The Official "The Dark Knight Rises" Review Thread - (Reactions will start coming in Today)

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 07-18-2012, 09:05 AM         #421
Illstreet  OP
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Lou Lumenick, NY Post - Rating 4/4:

Best Knight of your life
You’ve got Bale! Final flick in the Batman trilogy rises to the top


Batman is lured back into action after a lengthy hiatus — to prevent a terrorist from nuking a Gotham City closely resembling the Big Apple — in the imposingly dark and hugely entertaining “The Dark Knight Rises.’’

Superhero movies are perhaps the most predicable genre out there right now (sorry, Marvel fans), but take it from someone who can usually spot plot twists half an hour away: Christopher Nolan’s dramatically and emotionally satisfying wrap-up to the Dark Knight trilogy adroitly avoids clichés and gleefully subverts your expectations at every turn.

Midway through, I was having some doubts about whether Nolan could pull it off.

But boy, does he ever. In the last half hour, everything clicks smashingly together, also tying in characters and situations from the first two films — as well as featuring some of the most emotional sequences ever from a director who has a deserved reputation for coolly cerebral work.

Bale does the best acting of his career here as the anguished hero, and Hathaway is far more effective than I could have imagined, bringing humor to her role without edging into camp (and no, Selina’s never referred to as Catwoman,

“The Dark Knight Rises’’ builds to a pulse-pounding, nail-biting climax that’s loaded with the kind of surprises that were so absent in some other recent superhero movies that I could mention.

Nolan’s apocalyptic, 9/11-inflected vision of Manhattan and its hero are far more viscerally engaging in a real-world way than the fan-pandering, silly fantasy counterparts that Marvel offered up in both “The Avengers’’ and “The Amazing Spider-Man.’’
 07-18-2012, 09:34 AM         #422
endless lies  OP
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 Illstreet said:
We get it... You're a Marvel Stan... Fukk off.
Rest easy, bro. I didn't say anything about Marvel. In fact, all I was doing in that post was saying how hotly anticipated this movie will be. I'm putting money in Warner Bros pockets just like you and everybody else. Calm down son.
 07-18-2012, 09:37 AM         #423
endless lies  OP
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 Nu Tymez said:
LOL.. It appears the Chicago Tribune's critic gave The Dark Knight Rises a bad review... Seems based only on it being "too dark and grim"...

That's the problem. People have got it in their heads that there are no limits to what should/shouldn't be done in a movie like this. There really IS such a thing as being too dark for a PG-13 superhero flick.


I find it sooo ironic how the tagline for The Dark Knight was "Why so serious?" when that movie clearly takes itself more seriously than every single superhero film ever made combined.
 5 years ago '08        #424
Arson 84 heat pts84
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 5 years ago '04        #425
C.R.I.P. 3 heat pts
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im taking my family to see it in a regular theater at midnight and then on Friday after work Im going dolo to see it in Imax.

I can't believe there are not more Imax theaters in Atlanta.
 07-18-2012, 09:44 AM         #426
endless lies  OP
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 Arson said:

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No.


...They didn't...


 5 years ago '04        #427
JFamis 235 heat pts235
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 endless lies said:
That's the problem. People have got it in their heads that there are no limits to what should/shouldn't be done in a movie like this. There really IS such a thing as being too dark for a PG-13 superhero flick.


I find it sooo ironic how the tagline for The Dark Knight was "Why so serious?" when that movie clearly takes itself more seriously than every single superhero film ever made combined.
There's actually not really a limit. If Nolan wants to tell the story this way, that's his decision. Not everyone has to like it. People are acting like this sh*t is a poorly reviewed movie. Anything above 80% is damn good.
 07-18-2012, 09:55 AM         #428
endless lies  OP
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 JFamis said:
There's actually not really a limit. If Nolan wants to tell the story this way, that's his decision. Not everyone has to like it. People are acting like this sh*t is a poorly reviewed movie. Anything above 80% is damn good.
Yes there is a limit.

And Nolan can do whatever he wants. We all know this. Whether or not the movie will be good, however, is a different story.





And right now it looks like it won't be.
 5 years ago '04        #429
JFamis 235 heat pts235
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 endless lies said:
Yes there is a limit.

And Nolan can do whatever he wants. We all know this. Whether or not the movie will be good, however, is a different story.





And right now it looks like it won't be.
No, there isn't a limit. I hate superhero movies, but I love Nolan's. All those Marvel movies are the same. It doesn't need to follow that formula.
 5 years ago '10        #430
shadydre85 34 heat pts34
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the closest imax to me has been sold out for TWO MONTHS!! so now i gotta go 2 townships over to the imax over there to go see it i called befor i left and the guy said he has 6 tickets left so im leaving now to go grab them for me and my girl. wish me luck
 07-18-2012, 10:24 AM         #431
Illstreet  OP
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 endless lies said:
Yes there is a limit.

And Nolan can do whatever he wants. We all know this. Whether or not the movie will be good, however, is a different story.





And right now it looks like it won't be.
@ right now it doesn't look like it'll be gpod.

I hate newly created troll SN's.
 5 years ago '06        #432
coolio 57 heat pts57
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it's rising again



also i've made it official that any female reviewer that gave it a rotten rating does not count seeing as their womanly bodies lack the intelligence and upper body strength to properly review a movie like this..so instead of being at 87% at the moment, it's officially at 89%
 5 years ago '05        #433
Deeangoe 2 heat pts
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im having dreams about seeing this sh*t already
 5 years ago '04        #434
C.R.I.P. 3 heat pts
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 Deeangoe said:
im having dreams about seeing this sh*t already
Man i've been waiting so long for this film that its surreal that its only a day away.
 5 years ago '05        #435
Bobby's World 9 heat pts
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 endless lies said:
Yes there is a limit.

And Nolan can do whatever he wants. We all know this. Whether or not the movie will be good, however, is a different story.





And right now it looks like it won't be.
Lol what? There's no limit as long as its true to the Batman universe. We already got the bright, cheery funny, sometimes even borderline gay renditions of Batman. They sold, but in the bigger scheme of things people stopped taking the Batman franchise seriously.

Now that Nolan has gotten things back on track and made movies depicting a serious Batman dealing with serious situations, like the Batman from the comics...he's too serious. Lol.
Over the limit. Lol. His seriousness is getting in the way of the movie being good.

Do these people even know what they watching? He's the goddamned Batman...
 07-18-2012, 01:53 PM         #436
texasplayboy_23  OP
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I'm stuck overseas and PISSED I'm about to miss out on this opportunity.



































































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 07-18-2012, 01:58 PM         #437
Illstreet  OP
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Posting this purely for Comedic Purposes... Rex Reed(has never given a Positive Review to a Nolan Movie, hates his guts) has delievered a HILARIOUSLY NEGATIVE Review...





Rex Reed - The Observer - Rating "1/4":

“Get with the program!” scolds another letter from a brainwashed fan of the Batman-as-seen-through-the-pretentiousness-of-the-Christopher-Nolan trilogy, “You are a dinosaur!” He’s probably right, and I probably would—if I could only make one lick of sense out of what this nonsense is all about. Silly pop-culture comic book cinema about grown men in rubber masks and Styrofoam jock straps is bad enough, but incomprehensible gibberish to boot is just plain unacceptable. Halfheartedly, I give The Dark Knight Rises—the third and final Batflick in the Nolan trilogy—one star for eardrum-busting sound effects and glaucoma-inducing computerized images in blinding Imax, but talk about stretching things. That’s all most immature audiences require for their hard-earned money these days. The rest of it should not be reviewed by anyone over the age of 12.

As caped crusaders go, I prefer Superman, Spider Man and, above all, Captain Marvel, who has been criminally ignored by the movies so far. (Can’t you just see Michael Fassbender staring into the camera hissing “Shazam!”?) And as Batman goes, I had a lot more fun when he was f!ghting off Catwoman and The Joker at the Saturday afternoon double features of my youth in his campy bat cave with his jailbait roommate Robin. Drat! Christopher Nolan sent Bruce Wayne to a shrink and Batman lost his mojo. I like one caption writer’s description of the Batman epics as “car pr0n for geeks and gearheads.” But that doesn’t make The Dark Knight Rises any better. Trash is trash, but when it costs an estimated $250 million (bat food compared to The Amazing Spider-Man’s $137 million), the charges turn criminal and someone should subject the garbage man to a citizen’s arrest.

Like all previous flicks directed by Christopher Nolan and written by his brother Jonathan, this one defies logic and reeks of repulsive, bloated self-importance (not to be confused with anything resembling narrative) and the arrogant conviction that no matter how slick, obtuse, confounding or incompetent it gets, the fanboys will slobber approval.

Christian Bale mumbles and whispers through an echo chamber, changing his appearance and his voice for reasons known only to Mr. Nolan. Michael Caine chews holes through his dialogue with a peat-bog c*ckney accent so thick you can’t understand what he’s talking about anyway.

The Nolan brothers seem to be making it up as they go along. Not one character is developed beyond a flat, one-dimensional cardboard paper-doll construct without heart and soul, not to mention flesh and blood. Not one of these distractions invades the plot for any purpose except to extend the running time. Speaking lines they cannot possibly understand, not one actor makes any attempt to be believable. So manufactured and synthetic that they eventually lose all sense of reality, they’re like reconstituted orange juice and processed cheese.

Turning a mosh pit of mystical comic book gimmicks into a money pit of metaphysical mumbo jumbo, Christopher Nolan gives new meaning to both DUI and DWI—“Directing Under the Influence” and “Directing While Intoxicated”—while raking in millions. I’ll have what he’s having.




I swear to God Nolan must have fukked this dudes chick when he first came in the industry. His pure hatred for him is unreal.

 07-18-2012, 02:06 PM         #438
Illstreet  OP
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Kenneth Turan - The L.A. Times - EXTREMELY POSITIVE:

Review: 'The Dark Knight Rises' more than shines, and on many levels

The third and final Batman movie from director Christopher Nolan is mercilessly brilliant and exemplifies masterful filmmaking.


Potent, persuasive and hypnotic, "The Dark Knight Rises" has us at its mercy. A disturbing experience we live through as much as a film we watch, this dazzling conclusion to director Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy is more than an exceptional superhero movie, it is masterful filmmaking by any standard. So much so that, its considerable 2-hour, 44-minute length notwithstanding, as soon as it's over, all you want to do is see it all over again.

That desire comes despite — or perhaps because of — the fact that "The Dark Knight Rises" might be the bleakest, most despairing superhero film ever made. It uses a wholly terrifying villain to emphasize the physical vulnerability of a hero we sometimes forget is no more than human. And it underscores the black moods and sense of dark destiny that have always clustered around the psyche of billionaire Bruce Wayne and his somber compulsion to f!ght crime.

Also, and almost unheard of in a superhero context, "Dark Knight Rises" brings a whiff of contemporary societal trends — or what Nolan has called "the things that worry us these days" — into play. His film coolly mocks the pieties of both the right and the left, starting with a jaundiced look at how law and order-obsessed societies start to rot from the inside when they are based on lies.

The impressive success of "The Dark Knight Rises" pleasantly confounds our notions as to where great filmmaking is to be found in today's world. To have a director this gifted turning his ability and attention to such an unapologetically commercial project is beyond heartening in an age in which the promise of film as a popular art is tarnished almost beyond recognition. Wouldn't it be nice if the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which snubbed the trilogy's first two films in the best picture race, finally got the message?
 5 years ago '05        #439
DaOmega_1 271 heat pts271
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“The Dark Knight Rises’’ builds to a pulse-pounding, nail-biting climax that’s loaded with the kind of surprises that were so absent in some other recent superhero movies that I could mention.
Nolan’s apocalyptic, 9/11-inflected vision of Manhattan and its hero are far more viscerally engaging in a real-world way than the fan-pandering, silly fantasy counterparts that Marvel offered up in both “The Avengers’’ and “The Amazing Spider-Man.’’


4 stars (out of 4)

So much for negative New York critics...
 07-18-2012, 02:14 PM         #440
Illstreet  OP
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Manohla Dargis - The New York Times - POSITIVE :

After seven years and two films that have pushed Batman ever deeper into the dark, the director Christopher Nolan has completed his postmodern, post-Sept. 11 epic of ambivalent good versus multidimensional evil with a burst of light. As the title promises, day breaks in “The Dark Knight Rises,” the grave and satisfying finish to Mr. Nolan’s operatic bat-trilogy. His timing couldn’t be better. As the country enters its latest electoral brawl off screen, Batman (Christian Bale) hurtles into a parallel battle that booms with puppet-master anarchy, anti-government rhetoric and soundtrack drums of doom, entering the fray as another lone avenger and emerging as a defender of, well, what?

Truth, justice and the American way? No — and not only because that doctrine belongs to Superman, who was bequeathed that weighty motto on the radio in August 1942, eight months after the United States entered World War II and three years after Batman, Bob Kane’s comic creation, hit. Times change; superheroes and villains too. The enemy is now elusive and the home front as divided as the face of Harvey Dent, a vanquished Batman foe. The politics of partisanship rule and grass-roots movements have sprung up on the right and the left to occupy streets and legislative seats. It can look ugly, but as they like to say — and Dent says in “The Dark Knight,” the second part of the trilogy — the night is darkest before the dawn.

The legacy of Dent, an activist district attorney turned murderous lunatic, looms over this one, the literal and metaphysical personification of good intentions gone disastrously wrong. (He looms even more in Imax, which is the way to see the film.) Eight years later in story time, Batman, having taken the fall for Dent’s death, and mourning the woman both men loved, has retreated into the shadows. Dent has been enshrined as a martyr, held up as an immaculate defender of law-and-order absolutism. Gotham City is quiet and so too is life at Wayne Manor, where its master hobbles about with a cane while a prowler makes off with family jewels (the intensely serious Mr. Nolan isn’t wholly humorless) and Gotham sneers about the playboy who’s mutated into a Howard Hughes recluse.

Batman has always been a head case, of course: the billionaire orphan, a k a Bruce Wayne, who for a.ssorted reasons — like witnessing the murder of his parents when he was a child — f!ghts crime disguised as a big bat. Bruce’s initial metamorphosis, in “Batman Begins,” exacts a high price: by the end of the second film, along with losing the girl and being branded a vigilante, Bruce-Batman rides virtually alone, save for Commissioner Gordon (Gary Oldman) and the Wayne family butler, Alfred (Michael Caine), a fussy uncle with a remarkable skill set. It’s central to where Mr. Nolan wants to take “The Dark Knight Rises” that Batman will be picking up new acquaintances, including a beat cop, John Blake (a charming Joseph Gordon-Levitt), and a philanthropist, Miranda Tate (Marion Cotillard).

Mr. Nolan again sets his machine purring with two set pieces that initiate one of the story’s many dualities, in this case between large spectacle and humanizing intimacies: one, an outlandishly choreographed blowout that introduces a heavy, Bane (Tom Hardy); the other, a quieter cat-and-bat duet between Bruce and a burglar, Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway). After checking in with his personal armorer, Lucius Fox (Morgan Freeman), Bruce-Batman swoops into an intrigue that circles back to the first film and brings the series to a politically resonant conclusion that fans and op-ed bloviators will argue over long after this one leaves theaters. Once again, like his two-faced opponents and the country he’s come to represent, Batman begins, feared as a vigilante, revered as a hero.

Informed by Kane’s original comic and Frank Miller’s resuscitation of the character in the 1980s, Mr. Nolan’s Bruce-Batman has oscillated between seemingly opposite poles, even as he’s always come out a superhero. He is savior and destroyer, human and beast, the ultimate radical individualist and people’s protector. Yet as the series evolved, this binary opposition — echoed by Dent’s rived face — has grown progressively messier, less discrete. Much of the complexity has been directly written into the franchise’s overarching, seemingly blunt story of good versus evil. It’s an old, familiar tale that Mr. Nolan, in between juggling the cool bat toys, demure kisses, hard punches and loud bangs, has layered with open and barely veiled references to terrorism, the surveillance state and vengeance as a moral imperative.

In “The Dark Knight Rises” Mr. Nolan, working from a script he wrote with his brother Jonathan, further muddies the good-and-evil divide with Bane. A swaggering, overmuscled brute with a scar running down his back like a zipper and headgear that obscures his face and turns his cultivated voice into a strangulated wheeze, Bane comes at Batman and Gotham hard. Fortified by armed true believers, Bane first beats Batman in a punishingly visceral, intimate fist-to-foot f!ght and then commandeers the city with a massive a.ssault that leaves it crippled and — because of the explosions, the dust, the panic and the sweeping aerial shots of a very real-looking New York City — invokes the Sept 11 attacks. It’s unsettling enough that some may find it tough going.

Watching a city collapse should be difficult, maybe especially in a comic-book movie. The specter of Sept. 11 and its aftermath haunt American movies often through their absence though also in action films, which adopt torture as an ineluctable necessity. Mr. Nolan, for his part, has been engaging Sept. 11 in his blockbuster behemoths, specifically in a vision of Batman who stands between right and wrong, principles and their perversions, because he himself incarnates both extremes.

Mr. Nolan has also taken the duality that made the first film into an existential drama and expanded that concept to encompass questions about power, the state and whether change is best effected from inside the system or outside it. Gordon believes in its structures; Bane wants to burn it all down. And Batman? Well, he needs to work it out.

So will viewers, explicitly given the grim, unsettling vision of a lawless city in which the structures of civil society have fallen, structures that Batman has fought outside of. In a formally bravura, disturbingly visceral sequence that clarifies the stakes, Bane stands before a prison and, in a film with several references to the brutal excesses of the French Revolution — including the suitably titled “A Tale of Two Cities” — delivers an apocalyptic speech worthy of Robespierre. Invoking myths of opportunism, Bane promises the Gotham citizenry that courts will be convened, spoils enjoyed. “Do as you please,” he says, as Mr. Nolan cuts to a well-heeled city stretch where women in furs and men in silk robes are attacked in what looks like a paroxysm of revolutionary bloodlust.

If this image of violent revolt resonates strongly, it’s due to Mr. Nolan’s kinetic filmmaking in a scene that pulses with realism and to the primal fear that the people could at any moment, as in the French Revolution, become the mob that drags the rest of us into chaos. Yet little is what it first seems in “The Dark Knight Rises,” whether masked men or raging rhetoric. Mr. Nolan isn’t overtly siding with or taking aim at any group (the wily Bane only talks a good people’s revolution), but as he has done before, he is suggesting a third way. Like Steven Soderbergh in “Contagion,” a science-fiction freak-out in which the heroes are government workers, Mr. Nolan doesn’t advocate burning down the world, but fixing it.

He also, it may be a relief to know, wants to entertain you. He does, for the most part effortlessly, in a Dark Knight saga that is at once lighter and darker than its antecedents. It’s also believable and preposterous, effective as a closing chapter and somewhat of a letdown if only because Mr. Nolan, who continues to refine his cinematic technique, hasn’t surmounted “The Dark Knight” or coaxed forth another performance as mesmerizingly vital as Heath Ledger’s Joker in that film. The ferocious, perversely uglified Mr. Hardy, unencumbered by Bane’s facial appliance, might have been able to dominate this one the way Mr. Ledger did the last, but that sort of monstrous, bigger-than-life turn would have been antithetical to this movie’s gestalt. The accomplished Mr. Bale continues to keep Batman at a remove with a tight performance that jibes with Mr. Nolan’s head-over-heart filmmaking.

After repeatedly sending Batman down Gotham’s mean streets, Mr. Nolan ends by taking him somewhere new. That’s precisely the point of a late sequence in which he shifts between a multitude of characters and as many locations without losing you, his narrative thread or momentum. His playfulness with the scenes-within-scenes in his last movie, “Inception,” has paid off here. The action interludes are more visually coherent than in his previous Batman films and, as in “Inception,” the controlled fragmentation works on a pleasurable, purely cinematic level. But it also serves Mr. Nolan’s larger meaning in “The Dark Knight Rises” and becomes his final say on superheroes and their uses because, as Gotham rages and all seems lost, the action shifts from a lone figure to a group, and hope springs not from one but many.



The New York Times usually dislikes Nolan's films... Very suprised and pleased to see this one.


Last edited by Illstreet; 07-18-2012 at 02:17 PM..
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