Dallas-Born The D.O.C. Speaks Out Against Dr. Dre, Shares Insight Into Death Row'(THROWBACK 2011)

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 5 years ago '11        #1
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Dallas-Born The D.O.C. Speaks Out Against Dr. Dre, Shares Insight Into death Row'(THROWBACK 2011)
 

 
(LONG READ)

In regard to the thread started by "youngmic" about N.W.A. & The Posse- Where Are They Now-- I couldnt help but be moved to post the following articles. There is alot of rich history and insight into the a.ssemblage of one of the most important rap groups in music history.

Personally, The D.O.C. is my pre-eminent favorite rapper EVER (alongside AZ). He was the prototype for too many cats to name- no matter what coast. When the rap universe was (primarily) New York and L.A. , The D.O.C (along with Rakim) were light years beyond their peers.

Unfortunately, he lost his voice in a car accident and my world was never the same. One of the greatest to grab a microphone had been vocally silenced. However, that didnt stop him from chiseling out a strong impression in the "Mt. Rushmore" of Westcoast Hip-Hop from behind the scenes. Its hard to give you the feeling of how this man impacted the game if you didnt live it when he reigned supreme...This is the only way to provide you with a time-machine in order to get some sense of his importance....


RESPECT THE ARCHITECTS!



Dallas-Born The D.O.C. Speaks Out Against Dr. Dre, Shares Insight Into death Row's Launch


It's easy, sometimes, to forget who the greatest rapper Dallas ever spawned is -- especially when considering that, for the past 20 years, he's worked in a largely behind-the-scenes role, ghost-writing for other rappers and working closely as a mentor to genre luminaries Dr. Dre and Eminem.

But, nonetheless, The D.O.C., the man behind "It's Funky Enough" among other classics, holds -- and deserves -- that distinction, regardless of how content he's been to stay quiet in recent years.

Which makes this new two-part interview with the man born Tracy Lynn Curry posted to HipHopDx.com today all the more interesting a read.

In the piece, in which the rapper also reveals that he's working on a documentary about death Row Records' early years, the D.O.C. talks candidly about death Row (a name, he contends, he came up with, although he originally hoped to call it "Def Row" as a shout-out to Russell Simmons' East Coast label, Def Jam), as well as some background to his current relationship with Dre and his thoughts on Dre's way-too-long-in-the-making Detox.


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 Dallas-Born The D.O.C. Speaks Out Against Dr. Dre, Shares Insight Into death Row's Launch - Dallas - Music - DC9 At Night
As written by Pete Freedman from the DallasObserver.com



PART II

The man behind the rhymes of Dr. Dre and several other superstar artists reveals to DX the reasons for professionally separating from his "brother."

Hip Hop’s most accomplished ghostwriter, The D.O.C., has ended his working relationship with Dr. Dre.

Speaking exclusively to HipHopDX on Wednesday (January 26th), the mind behind rhymes for Eazy-E, Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, and several other artists within the Ruthless Records, death Row Records and Aftermath Entertainment camps over his 23 year tenure in the music industry explained to DX why he has ceased contributing to Dre’s long-delayed Detox.

The author of arguably the greatest debut album of any solo artist in Hip Hop history, (whose powerful voice was reduced to a raspy whisper after a car wreck fractured his voice box just two months after his platinum breakthrough, 1989’s No One Can Do It Better), elaborated in an at times vague, but clearly personally pained way as to how his historic “Formula” with Dr. Dre has been poisoned by greed and ego.


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[Writer’s note: The portion of Q&A presented below picks up at the point in D.O.C.’s discussion with DX after he reveals the stem cell surgery he is planning to have performed by an Italian doctor soon to restore his voice. That portion of Q&A will be presented in full in a forthcoming DX news feature]

The D.O.C.: I started talking to this [doctor] a couple of years ago. I was thinking about having this surgery to get my voice back. And maybe do a record, and continue with a [recording] career. But at that time, I was so settled in to helping [Dr.] Dre do his thing that it wasn’t really necessary for me to make records. Because, I can get the messages I wanted to get out through Dre. Detox was coming. In my mind Detox was supposed to be a departure from where we were. We were getting high, so now it’s time to detox. [And] now that we’re 40-plus…it’s time to start talking about some more sh-t [than what we used to talk about]. But we just have a difference of opinion where that’s concerned. So maybe I should get my voice back, I started to think again. Because I got a lot of sh-t to say, and it just don’t sound right coming from anybody else but me. Because of the differences in opinion [with Dre], I told you I reached out to [Jay-Z] last week. Jigga’s so far beyond what Rap is on a regular level. He’s an international kinda guy. And, I really need somebody powerful to be some wind at my back to pull everything off the way I want to.

It’s been a lot of negative sh-t that’s happened to me trying to give in this Rap sh-t. A lot of it at Ruthless [Records]; a lot of it at death Row [Records]… All my time [during] my 20 strong years in the game was [spent] helping build two classic fu-kin’ labels. Even though…by a long-shot I didn’t get what the fu-k I was supposed to have. n*ggas got wealthy and damn-near just turned their back on me, and it’s kinda hard to accept on a certain level.

I’m a G-O-D kid. Cash don’t rule everything, God rule everything around me. So when it’s time for me to stand up and speak, I know that that sh-t is gonna happen. I know that I got this voice for a fu-kin’ reason, otherwise I’d a been dead on that freeway ‘cause ain’t no fu-kin’ way you get to live through no sh-t like that unless there’s a reason.

DX: Let’s just clarify real quick before we go any further, are you saying that you’re not working with Dre at this point?

The D.O.C.: I’m saying that I did all I could do for Dre on this particular record. And I don’t even know if any of my work will be there, because he’s got his own ideas about the way he wants it to go. And you gotta respect that. Even though I played the second set of ears on every muthafu-kin’ thing else, now we at the stage where he don’t really trust what I’m saying. And I gotta respect him. I love him. So I gotta move back and let him do what he doing. And whatever that is, I’m going to respect it and ride wit’ it – whether or not it woulda been something I would of chose.

I believe that the point we are in the game as far as Hip Hop is concerned, we at a stage in the game where the music itself has become so powerful. Being in the information age, being able to get on Twitter and your site…record labels in 10 years will be obsolete. You won’t need them. So the power is being shuffled around. And those in the most powerful places, they not fin to just let they sh-t go… They’re going to grab a hold to the n*ggas with all the money, and they’re going to pull them n*ggas in a room and rub these n*ggas on their booties and make ‘em feel like it wouldn’t be sh-t without them.

I always tell muthafu-kas, anytime you get a classic record, no matter who sings on it, it took at least five muthafu-kas that are really good at what they do to make that record. And that’s real sh-t.

But back to the subject at hand, what I planned on doing was building an album – actually, two albums – and a reality show based around this stem cell operation [I’m going to have] over in Italy. I was gonna take these four or five artists that I got here in Texas, and this one female from New Orleans [with me] – all of which are the sh-t: two 23-year-olds, a 19-year-old white kid, and a little 9-year-old black kid from [my childhood neighborhood of] Oak Cliff, who was on [The Ellen DeGeneres Show] I think a year or so ago. And all these kids are really good. I know this music is about the young folks. It’s not about a 40-year-old n*gga that’s trying to make a fu-kin’ comeback. That’s not what I’m here for. My sh-t has always been much bigger than that. I’m always into helping the next muthafu-ka be great, instead of concentrating on myself being great ‘cause when I came into the game I was already so far ahead of a lot of these other muthafu-kas that it made me feel good to help them [and] bring them on up in it.

So when Eazy-E first started the fu-kery, it was shocking. Because, without me, Eazy don’t have a lot of that sh-t. [So] why would you fu-k me? Same thing with Dre. Dre, why would you fu-k me? Without me you wouldn’t have a lot of that sh-t. Why would you do that?!

DX: Can we just clarify once again? ‘Cause I wanna make it 100%, a 150% clear where your stance is with Dre as of this moment.

The D.O.C.: I love Dre like my brother. There’s nothing that you could do, or he could do really, to take away that feeling. Money isn’t what make – We been through too much; we did too much. I did too much wit’ him to be like, Aw, fu-k him. But, it’s not where it’s supposed to be. It’s not where it’s supposed to be after all of that. It’s not supposed to be like it is today between me and this guy. He’s surrounded himself with people that [agree with] what he’s trying to say today. And I don’t agree with that sh-t, so it’s really no need for me to be around it.

DX: Can you cite a moment [where this separation happened]? Was it the “Kush” record, [or] was there something before that where you just knew you had to part ways?

The D.O.C.: Nah. And I haven’t parted ways with this guy. I told you I love this guy like he’s my brother, but creatively it’s just not where it used to be. We don’t see things on the same level from a creative standpoint. I may not have agreed with “Kush” as it stood. I may have thought something else [would have worked instead], [but] I don’t have enough power anymore in that camp to really pull strings like I used to. Them n*ggas used to listen to every fu-kin’ word I said. Now it seem like they don’t do that no more.

It used to be all about the love of helping these guys come up. But, sh-t, they up. I always thought that once they got up, I’d be up – especially after I lost my voice. But that don’t seem like that’s what that is. I don’t need to have a hundred million…I don’t need all of that. It’s not necessary for me to feel like I’ve accomplished something. The art is important to me. It means a lot to me. I didn’t go through all of this sh-t for nothing.

What I wanted to do was do an album with this voice that I got right now, go over to Italy and have the operation with this doctor, do a subsequent album after I rehab the old voice back, film everything and put that sh-t on TV Some real reality. And every time that they poke me and prod me and stick me, and every time that sh-t hurt like a muthafu-ka, I’ma holla. [Laughs] On some real sh-t. And at the same time, Americans will get to see some of those beautiful-ass Italian birds walking around. Some good sh-t. That’s the kinda sh-t that frees your mind.

But [for the time being] I’m laying in wait. I’m back in Texas right now. I’m not in Cali anymore. I’m laying in wait to see what’s gonna happen on the Detox record.

DX: What do you mean waiting to see – just, which songs they decide to put out?

The D.O.C.: Yeah. I’m waiting to see which songs that he chose, ‘cause he already know which ones I like.

DX: Sir Jinx told me that the stuff he heard, that Dr. Dre played for him, was similar to the song in the Dr. Pepper commercial. Do you know if that’s the stuff that they’re looking at trying to put out?

The D.O.C.: The Dr. Pepper commercial, that’s one of the tracks, but that one was leaked already. That was the one with T.I. on it I think, [“sh-t Popped Off”]. And that’s not a bad one. I like that rhythm; I like the groove. I’m laying in wait, I wanna see. I’m a fan just like you.

I worked for four years on that record with that dude. It didn’t used to take us that fu-kin’ long. We’d go in, and it was a couple of years maybe [and] we’d have what we needed. But, the game has changed. All the pieces of the puzzle ain’t there no more, ‘cause the money has fu-ked up n*ggas’ minds. Everybody gotta be the big dog with the big d!ck. And that’s not how you create records. It’s gotta be love, and happy and fun and diggin’ it. The 2001 record was one that we had all got a chance to get together [for the first time] since the first Chronic record, and that sh-t was fun. It wasn’t really even about making music, it was just about, “Man, I can’t wait to get to the studio ‘cause all my little n*ggas gon’ be there. We gon’ smoke weed all day. We gon’ drink. Dre gon’ play some drums, and then whatever comes out comes out.”

But it’s a new day and time now. The kids is taking the Rap thing over. That’s why I really applaud Jay-Z, because he stayed so far above the clouds where the bullsh-t is concerned. He allows himself to be as great an entrepreneur as he ever was an artist. He allows himself to be a great human being first, an artist second, an entrepreneur and businessman third. And you gotta respect a man who’s strong enough mentally to be able to make all these power moves and do it on a low-key level where he don’t need that sh-t to blow himself up.


Last edited by ChickBoss414; 10-25-2012 at 09:58 PM..

60 comments for "Dallas-Born The D.O.C. Speaks Out Against Dr. Dre, Shares Insight Into Death Row'(THROWBACK 2011)"

 5 years ago '11        #2
ChickBoss414 27 heat pts27 OP
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DX: And you’re saying you think he can help you with these projects that you’re trying to get out: the albums and the TV show…?

The D.O.C.: Well, I’ll put it to you like this, if I can get Jigga – And I would’ve never reached out to him, because I’m not really good at that kind of thing. I’ve always just…I leaned on me understanding that once my boys got to a certain level it wouldn’t be about pushing them up anymore, it would be about pulling the rest of us to a level where we can all just kinda relax. But, that never really happened. It seemed like…it just went bad. But, getting back to your question, [back in 2003] Jigga put my name in a record, [“P.S.A.”], and everybody including my mother – who I don’t know how the hell she…a 60-something-year-old woman is trippin’ on a Jay-Z song [and] started calling me talking about, “Jigga put your name in a record.” And I thought that was really cool. And then [recently] I heard he put out a book, [Decoded], [and] there’s a picture of my old album cover in his book. Somebody said it talks about how influential the record was. So [that] gave me the nuts enough to reach out to this guy thinking that maybe…for the sake of nostalgia he’ll understand where I am and reach back. Because if Jigga says, Doc, I’ma fu*k wit’chu, then that means I have a full catalog of every artist and producer in the Rap game who will be willing at the drop of a hat to do whatever the fu*k I need. And if he’ll give me that, then I’m gonna build an album that’s gonna fu*k you up.

I got the young kids: the little girl from New Orleans is so fu*kin’ cold blooded. The young white kid from a city called Granbury, Texas - there was about seven black folks in his whole little country town. It goes down like that. But the guy was so addicted to Rap music that all the country lovers – it’s a country music town down there, all the high school kids, they line dance and sh*t. And they used to get on him real tough and [so] now he’s really serious. And he’s got the skill set to do it. There’s another kid named Dewaun J. And, I forgot this little nine-year-old guy’s name, but when I heard him rappin’, he’s doing what I would call b00ty-club music, what the Wacka Flocka [Flame]’s are doing these days. But he does that damn-near better than those guys and this kid is only nine-years-old. He sounds like a fu*kin’ grown man.

So, this is my crew. And what ties them all together is my knowledge of how to produce great music, great records, with content – not just “I gotta hit the club, and my wheels is shinin’, and my gold is blingin’, and I’ma get me some pus*y” and all this ol’ sh*t. Which is cool, don’t get me wrong, ‘cause we all like to bling, we all like to get ahead. God bless it, it’s such a wonderful thing. But, there’s also other sh*t going on in this world that muthafu*kas need to be aware of, whether you are 21 or 41. The world is changing, and black people in particular that are involved in Hip Hop music need to know how much power you got.

DX: Let me just interject again, ‘cause you keep saying this, and I know what you’re saying: Why doesn’t Dre, and even Em, why don’t they just go to Jimmy [Iovine] and basically put the gun to his head and say give us everything we want or else?

The D.O.C.: I’ll put it to you like this, when death Row started there was actually a corporation called Future Shock Records. This is what Dre wanted. I hated the name, [but] I had to ride wit’ it. During those days I owned that company. I owned 35%, so did Dre. [The founder of SOLAR Records] d!ck Griffey owned 15%, so did Suge [Knight]. That’s how it started. Now during those days, this was right after my accident – Now keep in mind, Future Shock was put together because I saw the fu*kin’ that [Eazy-E] was doing. If Eric is fu*kin’ me, then he gotta be fu*kin’ Dre. Dre is my brother, let me go put him up on it. Dre finds out that he’s getting fu*ked too. Now, me and Suge had already been talking at least a year or so before then about doing something else. But now I got Dre, Suge. How do we need to proceed? Suge was saying we all go to Griffey and start putting this sh*t in motion. But, The D.O.C. at that time, I’m still reeling from that accident. I lost my voice. I can’t do it. The pain is fu*kin’ me up. So now I done got all off into the wrong sh*t – way before Dre and them was on, “I’ma take an E tab.” The white girls had already put me up on that sh*t. I’m in Huntington Beach with the blonde chicks just losing it. And the further I fell down, everybody just stopped giving a fu*k [about me], I guess. So by the time the sh*t flipped from Future Shock to death Row, [I didn’t know what was going on]. It happened like in a day. I didn’t know what the fu*k happened. I went to Dre [like], “Man, what the fu*k?! What’s going on?” Dre says, “I think you might need to get a lawyer.” [I’m like], “Wait a minute, dude. You my brother. We doing this.” But by that time n*ggas had already started bringing around all [their] I-just-got-out-of-prison-ass n*ggas, and the whole scene started to change. And now that Dre don’t got my back no more I’m feeling like, Damn, I’m stuck in a hole [and] I don’t know what the fu*k to do. So I never got – To answer your question, I never got into the Jimmy [Iovine] world. I always disliked Jimmy, because I thought Jimmy knew that these n*ggas fu*ked me and nobody would stand up and say what about this guy?

Even during all of that fu*kery [during the early days of death Row], I still had to take [Snoop Dogg] under my arm and [be] like, “Snoop, we’re not just making street raps no more. We’re building songs now, and this is how you do it.” I’ll give you a for instance, [“Nuthin’ But A ‘G’ Thang”] was a street rap [originally written by Snoop], and I said, “Snoop, this is what we gon’ do, we’re gonna take this line right here that’s dope as fu*k, we’re gonna erase this part down here, [and] I want you to try this part again. We’re gonna move this part up to here ‘cause the flow sounds better. And I want you to write a whole ‘nother second verse [for Dre]: start the second verse with this line, then go down to here, and then [have Dre] end the whole rap with my name.” Now, that’s [technically] called producing. That’s actually called writing. But I never asked for credit for that; never got credit for that. Never got a dime for it. Because it’s all for the family. We’re doing this so that we can all blow up.

To get back to your question, I don’t know why those guys [won’t stand their ground with Jimmy Iovine] – well yes I do, they’re rich! They don’t give a fu*k. They’re rich, and Jimmy Iovine’s rich. Iovine wears Beats [By Dre headphones] everywhere he go. He’s not wearing them Beats ‘cause it’s Dre’s company. Jimmy’s no dummy.

My timing was just bad. I gave a fu*k about the music and not the business, thinking that my n*ggas had my back when they didn’t.

DX: Post 2001, [after] that album, what were you expecting to happen? Like, what did you want either Dr. Dre to do for you or just the situation to [create]?

The D.O.C.: You know what I wanted? I never stopped believing that my n*gga was gonna wake up one day and say, You know what? When I didn’t have sh*t this n*gga was doing. He wasn’t doing it for money, ‘cause I didn’t have sh*t to give him. When I had money, this guy was doing. He wasn’t crying about money.

I thought Dre was me. The situations could not be reversed and be like it is now. Now this is the crazy part, Dre and I are [still] brothers. And I know that n*gga love me like I love him. So when we argue, it’s the kinda sh*t earthquakes is made out of… So, we have to give each other space. But, it ain’t the same [this time]. It really ain’t the same, ‘cause dude got all the power.

But like I said, I really do love and respect him, and I know he feels the same way. That’s why I’m just anxious to see what [Detox] is gonna do. I’m anxious to see what you’re gonna do, where your mind is, where your head is, which way are you going, [and] how the fu*k are you gonna dig yourself out of this spot? Because now the whole world is watching. They’re waiting.

Stay tuned to HipHopDX for the remaining portion of our bombshell conversation with The D.O.C., in which he reveals additional details of the disintegration of his working relationship with Dr. Dre. The pen behind countless classics also takes a brief stroll down memory lane, recalling his history with Eazy-E, Jerry Heller, Ice Cube, Suge Knight, Snoop Dogg, and his more recent history with Eminem.



Last edited by ChickBoss414; 10-24-2012 at 11:55 PM..
 10-25-2012, 12:01 AM         #3
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cant help but wonder what might have been
 5 years ago '11        #4
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PART III

Exclusive: The pen behind almost an entire sub-genre speaks with unflinching candor about the end of his work with Dre, and several other shocking revelations about Suge Knight, N.W.A. and Rap history.

The best emcee to ever don an L.A. Kings cap, The D.O.C., spoke exclusively to HipHopDX late last month (courtesy of his new PR representation, Hoopla Media Group) and proceeded to give the most revealing interview of his over 20-year career.

In the first published portion of D.O.C.’s discussion with HipHopDX, the author of the awe-inspiring album No One Can Do It Better (and large portions of other certified classics, including Eazy-Duz-It, Straight Outta Compton, 100 Miles And Runnin’ and Efil4zaggin) revealed that his pen-for-hire work for Dr. Dre has finally ceased, after a total of over 18 years spent constructing quotable verses for Eazy-E, N.W.A., Snoop Dogg and several other notable names that have walked the halls over the years at Ruthless Records, death Row Records and Aftermath Entertainment.

Now in the remaining portion of The D.O.C.’s jaw-dropping Q&A, the ultimate insider to the history of the genre commonly referred to as Gangsta Rap breaks down his history with the likes of Suge Knight, Jerry Heller, Ice Cube, and maybe most notably, Eminem (who recently made a special request of the man whose aggressive flow on 1989’s “The D.O.C. & The Doctor” provided the prototype for Marshall Mathers’ truculent tone).

The man who was Snoop Dogg before Snoop Dogg, Game before Game, also elaborates on the dissolution of his longstanding professional relationship with Dr. Dre, providing previously unpublished details about how their “Formula” finally became toxic.

A little lengthy, but a must-read for anyone familiar with the role the simultaneous southern star and west coast forefather played in the careers of almost every artist to ever record to a Dr. Dre track, the following transcript documents one of the most influential emcees in Hip Hop history baring his soul in his “Against All Odds” moment.

Below is the truest sh*t The D.O.C. has ever spoke.


HipHopDX: I recently did an interview with Sir Jinx, and he revealed that you’re currently working on a documentary. So what exactly is the film about?

The D.O.C.: The whole Ruthless [Records break-up to death Row Records creation] story is really just patches. It’s bits and pieces of the truth. None of these people really know what happened because I haven’t said anything yet. Most of the guys that are in-the-know aren’t saying [what really happened] because it benefits them not to say it. The truth as it is in the world now, it makes them look good. Which is cool, I’m not really – that sh*t never really bothered me. Because, when I lost my voice I didn’t mind playing the background, not necessarily being the guy who got the publicity or the this or the that. But, after 20 years it’s become time to really let the cat out of the bag, because if I don’t, no one will.

They were talking about doing an N.W.A. movie for a minute, and I knew off top that that sh*t could never happen. Number one, none of those muthafu*kas really get along with each other good enough to do sh*t. And number two, everybody wants to tell a fraction of the story from their own perspective. And none of that sh*t coulda been true, because first off I wasn’t even in the movie. And you couldn’t have had N.W.A. like you had N.W.A. had I not left Dallas and came to California and helped those guys build songs. That’s just the facts. You wouldn’t of had it like that; you couldn’t of had it like that. [Dr.] Dre wouldn’t of had the career he had.

You actually would’ve never had death Row had I not been in California. Because, Suge [Knight] wasn’t my bodyguard but he…rolled with me. It wasn’t him and Dre that got together and said, "Hey, let’s do this." It was Dre and I that got together and said, "Hey, let’s do this." Unfortunately, it was right after that [car wreck I was in] and I was going through a really hard time, really trying to come to grips with what had been taken away. So, I was just being a fu*k-up. But, I wasn’t being such a fu*k-up that I couldn’t pull Dre over here and say, “Look, n*gga, this is what you need to do. This is what we need to do. Look at what [Eazy-E’s] doing to me. If he’s doing it to me, he could be doing it to you.” … So he and I got together with Suge and this other cat, [d!ck Griffey of SOLAR Records], and we all started making plans. Unfortunately, I started falling deeper into the wrong sh*t, down the wrong hole. And even though I was putting in a majority of the money and a gang of the work to make that sh*t happen, when it all came down to bare fruit I just wasn’t able to grab my apples off the tree. ‘Cause my mind was somewhere way somewhere else.

That plus the fact that Dr. Dre was always somebody that I trusted, that I thought that even if I can’t watch my own back, Dre’s gonna watch my back. And that’s not to say that Dre’s not a great guy…he’s just not me. Like, if the situations were reversed, I couldn’t be him and he’d be me. ‘Cause it’s not in my character. My nature is sort of that of a giving cat. So, there’s no way that he and I can be in the same situation reversed.

When it comes to making music, those guys [in N.W.A.] didn’t know how to build songs back then. For lack of a better [description], they was just kinda street guys. And even though it was street music, music is like writing a book, it has to have a beginning, a middle and an end.

The documentary is a journey over these past 20 years. I’m going to let you guys see all the drama, all the bullsh*t, from the inside. I’ma give you an interesting story, that nobody knows about. When I first got to California, back in fu*kin’ ’88, maybe ’87, I was sitting in the studio and playing at this little piano that was in this studio called Audio Achievements – where we did all the early N.W.A., Eazy-E sh*t. I was playing at this little piano and Eazy asked me if I wanted to go to this meeting. And to make a long story short, Eazy was [implying] that he was into this devil worshipping sh*t. … Now, I’m a young kid from Texas. I don’t know sh*t about gang banging, ‘cause the sh*t hadn’t happened in Dallas at that time. I don’t know sh*t about the streets really. And I damn sure don’t know sh*t about no muthafu*kin’ devil worshipping. So, you can just imagine, I sat there at that piano kinda frozen. I acted like I didn’t even hear the sh*t that he was saying. He was talking about he wanted me to go to some meeting, and man, I played like I didn’t hear nothing that muthafu*ka said and kept doing what the fu*k I was doing. … But, just that in itself can show you the kind of mind fu*kery that was going on throughout those years, when I was just there trying to be creative. I found out later that it was just game [from Eazy-E]. It was game gone too far. Because I was so far ahead of these n*ggas, that the only way that they could keep me under thumb was to run super game on me. So now I don’t know, do I need to ask somebody about my money or is the devil gon’ come get me? I don’t know. I’m 18, I don’t know what the fu*k to do. I just know I wanted to be the best muthafu*kin’ rapper, and I seemed to be heading in that direction.

Here’s the plan [going forward for] what I wanna do: there’s a doctor in Florence, Italy. His name is Paolo Macchiarini – world-renowned transplant specialist. This is D.N.A. medicine we’re talking about. In other words, he uses stem cells. He’s already done two operations similar to the one that would be necessary to do to get me my voice back. One on a woman’s windpipe, and one in the area of the voice box called the larynx. There’s actually a woman in northern California I believe who just had that surgery, but it wasn’t D.N.A. because that’s not available [in the United States]. … I know it worked for her [though], because she had cancer [that] totally destroyed her voice box and they transplanted her a new one and now she can talk. What’s going on with Macchiarini in Italy [is D.N.A. medicine] and what they did for [a woman] was, they took master stem cells from her body, from three different points in her body, in a laboratory and they re-grew the windpipe from her stem cells. … It’s some real Star Trek sh*t. It’s so far beyond what they do in the United States that it’s really hard to believe that they could do sh*t like that.


Last edited by ChickBoss414; 10-25-2012 at 12:24 AM..
 5 years ago '11        #5
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[Writer’s Note: The portion of Q&A presented below picks up at the point in D.O.C.’s discussion with DX following the portion of Q&A presented in his previous news feature.]

The D.O.C.: But if [Dr. Dre] don’t [drop Detox] this year, then you gon’ have to quit lying. Cut that sh*t out.

DX: Yeah, it’s turned into what Axl Rose did with Chinese Democracy. You wait too long and then…

The D.O.C.: Then it’s fu*ked up. So now, the only thing that’s left is the story. And the only reason that y’all ain’t got the story yet is ‘cause I haven’t told it. Those guys can’t tell the story because they didn’t write it. I did.

Eazy-E didn’t even have a name really until right before I got to California. When “Boyz-N-The Hood” was made, the guy didn’t really even have a name. When I first got to California, [after Dr. Dre] called me in Texas and told me to come to California – [Dre said], “n*gga, we could be rich, if you just lived out here.” Well, sh*t, a broke-ass n*gga from West Dallas, Texas, that’s all you had to say, I’ll be there in a minute. Borrowed whatever I could, and got my a.ss [out] there - slept on muthafu*ka’s couches. At first, [Dre] was planning on being my deejay. Because, Hip Hop was still so New York back then. It hadn’t made it to the west yet. But after we did Eazy’s [album, Eazy-Duz-It], Dre was like, “Eh, I don’t know about that deejay sh*t.” They hadn’t even done the N.W.A. album yet. But Eazy-E’s [single, “Boyz-N-The Hood”] took off so fast, he saw the future of the N.W.A. movement. And I can’t blame him. “n*gga, go get ya money.” ‘Cause I’m thinking, when I put this record out I’ma show y’all muthafu*kas how to really rap around this bi*ch.

I was really arrogant back then. I used to tell them muthafu*kas all the time, “If it wasn’t for me, y’all n*ggas wouldn’t have sh*t!” Which may be why n*ggas is trying to sh*t on me now, because payback is a muthafu*ka.

Once they got through with [recording Straight Outta Compton], it was pretty easy to see that that sh*t was outer space. But Eazy was fu*kin’ n*ggas early in the game. [Ice] Cube saw that sh*t very early, and boned the fu*k out. … If I wasn’t up there [at Ruthless] what the fu*k would they have done? You wouldn’t have a muthafu*kin’ n*ggaz4Life record, who was gonna write it? And Eazy still fu*ked me on that record! But I’m a 19-year-old, 20-year-old kid, I don’t know no fu*kin’ better. I’m up there with Dre. And Dre knew better. And he coulda did better. “Say man, is Eazy fu*king you or something? You got to do something, dog. Don’t just let me be out in the wind like that. I’m giving you life, n*gga.” Maybe it was a Texas [vs.] L.A. [divide], and them n*ggas really didn’t give a fu*k about nothing except the skills that I had at that time.

But I refused to believe [those rumors about Dre’s s3xual orientation], ‘cause me and Dre, we spent every day together. All his dirty laundry, I know all of that sh*t. Everything! [Laughs] And you ain’t heard me talking sh*t about the dude, ‘cause I don’t want him to look bad to nobody. I got love for him. I don’t ever want him – Matter fact, I used to get mad at him ‘cause I always wanted more for him than he did.

The actual name “death Row” came from me. I actually wanted to call the label “Def Row,” ‘cause in my mind Dre was what Russell Simmons was to the east …. That’s how important he was. And then one of the other artists, a female named Jewell, she was like, “Wow, that’s cool, death Row.” I was like, “Nah, Def Row.” And Dre was like, “Nah, n*gga, death Row ….” And then with all these thug-minded-ass muthafu*kas around…it didn’t take long before that’s just what that was.

It was a dirty time. And if you really had a movie about that sh*t, it would fu*k you up – from the beginning of Ruthless all the way through to the end of death Row, and it showed the kind of n*ggas that could manipulate [Tupac's] death. I know.

DX: You know…what happened?

The D.O.C.: I know if he is. I know if Suge is the kind of n*gga that could manipulate that. I know. I know everything.

[Even through everything], I still have no contempt for Eazy. Or Dre. Or Suge. Or none of these n*ggas. ‘Cause, it’s really none of their faults that I went through the sh*t I had to go through. It’s a G-O-D thang, it’s not a D.O.C. thang.

DX: So how much do you plan to present in this documentary? … How much of this do you really wanna rehash 20-plus years later?

The D.O.C.: Well, for me, it’s not really about the negative aspects of the story. What happened to me, you know, boo hoo, that was for Doc [to go through]. I just think the story is really neat. I think it makes a really cool story. [But] if you’re gonna tell it, tell that bi*ch right. I’m not afraid to shine a light on my fu*k-ups. So by that same token, I shouldn’t be afraid to shine a light on your fu*k-ups either – especially if it’s a part of the same story. If you fu*ked up, goddamn’t then you should have to deal with it the same way I did. And if nothin’ else, prove to another generation of young muthafu*kas how to do it better than we did it.

I don’t think ‘Pac or [the Notorious B.I.G.] ended up the way that they shoulda ended up. I don’t think it shoulda went like that. [All] because greed, money and power went too far with n*ggas that don’t really have any money. Having a million dollars ain’t no fu*kin’ money. These is muthafu*kas [in power] running around here with multiple billions of dollars, that can buy and sell you…at a heartbeat, as if you were a slave. They can do that.

Muthafu*kas was trying to get me to look at this video where Puff Daddy in drag – they supposed to be f*ggots. And everybody worship the devil, and all this ol’ sh*t. Now I was around Dr. Dre for fu*kin’ 20 years, if that muthafu*ka is suckin’ d!ck, then something ain’t right. ‘Cause I ain’t seen no parts or pieces of none of that sh*t. And I was there the whole time. Ain’t no way you can be gay and get that sh*t past me. So, when they started selling that [story] so heavy, then I know that it’s just media gone crazy, sensationalizing bullsh*t.

So if anything, I want to tell the sh*t and make it pure, make it a beautiful story: the operation overseas…and getting that voice back. [I want to make the movie] if not just to travel the country, going to different colleges and talking to these kids about what’s really good, about what’s really positive and really beautiful about this music and this culture. To me, [that] is a hell of a happy ending.



DX: You know what you gotta do in this documentary; you have to put a high quality version of the “I Hate To Go To Work” video in there. [Laughs]

The D.O.C.: [Laughs] That’s funny. That is funny. That was my Fresh Prince days. If [Will Smith] ever reads this, it’ll fu*k him up: I can remember when I was in that group, the Fila Fresh Crew, and I was opening up [a show for DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince]. And he had these dancers. It was two guys, and this one bow-legged girl. And they were wearing…spandex. This is when those things were in style. And Fresh Prince was on stage. He was rippin’. I had just opened it up. And the crowd was goin’ nuts. But they didn’t go nuts when I was up there. And in my opinion, I was better than everybody. So I was off feeling bad. And the little bow-legged girl was like, “Baby, don’t worry, you gon’ get your chance.” I thought that sh*t was so sweet that I never forgot that.

DX: We been talking here for about an hour. I got like a gang of questions: old school stuff …. How much further do you wanna go though?

The D.O.C.: Dog, you can ask whatever you want while you got me.

DX: In the video for “It’s Funky Enough” there’s a baby-faced Ice Cube not looking exactly thrilled to be there. [Laughs] Was Cube a little salty that The D.O.C. was getting his solo shot before he could?

The D.O.C.: Nah. Hell nah. We was all together then. Now, this is some foul sh*t, but in the early N.W.A., way before I got my chance, whenever these guys did interviews, whenever they took pictures, whenever they did videos, they went out of they way not to let me in ‘em. If you go back you’ll never see me in none of ‘em. They wouldn’t let me in ‘em. They didn’t want me there, I think because they didn’t want muthafu*kas to know that they wasn’t writing they own sh*t. If you go back to they old interviews, [when] the interviewers would ask them muthafu*kas questions they would look fu*kin’ dumbfounded. Because, the questions that they were asking the muthafu*kas was about lyrics that I wrote for ‘em. Only Cube really understood I think what the aim was. Dre did sonically. But Cube understood what we was trying to aim for. That’s why his subsequent albums were in that same vein.



DX: Let me take it back to “It’s Funky Enough” …. Is this story true that you were just fu*kin’ around when you spit that now classic Jamaican patois delivery, and that was just one take?

The D.O.C.: That was one take. They used to call me “One Take Willie.” We started that. Kurupt is the only other muthafu*ka to do that. … I had begged Dre to make that beat [using Foster Sylvers “Misdemeanor”]. It took me about three fu*kin’ months of begging him to make that beat before he finally made it. And those lyrics were actually meant for another song, but I didn’t have no words for that beat yet. So when I went in, I was just gonna lay something so he could finish adding the instrumental sh*t into the track. And when the beat came on, it just sounded Jamaican. So that’s the character that came out. And I just spit that sh*t. Muthafu*kas kept motioning me to keep going, so I did. At the end of that I was like, “Well I can do it better.” Dre was like, “fu*k that! I’m not changing none of that sh*t.”

DX: I gotta ask though, do you think “The D.O.C. & The Doctor” was your best vocal performance on the album? I think it’s still crazy to hear you go toe-to-toe with that electric guitar from Funkadelic’s “Good Old Music.”

The D.O.C.: I think that was my best Run [from Run-DMC] impression. Run was my hero. And the “diggy, diggy” thing came from him. So, it’s apropos that his son is named Diggy [Simmons]. And, I listened to young Diggy’s record and he’s got me all in it: from my raps to my cuts. So it’s all in the family. “D.O.C. & The Doctor” was my best attempt to try to be Run. As an artist all I wanted to be was Run. When they did the movie Krush Groove and he got mad at his brother, and went on stage and he said “It’s my muthafu*kin’ house,” that was me. I was that n*gga. … Well yeah, I do believe that “The D.O.C. & The Doctor” was my strongest vocal performance, you right. I put everything into that record.



DX: It’s just your range, man, your range was - It’s like, Rakim had his lane, [Big Daddy] Kane could do a little bit more, but damn’t The D.O.C. could do anything.

The D.O.C.: Now how fu*kin’ freaky would it be if I can go over here to Europe and come back with that power? C’mon man, that’s some Hip Hop sh*t that nobody else but me could do. You’d have to walk in these shoes to pull off some sh*t like that. And just one record with that old voice would make all of the sh*t that I had to go through, it would make that sh*t worthwhile.

DX: I don’t wanna rehash the more treacherous parts of the history, but [Ice Cube’s] “No Vaseline,” was that Cube just taking advantage of the situation, that there wasn’t a 100% D.O.C. to snipe back at him and give him some “Ether” to his “Takeover”?

The D.O.C.: Nah, man, because that wasn’t – he didn’t say anything about me. He wasn’t talking about me; he was talking about [N.W.A.]. And it wasn’t my place to say nothing. If I was smart, I’da followed his lead. [I] saw that it was fu*kery going on [at Ruthless], but I was being led by Dre. I was there with Dre. I didn’t know Eazy like that. I didn’t know the business. All I know is I wanted to be around Dre’s production, because I knew it was better than everybody else’s.

DX: So was it before or after the accident that you realized “the super-dope manager” [Jerry Heller] wasn’t so super-dope? [Laughs]

The D.O.C.: It was after that. I had to go into the hospital for a month or so. And, when I got charged back for all of that time – [Ruthless] had charged me double …. It’s called cross-collateralization. The monies they used to pay me with, they had already made [publishing] deals and gotten that money. My publishing was never my publishing, because it was always their publishing. So the monies that they were paying me…was money that they had already gotten from something else. It’s like if I take a dollar, and I give you a dime of that dollar. Somebody gives me a dollar and says it’s for an article you wrote, and I give you a dime of that dollar, and I tell you it’s for that article you wrote. But I’m gonna take back a nickel of that dime for all the time that was spent writing that rap. That’s what they were doing.

DX: That’s not what Jerry Heller wrote in his book, [Ruthless: A Memoir]. I was just on Google Books – you can skim through his book to see all the mentions of D.O.C. – and boy oh boy, he was apparently Santa Claus to you. He bought you your first house, and he got you your first doctor, that woulda rehabbed your voice but you didn’t wanna go to the rehab. He was just so generous, man. He did a lot for you – in his book. [Laughs]

The D.O.C.: Well I tell you what, nobody asks Jerry [Heller] where he got the money from to do all that wonderful sh*t he did. Where did he get all that money from? It had to come from somewhere. And to this day, I don’t own the publishing to any of those records. Not even from my own record. That’s sad but true. So if there’s anything I can do for today’s kids – especially the next muthafu*ka that’s as talented as I was – don’t live my life, n*gga. It’s fu*ked up. Be better than me.
 5 years ago '11        #6
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Watch this story, see how cold this muthafu*ka was. He was a little arrogant, may have been a bit of an as*hole. … I like to tell people I was Tupac before Tupac was Tupac. ‘Cause before Tupac was running up in clubs and spittin’ on muthafu*kas and slappin’ bi*ches on the a.ss, I was stuck in the girls bathroom all night at clubs. And wouldn’t nobody come fu*kin’ pull me out. [Laughs] ‘Cause Suge was standing outside the door. And I wanted to be where the hoes was, fu*k the club. I know sooner or later they gotta come in here. So I would go post up. And some of ‘em liked it, some of ‘em didn’t, but nobody fu*ked with me. Suge would stand outside that door all night. Oh I was something terrible.

DX: How did you actually meet Suge?

The D.O.C.: There’s a [keyboardist] named L.A. Dre [who worked at Ruthless]. I stayed with L.A. Dre’s brother in Compton for the first month [after] I moved to California…right behind the high school called Centennial, [where the Piru Bloods formed in 1972]. It’s an all Blood neighborhood out there. And I got my first gang bang story. It’s kinda funny. I’m not gonna share it with y’all; I’ma make y’all wait for the book ‘cause it was some crazy sh*t. But my first gang bangin’ experience was there. And Suge was L.A. Dre’s brother. Not his real brother, but that’s how they talked about [each other]. Like me and [Dr.] Dre; like Dre is my brother. Well, that was his brother, so I started hangin’ around with this dude. And because I was so much better than everybody else [at Ruthless], I was 19 years-old and these guys would take me into the clubs, and they would get me pus*y, I mean, it was just crazy. They was blowin’ my mind, so I thought I was really fu*kin’ God’s gift around this bi*ch. It was a lot to take, and I really started actin’ up.

But it was Eazy that would act up when Suge was with me, because nobody wanted to fu*k with that dude. And if they did wanna fu*k with him, then it would be on. I think Suge and I got kicked out of every [club] – no, not kicked out, we got banned from every fu*kin’ club in Hollywood. We’d go in, I’d see some female, and then I’d go right up and slap her on her a.ss. And if she turned around and said something slick, I’d put her on her a.ss. Or, if she had a guy and she said something slick, I’d put him on his a.ss. And then me and Suge would be in the club f!ghting four or five n*ggas. And [so] after awhile [club bouncers] would see us coming and they’d be like, “Nooo. Hell nah! Y’all muthafu*kas ain’t coming in here tonight!” It was fu*kin’ wild then.

DX: But did you believe that this roughneck guy was gonna be able to really run a business? Did you see him in that way, or is that just how he saw himself?

The D.O.C.: Well, when the Future Shock thing first kicked off – Like I said, it was 35% to me, 35% to [Dr.] Dre, [15% to Suge and] 15% to a cat named d!ck Griffey – who had ran a company called SOLAR, [Sound of Los Angeles Records], for quite some time. And had hit records with a lot of groups…before Rap got big in L.A. So, we were gonna use his knowledge. The guy passed away maybe six months ago. He died of a heart attack. And we were gonna use his knowledge. But, I came to find out later on that d!ck Griffey was just Suge of his day. I mean, so those guys already had they plan set up [to X me out of the label’s formation].

Dre and I went and got a million dollar publishing deal, and we used that money to make The Chronic. I ended up owing a sh*tload of taxes for that money, even though I never got no money from death Row. I mean, nothing.

DX: So how were you…surviving?

The D.O.C.: Dog, all I’ve ever done in my whole life was survive. I came from not having sh*t, so not having sh*t never really [scared me]. I stayed with [Dr.] Dre from the time [after I stopped staying with L.A. Dre’s brother up until I left death Row in 1994]. I always knew that I could never be totally left out – as long as Dre had a fu*kin’ mansion with five or six rooms in it, I had a room. I was gonna be able to eat good. I was gonna always be able to have what I wanted, what I needed, ‘cause it was always gonna be around. And like I said, by that time the drugs was coming around so business was the furthest thing from my mind.

All I wanted to do was be drunk, and be high. And talk sh*t to everybody, which I did, all the time. [Laughs] I would show up to meetings totally fu*kin’ inebriated, and blow the meetings up, with Dre and Suge and - So at some point I don’t blame those dudes for being like, "Wow, this dude is losing it." He’s not gonna be able to take care of [his issues].

DX: Is that when you left death Row after Doggystyle? I mean, did they want you to leave, or did you leave voluntarily?

The D.O.C.: I wrote a song. Dre started working on an album. He wanted to work on an album with [Ice] Cube, and it was supposed to be called Helter Skelter. And he gave me all of these books to read – apocalyptic books. He wanted me to get started for him. So I did. And I wrote this one song which I really liked…and when I played it for him, he immediately wanted to take it. And, those kind of things just hurt. I [got] tired of putting all of the work in but not being able to benefit, not being able to even get the love from it from the fans. These guys never told muthafu*kas how hard I was working. You never knew that I put so much work into [“Nuthin’ But A ‘G’ Thang”]. You just saw me in the video and a.ssumed I guess, Well, Doc, he must’ve been doing something. But I was sweating on that muthafu*ka just as much as Snoop [Dogg] and Dre.

DX: Would you ever reveal which verses for Snoop you penned on The Chronic and Doggystyle, or is that gonna stay private?

The D.O.C.: You know, number one, you can’t – well nah, let me take that lie back ‘cause I did write some of the sh*t, but very little. What I did was, like I told you before, Snoop would write a rap – this is in the early days; this is when he moved in [and was] staying with me in my house. The house that Jerry Heller was so nice enough to buy. And [so Snoop], he’d write a rap and he’d come upstairs, and I’d say that, “This part is good. This part ain’t good. Take these lines out. Try to replace them with this stuff over here.” That’s the way I helped Snoop. I helped him find out how to write a song. But by the time he got to Doggystyle, he was on cruise control. If you look at the video for the song “Deep Cover,” you’ll understand what I mean by Snoop had to be seasoned and groomed into the [star] that y’all see today. ‘Cause when you look at the “Deep Cover” video, you see a kid who’s – and even the “G Thang” video – you see a kid that’s unsure. He doesn’t have the confidence to even look in the camera and give it to you yet. Because he’s not quite sure yet, even though all I [did] is pump into him everyday, “If I can’t be the sh*t, n*gga, you’re gonna be the sh*t. If I can’t be that one, you’re gonna be that one.”

And that’s why Doggy Dogg love me, and his wife loves me to this day. ‘Cause I put a lot of love into that guy. And if I called Snoop, chances are Snoop would pick up the phone and give me what I ask for. But pride is a muthafu*ka. And I’ve always waited for Dre to be my n*gga. Because it makes the story so much better - everybody expects [us to work together forever] …. And the more muthafu*kas that really know [the story] they like, “Wow, that makes me lose love for Dre.” And I don’t want that. That’s what I don’t want.

DX: What actually led to you going back to Dallas [recently]?

The D.O.C.: The same thing that made me leave death Row in the first place. When Doggystyle came out and they wanted to move to, “Now we’re gonna start working on the album with Ice Cube,” and I’m thinking, I’m putting [in] all this energy, this effort, but I can’t see how I’m going to win. How is this going to feed a future family of mine? And Dre wasn’t giving me ideas…[like], Maybe you should do this. Or, at 500 million bucks, n*gga, you could give me a job bringing the weed to the studio everyday and pay me a $100,000 a year and write that sh*t off.

DX: I thought he was doing that this whole time?

The D.O.C.: Bro’, when I tell you I ain’t seen nothing - from this person that I’ve been patiently waiting [on] - I’m not lying to you. … I love being a part of great sh*t. And whenever I was fu*kin’ with Dre, that’s what we were making. Now, when we fu*ked around with 2001, he actually called me [in 1998] and asked me to come back: “I need you to come help me with this record.” And my love for Dre is strong, [so] n*gga that’s all it took. I’m on the next bird, let’s go.

But, now we at a stage in the game where…it’s just ugly. If it ain’t right, the sh*t is wrong. We can’t continue to go down that path if it’s not going to be beneficial to both of us. And I don’t want to be a detriment to your program, because you got a lot of young soldiers that are dope as fu*k. There’s a young n*gga over there named Slim da Mobster, who is every bit of a cold-ass emcee. One of the better ones on the west coast if you ask me. And, I can’t give to him the way I gave to Snoop, because I’m not in a place where I feel I can give. In my mind I’m at a place where I feel like I should be getting. Now it’s time to get.

DX: Did you sit down with Dre and say, Look -

The D.O.C.: Never did that. That’s one thing I never did.

DX: Why not?

The D.O.C.: Because I thought that, "n*gga, you my brother. You supposed to see my pain. I’m around you every day." I gotta be perfectly honest wit’chu, me and the good doctor, we sat down one night at dinner and we were talking, and our conversations were so far apart at that particular time that it was easy to see that we had to take some time apart. We weren’t seeing things eye-to-eye. The love was there, but not in a way it was supposed to be from my perspective. Maybe it was from his [perspective]. But like you said, I never sat down and said…I never told him what I’m telling you today. I just expected him to know it. And maybe I was wrong for that.

But, like I said, that’s my n*gga and I love him to death. And I felt like if I called him and said blah, blah, blah he’d be there, but pride is a muthafu*ka.

DX: So are you expecting anything to change? I mean, if he reads this…

The D.O.C.: You know what? I’m really over here just interested at this point in Dre finishing what he gotta finish. His legacy is a lot more important than our argument. And it would be very selfish of me to not ride wit’ him after all of this time just because it didn’t work out a 100% in my favor. I want this dude’s record to come out, and I want him to win, and I want him to be everything I worked my a.ss off for him to be.

DX: But right now, with you not there, and just the way things are looking right now, he may very well fail.

The D.O.C.: Well, I wouldn’t put that in the air, ‘cause that’s my boy. And one thing that he’s always said is, “I ain’t been wrong yet.” That’s his favorite saying. “I ain’t been wrong yet, so ride wit’ me.” So, I gotta ride wit’ him.

His production skills are still unlike anybody else. His ears is still unlike anybody else’s. It’s just about finding that right message. The times have changed; the kids are on some different sh*t. You don’t have to be the hardest n*gga on the street to be the hardest n*gga on a record. And [you can] actually say some sh*t that means some sh*t and it touch more muthafu*kas these days on the street level - especially coming from Dre. He’s the history of west coast Rap music. You take away Dre from west coast Rap and there is no west coast Rap.

DX: But that guy from Dallas, he had a lot to do with it.

The D.O.C.: You take away that cat from Dallas from Dre and you might not have no Dre. [Laughs] Nah, you’d have a Dre. He was way too good. That’s why I followed him so easy. I like to tell him that before the world knew he was great I knew it, and believed it. And he knew the same thing [about me]. He likes to joke and say when I drove that car off the freeway that I fu*ked off his money. Which used to really p!ss me off, to be honest wit’chu. Don’t say no sh*t like that, muthafu*ka. But, Dre’s got a really warped sense of humor and he meant it with love. What he was saying was, n*gga, we was supposed to make all kinds of money making music together. And it’s the truth. ‘Cause I understand that dudes production probably better than anybody else that’s ever been on one of his beats. … I understand what Dre means to do when he’s making those drums, the picture that he’s trying to paint. So I just write the words to fit the picture. The song ain’t really about me; the song has its own life. I’m just the muthafu*ka that wrote it.

And I gotta give kudos to Jay-Z, ‘cause he’s the only person that I’ve ever heard…say that the Rap artist is like an instrument. That our job is to find our place inside the beat where you don’t disturb the groove, and say whatever you gotta say. You know, play your horn. Don’t make muthafu*kas not be able to bob their head to the drums [because they’re distracted by] what you got to say. That’s what makes Eminem so great. Eminem, he doesn’t miss a fu*kin’ tick in the [beat]. He’s on every fu*kin’ hit of the hi-hat.

DX: That must’ve been a little surreal when you met him …. Like, This dude? This guy? Really? [Laughs]

The D.O.C.: I was over Dre’s house. … And Dre says, “I got somebody I want you to hear.” And he played the record “I Just Don’t Give A fu*k.” And I was like, “Wow, this muthafu*ka is off the chain, Doc. You got you one.” Then he showed me the picture of him and I was like, “What?! Are you fu*kin’ serious?! This muthafu*ka is great!”

DX: [Laughs] What’s Em think of [you]; was he paying homage when y’all met?

The D.O.C.: Last time I saw Eminem he had sent a CD of the No One Can Do It Better album to the studio for me to autograph and send it back to him.


 5 years ago '12        #7
ThePainkiller 347 heat pts347
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I just want to know what he knows about the Pac shooting.
 5 years ago '11        #8
ChickBoss414 27 heat pts27 OP
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 ThePainkiller said:
I just want to know what he knows about the Pac shooting.
He did leave that out there like there is somethin to be said about it....Yet, at this rate...most conclusions come back to Suge Knight, and thats what seems to have been implied by The D.O.C.'s response...
 5 years ago '11        #9
ChickBoss414 27 heat pts27 OP
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 Peterparker said:
great interview...we would probably be puttin him on the G.O.A.T. level if his voice never gave out.
 5 years ago '04        #10
bigjoshi2002 12 heat pts12
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Eazy-E was into devil worshiping. That was one thing I didn't like about this interview when it dropped. The fact that he covered up for Eazy. Bizzy already confirmed that Eazy was into that and pushed Bone Thugs to go there with it in their music. Napoleon who used to be on the Outlawz confirmed that Bone communicated with spirits and the spirits helped them with their music. Eazy even called himself the devil's son in law on track.
 5 years ago '11        #11
ChickBoss414 27 heat pts27 OP
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 bigjoshi2002 said:
Eazy-E was into devil worshiping. That was one thing I didn't like about this interview when it dropped. The fact that he covered up for Eazy. Bizzy already confirmed that Eazy was into that and pushed Bone Thugs to go there with it in their music. Napoleon who used to be on the Outlawz confirmed that Bone communicated with spirits and the spirits helped them with their music. Eazy even called himself the devil's son in law on track.
-- Soooo..what exactly is it that you are saying? You didnt like the idea that Eazy-E (allegedly) worshipped the devil? Or did you pick up on all the other tangible information provided about the smoke and mirrors of Ruthless and death Row Records and why Dr. Dre has had a problem creating the sonic creations he used to because him and The D.O.C. havent been on the same page in a while?
 5 years ago '07        #12
Sleazy 2 heat pts
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I was really arrogant back then. I used to tell them muthafu*kas all the time, “If it wasn’t for me, y’all n*ggas wouldn’t have sh*t!” Which may be why n*ggas is trying to sh*t on me now, because payback is a muthafu*ka.
/thread

This guy fu*ked it up for himself.
 5 years ago '11        #13
ChickBoss414 27 heat pts27 OP
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 Sleazy said:
/thread

This guy fu*ked it up for himself.
-- How so? Dre knew how talented he was/is and asked him to leave Texas...His debut album is considered a phenomenal pillar of the hip-hop world. Like he said, when Ice Cube left, who wrote n*ggaZ4LIFE? Even AFTER losing his voice he groomed snoop and ghostwrote for Dre...among others. As he said in the interviews he got screwed for caring too much about the music and not the business....He had too much trust in Dre to show him love and watch his back...when in business....especially the music business, you have to protect your own interests first....

Karma is a muthafu*ka indeed...but thats like saying Muhammad Ali was once this loud and boisterous sh*t-talking dude that was an other-wordly boxer and now he is a shell of himself because of Parkinson's disease....did he bring that on himself?
 5 years ago '04        #14
bigjoshi2002 12 heat pts12
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 ChickBoss414 said:
-- Soooo..what exactly is it that you are saying? You didnt like the idea that Eazy-E (allegedly) worshipped the devil? Or did you pick up on all the other tangible information provided about the smoke and mirrors of Ruthless and death Row Records and why Dr. Dre has had a problem creating the sonic creations he used to because him and The D.O.C. havent been on the same page in a while?
I think I was pretty clear in my first post. I don't care to speak on anything else in regards to the interview.
 5 years ago '07        #15
Sleazy 2 heat pts
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 ChickBoss414 said:
-- How so? Dre knew how talented he was/is and asked him to leave Texas...His debut album is considered a phenomenal pillar of the hip-hop world. Like he said, when Ice Cube left, who wrote n*ggaZ4LIFE? Even AFTER losing his voice he groomed snoop and ghostwrote for Dre...among others. As he said in the interviews he got screwed for caring too much about the music and not the business....He had too much trust in Dre to show him love and watch his back...when in business....especially the music business, you have to protect your own interests first....

Karma is a muthafu*ka indeed...but thats like saying Muhammad Ali was once this loud and boisterous sh*t-talking dude that was an other-wordly boxer and now he is a shell of himself because of Parkinson's disease....did he bring that on himself?
I read the whole interview. He comes off as a pompous, bitter n*gga. No one is denying the great music he made. He is very well respected amongst certain Hip-Hop communities. However he fu*ked himself out of success by partying his a.ss off and failing to acknowledge what was going on in his world.

This was a very sad interview. He spends half the time beating into our heads that without him there would be no Dre, Ice Cube, Eazy, NWA, Snoop, Em, 50 Cent etc. He's so full of himself.
 5 years ago '11        #16
ChickBoss414 27 heat pts27 OP
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 Sleazy said:
I read the whole interview. He comes off as a pompous, bitter n*gga. No one is denying the great music he made. He is very well respected amongst certain Hip-Hop communities. However he fu*ked himself out of success by partying his a.ss off and failing to acknowledge what was going on in his world.

This was a very sad interview. He spends half the time beating into our heads that without him there would be no Dre, Ice Cube, Eazy, NWA, Snoop, Em, 50 Cent etc. He's so full of himself.


-- WOW...didnt read into like that. He conceded his arrogance and ignorance. He stated how Dre was disappointed in the behaviors that eventually seemed to be karma kicking him in the a.ss by taking his voice. Yet, if he labored (naively/ignorantly) to build N.W.A., Dr.Dre's brand --as death Row, and Snoop, among subsequent others...outside of resigning to his fate and STILL showing Dre respect and love...where dont we see his true contribution(s). I dont know if you read the other thread I referred to at the start of this one....but there were quite a few of the same sentiments laced in some of those other members of N.W.A. & The Posse....thats why I found it so interesting to post this...
 5 years ago '07        #17
Sleazy 2 heat pts
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It is a very interesting post. Being from Dallas myself, I gave it a read because The D.O.C. is someone I never really gave a listen to. For every big "something" that came from nothing, there are a handful of D.O.C.'s. People who can't distinguish business from pleasure. Money changes everything. It's a jungle out there. He failed to realize that. His own brother flat out said it, "Lawyer up."

Maybe I would be a little more sympathetic if he didn't come off so full of himself. I wonder if Dre even speaks to this guy.
 5 years ago '11        #18
ChickBoss414 27 heat pts27 OP
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 Sleazy said:
It is a very interesting post. Being from Dallas myself, I gave it a read because The D.O.C. is someone I never really gave a listen to. For every big "something" that came from nothing, there are a handful of D.O.C.'s. People who can't distinguish business from pleasure. Money changes everything. It's a jungle out there. He failed to realize that. His own brother flat out said it, "Lawyer up."

Maybe I would be a little more sympathetic if he didn't come off so full of himself. I wonder if Dre even speaks to this guy.

Indeed, as a kid, I used to always try to understand why EPMD used to stress in interviews why they named their respective albums the way they did. Business is "never personal".....its business....it supercedes personal relationships, love, friendship, etc. I can only say that in 1989, The D.O.C. left an impression on me creatively that still gives me chills to this day. I wish he couldve had another shot at greatness....but....if he has reserved to his fate, I can only hold on to those memories of what could have been.

(And I am sure that knocking up Erykah Badu wasnt a bad consellation prize either!)
 5 years ago '07        #19
r.burgundy 16 heat pts16
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neva knew d.o.c was from dallas.that car accident k!lled him
 5 years ago '10        #20
Bandito 92 heat pts92
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 bigjoshi2002 said:
Eazy-E was into devil worshiping. That was one thing I didn't like about this interview when it dropped. The fact that he covered up for Eazy. Bizzy already confirmed that Eazy was into that and pushed Bone Thugs to go there with it in their music. Napoleon who used to be on the Outlawz confirmed that Bone communicated with spirits and the spirits helped them with their music. Eazy even called himself the devil's son in law on track.
Did you read the interview? He said that was just Eazy fu*king with him.
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