The Official "The Dark Knight Rises" Review Thread - (Reactions will start coming in Today)

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Props Slaps
 07-15-2012, 03:00 PM         #261
Illstreet  OP
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To be very clear...

Did Kubrick make the Greatest Film of All Time? No. (highly subjective and 2001 COULD be argued, but very few would list one of his as their Definitive #1 film)

Does Kubrick have the Greatest Filmography of All Time? No. (Again Subjective, but Scorsese's, Kurosawa's, and arguably many others are better... Hitch, Bergman, Ford, Kazan, Wyler, etc)

Does Kubrick have the most Masterpieces? No. (He doesn't even have 4 films better than Coppola's 4 Best)

Did one of Kubrick's films contain the Greatest performance ever put to screen? Hell no.


So why is Kubrick untouchable again?... Why is it a travesty to compare anyone to him???????

Because he was extremely proficient technically? Because he was always provocative? Because he was eccentric????

It's a load of bullsh*t you've been sold into believing by the(hate to take it here) Jewish hierarchy that owns and writes the majority of the history of this industry and artform. That's just the reality of it. Sorry. The same as Black folk who would/still do dismiss Bird during the Magic rivalry, or white folk from 8-9 years ago in Giants Staduim being 85% Shockey Jerseys instead of Strahans.

Races/Ethinicities tend to elevate their own. And very few have the ability to shape/influence opinion on such matters by owning the establishment that creates the myths quite like Jewish folk do in Hollywood/The Entertainment Industry. And that's why Kubrick has developed this percieved invincibility/uncomparibility over the years.

*Coming from a Kubrick fan and someone who has no problem with people of the Jewish Race*

He was a GREAT Filmmaker... He was not Christ Returned to Earth... And his work was not beyond reproach or comparison...

End of discussion.


Last edited by Illstreet; 07-15-2012 at 06:08 PM..
 07-15-2012, 03:05 PM         #262
youknowmystelo  OP
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 Illstreet said:
To be very clear...

Did Kubrick make the Greatest Film of All Time? No. (highly subjective and 2001 COULD be argued, but very few would list one of his as their Definitive #1 film)

Does Kubrick have the Greatest Filmography of All Time? No. (Again Subjective, but Scorsese's, Kurosawa's, and arguably many others are better... Hitch, Bergman, Ford, Kazan, Wyler, etc)

Does Kubrick have the most Masterpieces? No. (He doesn't even have 4 films better than Coppola's 4 Best)

Did one of Kubrick's films contain the Greatest performance ever put to screen? Hell no.


So why is Kubrick untouchable again?... Why is it a travesty to compare anyone to him???????

Because he was a extremely proficient technically? Because he was always provoative? Because he was eccentric????

It's a load of bullsh*t you've been sold into believing by the(hate to take it here) Jewish hierarchy that owns and writes the majority of the history of this industry and artform. That's just the reality of it. Sorry. The same as Black folk who would/still do dismiss Bird during the Magic rivalry, or white folk from 8-9 years ago in Giants Staduim being 85% Shockey Jerseys instead of Strahans.

Races/Ethinicities tend to elevate their own. And very few have the ability to shape/influence opinion on such matters by owning the establishment that creates the myths quite like Jewish folk do in Hollywood/The Entertainment Industry. And that's why Kubrick has developed this percieved invincibility/uncomparibility over the years.

*Coming from a Kubrick fan and someone who has no problem with people of the Jewish Race*

He was a GREAT Filmmaker... He was not Christ Returned to Earth... And his work was not beyond reproach or comparison...

End of discussion.
This whole post is an oxymoron.
 07-15-2012, 05:42 PM         #263
Illstreet  OP
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 youknowmystelo said:
This whole post is an oxymoron.
Being a fan of someone but not Stanning them usually is to a Stan.

It's the facts(the historical context of his achievements)... And unfortunately the reality of human nature.

It is what it is...
 07-15-2012, 05:49 PM         #264
youknowmystelo  OP
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 Illstreet said:
Being a fan of someone but not Stanning them usually is to a Stan.

It's the facts(the historical context of his achievements)... And unfortunately the reality of human nature.

It is what it is...


Now you're saying his achievements is solely because of his Jewish hierarchy.
 07-15-2012, 05:58 PM         #265
Illstreet  OP
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 youknowmystelo said:


Now you're saying his achievements is solely because of his Jewish hierarchy.
No one even remotely said that and you know it.

Stop the Trolling.
 5 years ago '04        #266
JFamis 235 heat pts235
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Empire gave it five stars...

With spectacle in abundance and s3xiness in (supporting) parts, this is superhero filmmaking on an unprecedented scale. Rises may lack the surprise of Begins or the anarchy of Knight, but it makes up for that in pure emotion. A fitting epitaph for the hero Gotham deserves.
 5 years ago '07        #267
Bleezy 10 heat pts10
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 5 years ago '07        #268
Jayceon 492 heat pts492
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@spleenter
"Best conclusion to a film I have seen since ‘The Shawshank Redemption"

this.. this is the one that got me.
 07-16-2012, 06:01 AM         #269
YesUcantCme  OP
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Were them spoilers at....
 07-16-2012, 09:39 AM         #270
Illstreet  OP
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Todd McCarthy, "The Hollywood Reporter":

The real world threats of terrorism, political anarchy and economic instability make deep incursions into the cinematic comic book domain in*The Dark Knight Rises. Big-time Hollywood filmmaking at its most massively accomplished, this last installment of Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy makes everything in the rival Marvel universe look thoroughly silly and childish. Entirely enveloping and at times unnerving in a relevant way one would never have imagined, as a cohesive whole this ranks as the best of Nolan's trio, even if it lacks -- how could it not? -- an element as unique as Heath Ledger's immortal turn in The Dark Knight. It's a blockbuster by any standard.
Needing to portray both his characters as vulnerable, even perishable, Bale is at his series best in this film. At times in the past his voice seemed too artificially deepened and transformed; there's a bit of that here, but far less, and, as Bruce becomes impoverished and Batman incapacitated, the actor's nuances increase.
 07-16-2012, 09:45 AM         #271
Illstreet  OP
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"The Toronto Sun", Rating 5/5:

'Dark Knight' rises to perfect ending

The Dark Knight Rises is a spectacular and thrilling conclusion to Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy.

With Christian Bale portraying the brooding, conflicted Batman again -- probably for the last time -- this trilogy is now the best of its kind. Regardless of the number of installments, no other comic book franchise can boast being this great, so consistently, and for so long.

For audiences who want smart storytelling with their adrenaline rush, The Dark Knight Rises, which opens late Thursday, is as profoundly moving as it is dynamic. It is as intimate as it is huge, especially in the IMAX format. It is as surprising as it is predictable, thanks to plot twists that you don't see coming. It is as occasionally amusing as it is dark and brooding, and spikes of comic relief are welcome in all the madness.

This franchise is also deeply rooted in the 73-year history of Batman, including the Frank Miller phase. Yet Nolan also layered in original ideas. For example, The Dark Knight Rises is inspired by the French Revolution, with specific references to Charles d!ckens' epic historical novel, A Tale of Two Cities. As a result, there is a balance of the familiar and the fantastic that makes the movie both realistic and larger-than-life.
 07-16-2012, 09:55 AM         #272
Illstreet  OP
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HitFix.com, Rating "A":

In this film, the city becomes the final battle ground for Bruce Wayne's soul, his body, and his sanity, and he is pushed harder than ever before. Nolan seems to believe that a lie in service of something good is still a lie, and it's been festering. Every bad decision Bruce Wayne has made since the start of this series comes back to haunt him in this film, and fans would be advised to watch both of the earlier films to see how everything ties together. Bale's performance here is miles different than his work in either of the other films. In "Batman Begins," there is a boyish inexperience, and I like the material where he's figuring out this new identity for himself. Even though "The Dark Knight" is very dark at times, there's an exuberance to Bruce as he comes into his own, and he seems driven, pleased to have found a purpose. In this film, a sorrow has settled onto him, and even when he is suited up and in action, he barely seems like a shadow of the man he used to be. He's rotting from the inside, knowing full well what his actions have cost the people around him. He is dying because of the loss of Rachel in "The Dark Knight," and he doesn't seem to know how he can heal at all. The end of the first film, when Rachel confronts him about his identity, offers Bruce his one way out of things, and much of "The Dark Knight" deals with his struggle to take that escape route and what happens when it's taken from him forever. In this new film, he has no more hope, no more heart, and it makes him just as dangerous as Bane, but to himself more than anyone else.

We may never see superhero films quite like these again, and that's fine. Nolan had something special to say with his time in the trenches, and he's ended on his own terms. I suspect that the reaction to the film will be hotly divided, but I'm firmly on the side that this is a triumph, a victory for all involved, and one of the year's most impressive efforts so far in any genre, on any subject. "The Dark Knight Rises" confirms that these films have always had an endgame in mind, and it has been a remarkable ride, one I would not want to follow. Whoever Warner Bros hires to reboot the "Batman" films a few years from now, I wish you luck. The bar is as high as it could possibly be.
 07-16-2012, 10:04 AM         #273
Illstreet  OP
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IndieWire - Rating "A":

Review: Visceral 'The Dark Knight Rises' Is A Cinematic, Cultural & Personal Triumph

In a season filled with big movies that somehow ask even bigger questions, “The Dark Knight Rises” feels like the superego to its competition’s id. An action opus that manages at to be both viscerally and intellectually engaging, Christopher Nolan’s highly anticipated third Batman film comes full circle, examining both the Dark Knight and the society that produced him without sacrificing any of the sweeping thrills for which the series is known. A literate, thoughtful and invigorating finale, “The Dark Knight Rises” delivers everything audiences ask for and then some...

Looking piecemeal at “The Dark Knight Rises,” it feels like a movie of profound disillusionment about America that could only be objectively told by someone who’s not a native: Nolan dissects our current financial woes, our clash of cultures, even one-percent-versus-99-percent-style class warfare with a scalpel, a.ssigning culpability to all involved and condemning the whole system as a sort of demagogue-exchange program. From the corporate fat cats to the mouth breathers scraping by on pennies, everyone aspires to change their situation, to triumph over the forces of (sometimes rightful) opposition, or to wipe the slate clean and start again, and their motives are almost unilaterally unclean – either in motive or execution. The film should have its own Faustian bargain counter in the corner of the screen, ticking off bad decisions and foolhardy expectations.

As both Batman and Bruce Wayne, Christian Bale’s work here is master-class, and he gives the character such an inescapable melancholy – a certain perseverance in the face of absolute resignation to his fate – that he becomes a more tragic figure than ever.

It should be interesting to see precisely how the film translates to home video given the number of times within a scene the frame switches from IMAX to a traditional film format, but cinematically the film is gorgeous, meticulously constructed and seemingly effortless in execution, even with so many moving parts racing towards what is ultimately a both narratively and thematically cohesive finale. More importantly, however, is how it fits into the summer’s conversation about the Big Important Issues that are preoccupying us, even when we’re walking into darkened theaters and asking only to be entertained.

If, as Badass Digest argues, “The Avengers” “defeated irony and cynicism,” then “The Dark Knight Rises” feels like the rock-bottom, lowest-point examination of ourselves which provides the substance to make Joss Whedon’s optimistic vision endure. Because Nolan’s film is a reminder that superheroes aren’t merely a frivolous distraction, or even a wish-fulfillment fantasy, but an embodiment of our best selves – or at least what we want our best selves to be. A cinematic, cultural and personal triumph, “The Dark Knight Rises” is emotionally inspiring, aesthetically significant and critically important for America itself – as a mirror of both sober reflection and resilient hope.
 07-16-2012, 10:10 AM         #274
Illstreet  OP
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"Total Film" - Rating 5 Stars:

But before we let the cat out the bag, we want to make something clear: this is a Batman movie that's all about Batman.

And Christian Bale? Never more vulnerable, likeable or willing to get his gloves dirty, pushing to new emotional depths for his final Gotham go-around.

Verdict:

A smart, stirring spectacle that faces down impossible expectations to pull off a hugely satisfying end to business. Boy, you’re in for a show tonight…
 07-16-2012, 10:16 AM         #275
Illstreet  OP
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"Variety":

Few blockbusters have borne so heavy a burden of audience expectation as Christopher Nolan's final Batman caper, and the filmmaker steps up to the occasion with a cataclysmic vision of Gotham City under siege in "The Dark Knight Rises." Running an exhilarating, exhausting 164 minutes, Nolan's trilogy-capping epic sends Batman to a literal pit of despair, restoring him to the core of a legend that questions, and powerfully affirms, the need for heroism in a fallen world. If it never quite matches the brilliance of 2008's "The Dark Knight," this hugely ambitious action-drama nonetheless retains the moral urgency and serious-minded pulp instincts that have made the Warners franchise a beacon of integrity in an increasingly comicbook-driven Hollywood universe. Global B.O. domination awaits.

In a more gratifying development, the film reasserts the primacy of its title character and the general excellence of Bale's performance, forcing Wayne to reckon once and for all with the alter ego he's fashioned for himself and Gotham in the name of justice. If the point is that only a state of total desperation can push a person to greatness, Nolan movingly acknowledges the limits of lone-ranger justice, as Selina, Miranda, Gordon, Blake and Lucius Fox (Morgan Freeman), Wayne's old friend and gadgets expert, come to play crucial and sometimes unexpected roles in the twisty drama.
 07-16-2012, 10:37 AM         #276
Illstreet  OP
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IGN - Rating 9/10

“Why do we fall?” That was a question young Bruce Wayne was asked in Batman Begins and it’s one that's just as important in The Dark Knight Rises, the final installment in Christopher Nolan’s Batman saga. Borrowing a page from Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns, the film finds an older Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) who has hung up his (gas-powered grappling) guns and retreated into Wayne Manor, now a recluse who needs a cane due to all his injuries sustained as Batman.

So is The Dark Knight Rises better than The Dark Knight? If you were one of those fans who prefer Batman Begins to TDK then you’ll find much to love about TDKR. And if you weren’t then no Batman film will ever match TDK for you. Boasting scenes where all three main characters are together in masks and costumes, The Dark Knight Rises is certainly the most comic book-y of Nolan’s three Batman films. It’s also the most epic and lengthy one, and has the greatest inherent stakes and emotion. It’s imperative that one sees Batman Begins before watching TDKR; all you really need to know from The Dark Knight is that Dent became Two-Face, Batman took the fall, and Rachel Dawes died. (The Joker is never mentioned here.) There are plenty of callbacks in TDKR to Batman Begins that directly affect Bruce, the other characters, and Gotham.

Bale gives his finest performance yet in the role. With these three Batman films, he has brought to life the most fully-formed, multi-faceted screen superhero yet.

The aforementioned gripes aside, director Christopher Nolan and his team have delivered the grandest, most emotional and superheroic chapter in their Batman saga. The Dark Knight Rises is a fitting emotional and narrative conclusion to this particular interpretation of the enduring story of Bruce Wayne the man and Batman the legend.
 07-16-2012, 10:52 AM         #277
Illstreet  OP
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"The Telegraph" UK - Rating 5 Stars:

The Dark Knight Rises, the final Batman film in Christopher Nolan's trilogy starring Christian Bale, is a sinewy crime epic with some breathless action

Many critics and cinema-goers have wondered whether or not The Dark Knight, Christopher Nolan’s second Batman film, was really, in its essence, a superhero film. The key ingredients were all there on a superficial level – the costume, the techno toys, the cackling baddie bent on citywide destruction – but Nolan had stirred and synthesised them in new ways to craft a lucid, sinewy crime epic closer to Michael Mann’s Heat and Coppola’s second Godfather film than anything Marvel Studios has yet produced.

The scope here is unashamedly novelistic, and although the plotting of the film’s first act is arguably muddled, Nolan’s sheer formal audacity means the stakes feel skin-pricklingly high at all times: if he is prepared to go this far, I found myself often wondering, just how far is he prepared to go? Well, the answer is further than any other superhero film I can think of: after a breathless, bravura final act, a nuclear payload of catharsis brings The Dark Knight Rises, and Nolan’s trilogy, to a ferociously satisfying close.
 07-16-2012, 10:57 AM         #278
youknowmystelo  OP
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Three days and somewhat hours.
 07-16-2012, 10:57 AM         #279
Illstreet  OP
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"The List" - UK - Rating "5/5":

Christopher Nolan’s epic conclusion to his Batman trilogy is set to be the blockbuster of the year

If, as was rumoured, Christopher Nolan was initially reluctant to make a third Batman film, you wouldn’t know it from The Dark Knight Rises. Drawing from plotlines from both Batman Begins and The Dark Knight, it feels like it was always meant to be a trilogy. The late Heath Ledger’s The Joker may be absent, but there’s enough here to position Nolan’s latest as the blockbuster of 2012, crushing Prometheus and The Avengers with one leather-gloved fist.

But what is really glorious is how Nolan, aided by a terrific, soul-searching turn by Bale, keeps the focus on Wayne’s flawed, pain-soaked hero. Emotional, epic and entertaining, this is the end you’ve been waiting for.
 07-16-2012, 11:09 AM         #280
Illstreet  OP
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"Press Telegram" - Rating "4/4":

From its "wow" opening to an ending we can't reveal, "The Dark Knight Rises" is spectacular filmmaking. Ambitious on every level, it is more than a worthy successor to Christopher Nolan's previous two "Batman" movies, which already were far and away the best comic-book adaptations ever.

It may be early to throw out the word Oscar, but this film is like hitting a grand slam and throwing a no-hitter in the same game.
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