possible to simulate haptic touch through the nervous system using a non evasive device on the spinal cord that would utilize vibrations or non threatening electricity, like what they use to cure back pain?

Like if you where to send an electrical signal to the nerve that connects to your finger tip, and simulate hot, cold, rough, pointy, smooth etc?


Last edited by Polygod; 06-13-2013 at 11:27 PM..
 06-15-2013, 05:49 PM         #58
AA1989  OP
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 NefDizzle said:
Dunno if your still doing this but I have a question OP:

In theory, would it be possible to simulate haptic touch through the nervous system using a non evasive device on the spinal cord that would utilize vibrations or non threatening electricity, like what they use to cure back pain?

Like if you where to send an electrical signal to the nerve that connects to your finger tip, and simulate hot, cold, rough, pointy, smooth etc?
In theory, you're second question is plausible. The expierence of hot or cold has nothing to do with the stimulus but how your brain interepts the signal and generates an output in response.

In your first, question, are you asking if you could replicate the experience of identifying an object through touch by stimulating the spinal cord? I wouldn't think so but I don't know too much about somatosensation

edit: by the way you wouldn't stimulate the periphereal receptors (fingers) but you'd stimulate a pathway to the brain not from. Your fingers dont 'recognize' an object, your brain do


Last edited by AA1989; 06-15-2013 at 05:53 PM..
 5 years ago '09        #59
Polygod 75 heat pts75
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 AA1989 said:
In theory, you're second question is plausible. The expierence of hot or cold has nothing to do with the stimulus but how your brain interepts the signal and generates an output in response.

In your first, question, are you asking if you could replicate the experience of identifying an object through touch by stimulating the spinal cord? I wouldn't think so but I don't know too much about somatosensation

edit: by the way you wouldn't stimulate the periphereal receptors (fingers) but you'd stimulate a pathway to the brain not from. Your fingers dont 'recognize' an object, your brain do
I was just wondering if there was a way to simulate touch via the spinal cord with current technology I think with a form of illusion (like the ghost hand with amputees) and maybe electrical currents (because thats essentially all it is)you could trick the mind into feeling things that aren't really there. Like the burning coin trick with hypnotist
 5 years ago '04        #60
Skilllz 1 heat pts
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Can you tell me anything about Parkinson's? My grandma's just been diagnosed with early stages of Parkinsons.
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