1994 Pac Shooting Full Info (Complete Available)

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Props Slaps
 05-16-2012, 01:45 PM         #1
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3rdcoasta 
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1994 Pac Shooting Full Info (Complete Available)
 

 
1994 QC Shooting Full Info (Complete Available)
The day before ‘Pac’s 40th birthday, a new revelation has emerged. Though his murder remains unsolved, AHH reports that Dexter Isaac, an a.ssociate of music exec Jimmy Henchmen, has confessed to being a part of 2Pac’s ambush in the lobby of Quad Studios on November 7, 1994. He says Henchman paid him $2,500 for the robbery attempt which led to a shooting.

Initial reports stated that two men dressed in army fatigues robbed Pac at gunpoint for his jewelry. On the song “Against All Odds”, Pac accused Henchmen of setting him up.

Due to statute of limitations, Issac will not be prosecuted for any crime. He’s currently serving a life sentence and also admits to currently possessing Pac’s jewelery. Meanwhile, Henchmen is currently on the lam from Federal agents.

Backstory:

Jimmy Henchman -

In 1994, Henchman was a free man, working his way up the music industry. Living in Brooklyn, he was managing Little Shawn, a young rapper signed to Andre Harrell’s Uptown Records, and met Tupac through his cohort, another notorious figure, Jacques “Haitian Jack” Agnant. Tupac was in New York filming Above the Rim, in which he portrayed a gangster named Birdie—a character many believed he modeled after Agnant, with whom he’d developed a fast friendship.

Jaques Agnant "Haitian Jack"

Agnant introduced ’Pac to Henchman and another Brooklyn heavy, Walter “King Tut” Johnson. In his time in New York, though, ’Pac had also been spending a lot of time with his friend Biggie Smalls, his Junior M.A.F.I.A crew and Sean “Puffy” Combs’s Bad Boy Entertainment. Biggie warned him about the new company he was keeping—a warning ’Pac shrugged off. Tupac’s friendship with Agnant came to an abrupt end after the two men were arrested and charged with s3xually a.ssaulting 19-year-old Ayanna Jackson in a Manhattan hotel room in November 1993. The cases were tried separately, and in November 1994, ’Pac spoke about Agnant to the Daily News’ A.J. Benza, and not in flattering terms. The incident at Quad Studios came as punishment. “A message was being sent to him not to name-drop. Henchman said the same himself. In a 2005 interview with Vibe magazine, he recalled a conversation he had had with ’Pac. “Nobody came to rob you,” Henchman said he told the rapper. “They came to discipline you. That’s what happened.”

Prelude To The Shooting -

Before he got to Quad Studios, in Times Square, ’Pac was Uptown, recording a track for mixtape DJ Ron G’s latest effort. Ron, in recalling that night, says ’Pac, whom he was meeting for the first time at the session, seemed perturbed by a series of pages he was receiving. “He kept getting phone calls, pages,” Ron remembers. “It kept throwing him off, here and there.” But ’Pac finished his rhyme, which would later resurface as “Deadly Combination,” featuring Big L. “Follow me,” the lyrics begin. “Tell me if you feel me/I think n*ggas is trying to k!ll me.” Unbeknownst to Ron G, the pages were coming from Henchman, who was recruiting ’Pac to rhyme on a song Little Shawn was recording at Quad that night with Uptown’s in-house production team, the Trackmasters. As ’Pac explained to Vibe magazine’s Kevin Powell in 1995, Henchman (who was referred to as “Booker” in the article) was to pay him $7,000 for the guest verse. ’Pac needed the money because his shows were getting cancelled because of the r*pe trial, and his record royalties were going toward lawyer fees. “He felt uncomfortable before he left,” Ron G says, but he went to Quad anyway, accompanied by his frequent collaborator Randy “Stretch” Walker and two other friends.

The Shooting -

Upon entering the building, ’Pac spotted Junior M.A.F.I.A’s Lil’ Cease waving from a balcony at the studio. Cease yelled down that Big was upstairs. This settled his nerves, ’Pac said. Before he made it to the elevator, though, ’Pac also saw three men who, suspiciously, he thought, didn’t look up at him. One was reading a newspaper; two were dressed in military fatigues, a sign he took to mean they were from Brooklyn. Biggie’s security, he guessed. As he pressed for the elevator, the two men in fatigues—one of whom, if his confession is to be believed, was Dexter Isaac—came up from behind with guns drawn, told everyone to lie down and demanded that ’Pac turn over his jewelry. ’Pac told Vibe that he was surprised when the men didn’t go after Walker, who was physically the largest man in his party. (It’s widely a.ssumed that ’Pac was referring to Walker on 1996’s “Ambitionz Az a Ridah” when he rhymed about being set up: “Had bi-ch-ass n*ggas on my team/So, indeed, they wet me up.” In 1995, a year to the day after the robbery, Walker was shot and k!lled in Queens.) ’Pac refused to comply with the orders, and shooting began. Five bullets hit him, and he was beaten and stomped once he was on the floor. After his a.ssailants had relieved him of his jewelry and fled, though, he rose to his feet and got into the elevator. Bleeding and dazed, he arrived up at the studio, where he discovered a large group of men, including Biggie, Puffy, Shawn and Henchman. They seemed stunned to see him, he told Vibe, which made him think that they’d expected him to die. He asked someone to roll him a blunt and called his girlfriend and asked that she call his mother to tell her about the attack.

The Shooting Aftermath -

Police soon arrived. Contrary to reports, the officers were not the same ones who’d arrested ’Pac after Jackson’s r*pe. ’Pac was taken to Bellevue Hospital, where his wounds were determined not to be life-threatening. Fearing for his life, because the Nation of Islam guards a.ssigned to watch him were not carrying weapons, he checked himself out of the hospital and went to recuperate in the apartment of his old friend, actress Jasmine Guy. Days later, still heavily bandaged, ’Pac rolled into a Manhattan courtroom, in a wheelchair, to hear the verdict in his s3xual-assault case. He was acquitted on multiple sodomy charges but was found guilty on several counts of s3xual abuse. In February 1995, he received a sentence of 18 months to four and a half years in prison.
Agnant was able to plead down to two misdemeanor charges and avoided jail time.
On the ominous “Against All Odds,” the final song on his posthumously released last album, The Don k!lluminati: The 7 Day Theory, he delivered a last-will-and-testament type of overture: “Promise the payback, Jimmy Henchman, in due time/I know you bi-ch n*ggas is listenin’, the world is mine/Set me up, wet me up, n*ggas stuck me up/Heard the guns bust, but you tricks never shut me up.”



Henchman's Statement Sparking Issac's Full Confession

“If the government is relying on informants like Winston “Winnie” Harris, a convicted drug dealer and Jamaican deportee, who came to me and motioned via hand signal that he was forced to wear a wire and begged me to skip town, or Dexter Isaac who is serving life in prison plus 30 years, then I’m sure I will not be offered a fair trial. Where’s the real proof that I have committed these crimes? I just want my fair trial and to not be railroaded as they so eagerly want to do.

Dexter Issac's Full Confession

"My name is Dexter Isaac. On Monday, May 23, 2011, James Rosemond released a statement in which he named myself and another individual, a Mr. Winston Harris (who I do not know), as government informants. I would like to clear the record on that statement: I have never been a rat for anybody and I do not have any deals nor was I made any promises by any government agency for information on Mr. Rosemond.
Mr. Rosemond has crucified good reporters like Chuck Philips, at the LA Times, and Alison Gendar, at the Daily News, for telling the truth about him and his activities. He claims they had no proof that he was a rat for the government, which is an outright lie, because Mr. Rosemond, you signed a proffer agreement with the U.S. Attorney's office in New York on 10-20-1998. Mr. Rosemond, I have copies of your presentence report from North Carolina dated 1-13-1997 and other documents about you working with the government sending people you befriended to prison so you can maintain your own freedom. I have met with individuals on whom Mr. Rosemond has told.

Jimmy, I say to you: I have kept your secrets for years. You have never been arrested because of me, or anyone of our friends because of me. How dare you call me an informant! I have stayed silent in prison for the past 13 years, doing a life sentence like a real soldier should, when you and everybody have turned your backs on me. I have never gotten any help nor asked for any help from you or anyone since being locked up.

As a matter of fact, when I was first notified a couple years ago that the feds and Chuck Philips were investigating you, I wrote you and sent you everything they sent me. I kept it real with you because that's what real G's do. Anyway, that was before I found out that you were, in fact, already a turncoat rat for the government. Mr. Rosemond, if I was an informant like you, I would've been home years ago with my family, not doing life in prison.
Now I would like to clear up a few things, because the statute of limitations is over, and no one can be charged, and I'm just plain tired of listening to your lies.
In 1994, James Rosemond hired me to rob 2Pac Shakur at the Quad Studio. He gave me $2,500, plus all the jewelry I took, except for one ring, which he wanted for himself. It was the biggest of the two diamond rings that we took. He said he wanted to put the stone in a new setting for his girlfriend at the time, Cynthia Ried. I still have as proof the chain that we took that night in the robbery.
Now I'm not going to talk about my friend Biggie's death or 2Pac's death, but I would like to give their mothers some closure. It's about time that some one did, and I will do so at a different time. Jimmy, you and Puffy like to come off all innocent-like, but as the saying goes: You can fool some of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time.
Mr. Rosemond, I ask you: Are you going to flip on Puffy when the feds get you? To save yourself like you have done in the past? Because that's what a rat does. So in closing, we shall see who the rat is, in the near future. If anyone has any questions regarding these statement or just want to be a friend to a real Soldier f!ghting for his freedom in prison feel free to write me at:
Dexter Isaac - #49733-053
MDC Brooklyn
PO Box 329002
Brooklyn, NY 11232"

*AllHipHop also mentions that Isaac "has long been suspected of being involved in the Quad shooting of Tupac Shakur, along with an a.ssociate name Spencer "Scooter" Bowens, who is also serving a life sentence and another man named George Roland Campbell."

Sources -

[pic - click to view]

 http://www.xxlmag.com/fea .. pt-2011-issue/

[pic - click to view]

 http://blogs.laweekly.com .. xter_isaac.php

[pic - click to view]

 http://www.xxlmag.com/new .. est-xxclusive/

84 comments for "1994 Pac Shooting Full Info (Complete Available)"

 05-16-2012, 01:46 PM         #2
3rdcoasta  OP
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2pac's Vibe Interview On The Shooting
Can you take us back to that night at Quad Recording Studios in Times Square?The night of the shooting? Sure. Ron G. is a DJ out here in New York. He's, like, "Pac, I want you to come to my house and lay this rap down for my tapes." I said, "All right, I'll come for free." So I went to his house-me, Stretch, and a couple other homeboys. After I laid the song, I got a page from this guy Booker, telling me he wanted me to rap on Little Shawn's record. Now, this guy I was going to charge, because I could see that they was just using me, so I said, "All right, you give me seven G's and I'll do the song." He said, "I've got the money. Come." I stopped off to get some weed, and he paged me again. "Where you at? Why you ain't coming?" I'm, like, "I'm coming, man, hold on."
Did you know this guy?
I met him through some rough characters I knew. He was trying to get legitimate and all that, so I thought I was doing him a favor. But when I called him back for directions, he was, like, "I don't have the money." I said, "If you don't have the money, I'm not coming." He hung up the phone, then called me back: "I'm going to call [Uptown Entertainment CEO] Andre Harrell and make sure you get the money, but I'm going to give you the money out of my pocket." So I said, "All right, I'm on my way." As we're walking up to the building, somebody screamed from up the top of the studio. It was Little Caesar, Biggie's [the Notorious B.I.G.] sideman. That's my homeboy. As soon as I saw him, all my concerns about the situation were relaxed.
So you're saying that going into it.
I felt nervous because this guy knew somebody I had major beef with. I didn't want to tell the police, but I can tell the world. Nigel had introduced me to Booker. Everybody knew I was short on money. All my shows were getting canceled. All my money from my records was going to lawyers; all the movie money was going to my family. So I was doing this type of stuff, rapping for guys and getting paid.
Who's this guy Nigel?
I was kicking it with him the whole time I was in New York doing Above the Rim. He came to me. He said, "I'm going to look after you. You don't need to get in no more trouble."
Doesn't Nigel also go by the name of Trevor?
Right. There's a real Trevor, but Nigel took on both aliases,you understand? So that's who I was kicking with-I got close to them. I used to dress in baggies and sneakers. They took me shopping; that's when I bought my Rolex and all my jewels. They made me mature. They introduced me to all these gangsters in Brooklyn. I met Nigel's family,went to his kid's birthday party-I trusted him, you know what I'm saying? I even tried to get Nigel in the movie, but he didn't want to be on film.That bothered me. I don't know any ni**a that didn't want to be in the movies.
Can we come back to the shooting? Who was with you that night?
I was with my homeboy Stretch, his man Fred, and my sister's boyfriend, Zayd. Not a bodyguard I don't have a bodyguard. We get to the studio, and there's a dude outside in army fatigues with his hat low on his face. When we walked to the door, he didn't look up. I've never seen a black man not acknowledge me one way or the other, either with jealousy or respect. But this guy just looked to see who I was and turned his face down. It didn't click because I had just finished smoking chronic. I'm not thinking something will happen to me in the lobby. While we're waiting to get buzzed in, I saw a dude sitting at a table reading a newspaper. He didn't look up either.
These are both black men?
Black men in their thirties. So first I'm, like, These dudes must be security for Biggie, because I could tell they were from Brooklyn from their army fatigues. But then I said, Wait a minute. Even Biggie's homeboys love me, why don't they look up? I pressed the elevator button, turned around, and that's when the dudes came out with the guns-two identical 9 mms. "Don't nobody move. Everybody on the floor. You know what time it is. Run your sh*t." I was, like, What should I do? I'm thinking Stretch is going to f!ght; he was towering over those ni**as. From what I know about the criminal element, if ni**as come to rob you, they always hit the big ni**a first. But they didn't touch Stretch; they came straight to me. Everybody dropped to the floor like potatoes, but I just froze up. It wasn't like I was being brave or nothing; I just could not get on the floor. They started grabbing at me to see if I was strapped. They said, "Take off your jewels," and I wouldn't take them off. The light-skinned dude, the one that was standing outside, was on me. Stretch was on the floor, and the dude with the newspaper was holding the gun on him. He was telling the light-skin dude, "Shoot that mf*cker! f*ck it!" Then I got scared, because the dude had the gun to my stomach. All I could think about was p!ss bags and sh*t bags. I drew my arm around him to move the gun to my side. He shot and the gun twisted and that's when I got hit the first time. I felt it in my leg; I didn't know I got shot in my balls. I dropped to the floor. Everything in my mind said, Pac, pretend you're dead. It didn't matter. They started kicking me, hitting me. I never said, "Don't shoot!" I was quiet as hell. They were snatching my sh*t off me while I was laying on the floor. I had my eyes closed, but I was shaking, because the situation had me shaking. And then I felt something on the back of my head, something real strong. I thought they stomped me or pistol-whipped me and they were stomping my head against the concrete. I saw white, just white. I didn't hear nothing, I didn't feel nothing, and I said, I'm unconscious. But I was conscious. And then I felt it again, and I could hear things now and I could see things and they were bringing me back to consciousness. Then they did it again, and I couldn't hear nothing. And I couldn't see nothing; it was just all white. And then they hit me again, and I could hear things and I could see things and I knew I was conscious again.
Ever hear them say their names?
No. But they knew me, or else they would never check for my gun. It was like they were mad at me. I felt them kicking me and stomping me; they didn't hit nobody else. It was, like, "Oh, mf*cker, ooh, aah"-they were kicking hard. So I'm going unconscious, and I'm not feeling no blood on my head or nothing. The only thing I felt was my stomach hurting real bad. My sister's boyfriend turned me over and said, "Yo, are you all right?" I was, like, "Yes, I'm hit, I'm hit." And Fred is saying he's hit, but that was the bullet that went through my leg. So I stood up and I went to the door and-the sh*t that f*cked me up-as soon as I got to the door, I saw a police car sitting there. I was, like,Uh-oh, the police are coming, and I didn't even go upstairs yet." So we jumped in the elevator and went upstairs. I'm limping and everything, but I don't feel nothing. It's numb. When we got upstairs, I looked around, and it scared the sh*t out of me.



Why?
Because Andre Harrell was there, Puffy [Bad Boy Entertainment CEO Sean "Puffy" Combs] was there, Biggie... there was about 40 ni**as there. All of them had jewels on. More jewels than me. I saw Booker, and he had this look on his face like he was surprised to see me. Why? I had just beeped the buzzer and said I was coming upstairs. Little Shawn bust out crying. I went, Why is Little Shawn crying, and I got shot? He was crying uncontrollably, like, "Oh my God, Pac, you've got to sit down!" I was feeling weird, like, Why do they want to make me sit down?
Because five bullets had passed through your body.
I didn't know I was shot in the head yet. I didn't feel nothing. I opened my pants, and I could see the gunpowder and the hole in my Karl Kani drawers. I didn't want to pull them down to see if my d!ck was still there. I just saw a hole and went, "Oh sh*t. Roll me some weed." I called my girlfriend and I was, like, "Yo, I just got shot. Call my mother and tell her." Nobody approached me. I noticed that nobody would look at me. Andre Harrell wouldn't look at me. I had been going to dinner with him the last few days. He had invited me to the set of New York Undercover, telling me he was going to get me a job. Puffy was standing back too. I knew Puffy. He knew how much stuff I had done for Biggie before he came out.
People did see blood on you?
They started telling me, "Your head! Your head is bleeding." But I thought it was just a pistol-whip. Then the ambulance came, and the police. First cop I looked up to see was the cop that took the stand against me in the r*pe charge. He had a half smile on his face, and he could see them looking at my balls. He said, "What's up, Tupac? How's it hanging?"
When I got to Bellevue Hospital, the doctor was going, "Oh my God!" I was, like, "What? What?" And I was hearing him tell other doctors, "Look at this. This is gunpowder right here." He was talking about my head: "This is the entry wound. This is the exit wound." And when he did that, I could actually feel the holes. I said, "Oh my God. I could feel that." It was the spots that I was blacking out on. And that's when I said, "Oh sh*t. They shot me in my head." They said, "You don't know how lucky you are. You got shot five times." It was, like, weird. I did not want to believe it. I could only remember that first shot, then everything went blank.
At any point did you think you were going to die?
No. I swear to God. Not to sound creepy or nothing-I felt God cared for me from the first time the ni**as pulled the gun out. The only thing that hurt me was that Stretch and them all fell to the floor. The bullets didn't hurt. Nothing hurt until I was recovering. I couldn't walk, I couldn't get up, and my hand was f*cked up. I was looking on the news and it was lying about me.
Tell me about some of the coverage that bothered you.
The No. 1 thing that bothered me was that dude that wrote that sh*t that said I pretended to do it. That I had set it up, it was an act. When I read that, I just started crying like a baby, like a b*tch. I could not believe it. It just tore me apart. And then the news was trying to say I had a gun and I had weed on me. Instead of saying I was a victim, they were making it like I did it.
What about all the jokes saying you had lost one of your testicles?
That didn't really bother me, because I was, like, sh*t, I'm going to get the last laugh. Because I've got bigger nuts than all these ni**as. My doctors are, like, "You can have babies." They told me that the first night, after I got exploratory surgery: "Nothing's wrong. It went through the skin and out the skin." Same thing with my head. Through my skin and out the skin.
Have you had a lot of pain since then?
Yes, I have headaches. I wake up screaming. I've been having nightmares, thinking they're still shooting me. All I see is ni**as pulling guns, and I hear the dude saying, "Shoot that motherf*cker!" Then I'll wake up sweaty as hell and I'll be, like, Damn, I have a headache. The psychiatrist at Bellevue said that's post-traumatic stress.
Why did you leave Bellevue Hospital?
I left Bellevue the next night. They were helping me, but I felt like a science project. They kept coming in, looking at my d!ck and sh*t, and this was not a cool position to be in. I knew my life was in danger. The Nation of Islam was there, but they didn't have guns. I knew what type of ni**as I was dealing with.
So I left Bellevue and went to Metropolitan. They gave me a phone and said, "You're safe here. Nobody knows you're here." But the phone would ring and someone would say, "You ain't dead yet?" I was, like, Damn! Those motherf*ckers don't have no mercy. So I checked myself out, and my family took me to a safe spot, somebody who really cared about me in New York City.
 05-16-2012, 01:47 PM         #3
3rdcoasta  OP
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Against All Oddz Lyrics
Twenty-one gun salute, dressed in fatigue, black jeans and boots
Disappeared in the crowd, all you seen was troops
This little n*gga named Nas thinks he live like me
Talkin bout he left the hospital took five like me
You living fantasies, n*gga I reject your deposit
We shook Dre punk a.ss, now we out of the closet
Mobb Deep wonder why n*gga blowed them out
Next time grown folks talk, n*gga close your mouth
Peep me, I take this war sh-t deeply
Done seen too many real players fall to let these bi-ch n*ggas beat me
Puffy lets be honest you a punk or you will see me with gloves
Remember that sh-t you said to Vibe about me bein a thug
You can tell the people you roll with whatever you want
But you and I know what's going on
Payback, I knew you bi-ch n*ggas from way back
Witness me strapped with Macs, knew I wouldn't play that
All you old rappers trying to advance
It's all over now, take it like a man
n*ggas lookin like Larry Holmes, flabby and sick
Tryin to player hate on my sh-t, you eat a fat d!ck
Let it be known this is how you made me
Lovin how I got you n*ggas crazy

Against all odds
Hopin my thug motherfu-kers know
This be the realest sh-t I ever wrote
Against all odds, up in the studio, gettin blowed
To the truest sh-t I ever spoke, against all odds
Hopin my true motherfu-kers know
This be the realest sh-t I ever wrote

I heard he was light skinned, stocky with a Haitian accent
Jewelery, fast cars and he's known for flashing (What's his name???)
Listen while I take you back (n*gga SAY HIS NAME!) and lace this rap
A real live tale about a snitch named Haitian Jack
Knew he was workin for the feds, same crime, different trials
n*gga, picture what he said, and did I mention
Promised a payback, Jimmy Henchman, in due time
I know you bi-ch n*ggas is listenin, The World Is Mine
Set me up, wet me up, n*ggas stuck me up
Heard the guns bust but you tricks never shut me up
Touch one of mine on everything I own
I'll destroy everything you touch, play the game n*gga
All out warfare, eye for eye
Last words to a bi-ch n*gga, "WHY YOU LIE?!?"
Now you gotta watch your back, now watch your front
Here we come, gunshots too Tutt, now you stuck
fu-k the rap game, n*gga this M-O-B
So believe me we enemies, I go against all odds

I'm hopin my true motherfu-kers know
This be the realest sh-t I ever wrote
Against all odds, up in the studio, gettin blowed
To the truest sh-t I ever spoke
I'm hopin my true motherfu-kers know
This be the realest sh-t I ever wrote
Against all odds

Puffy gettin robbed like a bi-ch, to hide the fact
he did some sh-t he shouldn't have did, so we ride em for that
And that n*gga that was down for me, restin dead
Switch sides, guess his new friends wanted him dead
Probably be murdered for the sh-t that I said
I bring the real, be a legend, breathin the dead
Lord listen to me
God don't like ugly, It Was Written
(ey yo Nas) Nas, your whole damn style is bitten
You heard my melody, read about my life in the papers
All my run-ins with authorities, felonious capers
Now you wanna live my life, so what's the answer Nas?
n*ggas that don't rhyme right, you've seen too many movies
Load em up against the wall, close his eyes
Since you lie you die, GOODBYE
Let the real live n*ggas hear the truth from me
What would you do if you was me n*gga?

Puffy's Reaction To Shooting In Vibe Magazine
Basically, the whole thing must have been a dream. We were shooting Biggie’s “Warning” video, and I see one of the Bad Boy staff members on his way to Biggie’s session. I knew that Biggie had a session with Junior Mafia, but I didn’t know it was right around the corner. So I’m going to check B.I.G., you know what I’m saying?

When I get off the elevator at Quad, you have to stop in a reception area, and there’s this Little Shawn session with Andre. So I stopped to say “What’s up?” to them. I’m about to go up to Biggie’s session when Pac comes out the elevator and he’s shot up. He had some blood coming out of his head, but there wasn’t a lot of blood. He was holding his groin area and limping a little bit.

Nobody turned their backs on him; n*ggas was all up on him. Immediately, Andre was, like, “Oh my God, call the ambulance.” Tupac wanted to go to the phone, so me and my man Groovy Lou was by his side, trying to hold him up, getting him to calm down. He was telling Groovy Lou to roll him a blunt. He definitely brought the theatrics to it.

He got a lot of people in a lot of bullsh-t with that interview. The way it was written, it was open-ended, like me and B.I.G. and Andre had something to do with it. I would never, ever purposely try to hurt no next man. That man had his own beefs with n*ggas. I ain’t never had no beef with that man.

I hope that his Thug Life sh-t is really over. But on the real, if you gonna be a motherfu-kin’ thug, you gots to live and die a thug, you know what I’m sayin’? There ain’t no jumpin’ in and out of thugism. If that’s what you choose to do, you gots to go out like that. I ain’t no thug. Only thugs I know is dead or in jail. Or about to be.

Even still, I ain’t got no beef. I pray for him, and it’s all good. I’m writing him a letter. I want to hear what he’s thinking face-to-face. Out of everybody, I’m the easiest to forgive. I’ve been there where the whole press is against you, the world ain’t understanding you, n*ggas don’t know what really went on. And you get confused. That’s the only thing I can see is confusion.

Vibe Magazine, September 1996. Puffy and Biggie Break Their Silence On Tupac, death Row, And All The East-West Friction. A Tale of Bad Boys and Bad Men.

Now, we can settle this like we got some class, or we can get into some gangster sh-t. -Max Julien as Goldie in The Mack

It’s hard to believe that someone who has seen so much could have such young eyes. But the eyes of Sean “Puffy” Combs, bright, brown, and alert, reflect the stubborn innocence of childhood. His voice, however, tells another story. Sitting inside the control room of Daddy’s House Studios in Midtown Manhattan, dressed in an Orlando Magic jersey and linen slacks, Puffy speaks in low, measured tones, almost whispering.

“I’m hurt a little bit spiritually by all the negativity, by this whole death Row-Bad Boy sh-t,” says Puffy, president of Bad Boy Entertainment, one of the most powerful creative forces in black music today. And these days, one of the most tormented. “I’m hurt that out of all my accomplishments, it’s like I’m always getting my most fame from negative drama. It’s not like the young man that was in the industry for six years, won the ASCAP Songwriter of the Year, and every record he put out went at least gold…. All that gets overshadowed. How it got to this point, I really don’t know. I’m still trying to figure it out.”

So is everyone else. What’s clear is that a series of incidents-Tupac Shakur catching bullets at a New York studio in November ‘94, a close friend of death Row CEO Suge Knight being k!lled at an Atlanta party in September ‘95, the Notorious B.I.G. and Tupac facing off after the Soul Train Music Awards in L.A. this past March-have led to much finger-pointing and confusion. People with little or no connection to death Row or Bad Boy are choosing up sides. From the Atlantic to the Pacific, hip hop heads are proclaiming their “California Love” or exclaiming that the “the East is in the house” with the loyalty of newly initiated gang members. As Dr. Dre put it, “Pretty soon, n*ggaz from the East Coast ain’t gonna be able to come out here and be safe. And vice versa.”

Meanwhile, the two camps that have the power to put an end to it all have yet to work out their differences. Moreover, Suge Knight’s death Row camp, while publicly claiming there is no beef, has continued to aggravate the situation: first, by making snide public comments about the Bad Boy family, and second, by releasing product that makes the old Dre-vs.-Eazy conflict look tame. The intro to the video for the Tupac/Snoop Doggy Dogg song “2 of Americaz Most Wanted” features two characters named Pig and Buff who are accused of setting up Tupac and are then confronted in their office. And the now infamous B-side, “Hit ‘Em Up,” finds Tupac, in a fit of rage, telling Biggie, “I fu-ked your bi-ch, you fat motherfu-ker,” and then threatening to wipe out all of Bad Boy’s staff and affiliates.

While the records fly off the shelves and the streets get hotter and hotter, Puffy and Big have remained largely silent. Both say they have been reluctant to discuss the drama in any detail because they feel the media and the public have blown it out of proportion. But with knuckleheads questioning why they haven’t brought the ruckus and do-gooders questioning why they haven’t made peace, they’ve decided to end their verbal hiatus.

Why would I set a n*gga up to get shot?” says Puffy. “If I’ma set a n*gga up, which I would never do, I ain’t gonna be in the country. I’ma be in Bolivia somewhere.” Once again, Puffy is answering accusations that he had something to do with Shakur’s shooting at New York’s Quad Recording Studio, the event that sowed the seeds of Tupac’s beef with the East.
In April 1995, Tupac told VIBE that moments after he was ambushed and shot in the building’s lobby, he took the elevator up to the studio, where he saw about 40 people, including Biggie and Puffy. “Nobody approached me. I noticed that nobody would look at me,” said Tupac, suggesting that the people in the room knew he was going to be shot. In “Hit ‘Em Up,” Tupac does more than suggest, rapping, “Who shot me? But ya punks didn’t finish / Now you’re about to feel the wrath of a menace.”

But Puffy says Tupac’s barking up the wrong tree: “He ain’t mad at the n*ggas that shot him; he knows where they’re at. He knows who shot him. If you ask him, he knows, and everybody in the street knows, and he’s not stepping to them, because he knows that he’s not gonna get away with that sh-t. To me, that’s some real sucker sh-t. Be mad at everybody, man; don’t be using n*ggas as scapegoats. We know that he’s a nice guy from New York. All sh-t aside, Tupac is a nice, good-hearted guy.”

Taking a break from recording a new joint for his upcoming album, Life After death, Big sinks into the studio’s sofa in a blue Sergio Tacchini running suit that swishes with his every movement. He is visibly bothered by the lingering accusations. “I’m still thinking this n*gga’s my man,” says Big, who first met Tupac in 1993 during the shooting of John Singleton’s Poetic Justice. “This sh-t’s just got to be talk, that’s all I kept saying to myself. I can’t believe he would think that I would sh-t on him like that.”

He recalls that on the movie set, Tupac kept playing Big’s first single, “Party and Bullsh-t.” Flattered, he met Tupac at his home in L.A., where the two hung out, puffed lah, and chilled. “I always thought it to be like a Gemini thing,” he says. “We just clicked off the top and were cool ever since.” Despite all the talk, Big claims he remained loyal to his partner in rhyme through thick and thin. “Honestly, I didn’t have no problem with the n*gga,” Big says. “There’s sh-t that muthafu-kas don’t know. I saw the situations and how sh-t was going, and I tried to school the n*gga. I was there when he bought his first Rolex, but I wasn’t in the position to be rolling like that. I think Tupac felt more comfortable with the dudes he was hanging with because they had just as much money as him.

“He can’t front on me,” says Big. “As much as he may come off as some Biggie hater, he knows. He knows when all that sh-t was going down, I was schooling a n*gga to certain things, me and [Live Squad rapper] Stretch-God bless the grave. But he chose to do the things he wanted to do. There wasn’t nothing I could do, but it wasn’t like he wasn’t my man.”

While Tupac was taking shots at Biggie-claiming he’d bit his “player” style and sound-Suge was cooking up his own beef with Bad Boy. At the Source Awards in August 1995, Suge made the now legendary announcement, “If you don’t want the owner of your label on your album or in your video or on your tour, come sign with death Row.” Obviously directed at Puffy’s high-profile role in his artists’ careers, the remark came as a shock. “I couldn’t believe what he said,” Puffy recalls. “I thought we was boys.” All the same, when it came time for Puffy to present an award, he said a few words about East-West unity and made a point of hugging the recipient, death Row artist Snoop Doggy Dogg.

Nonetheless, Suge’s words spread like flu germs, reigniting ancient East-West hostilities. It was in this increasingly tense atmosphere that Big and the Junior M.A.F.I.A. clique reached Atlanta for Jermaine Dupri’s birthday party last September. During the after-party at a club called Platinum House, Suge Knight’s close friend Jake Robles was shot. He died at the hospital a week later. Published reports said that some witnesses claimed a member of Puffy’s entourage was responsible.

At the mention of the incident, Puffy sucks his teeth in frustration. “Here’s what happened,” he says. “I went to Atlanta with my son. At that time, there wasn’t really no drama. I didn’t even have bodyguards, so that’s a lie that I did. I left the club, and I’m waiting for my limo, talking to girls. I don’t see [Suge] go into the club; we don’t make any contact or nothing like that. He gets into a beef in the club with some n*ggas. I knew the majority of the club, but I don’t know who he got into the beef with, what it was over, or nothing like that. All I heard is that he took beef at the bar. I see people coming out. I see a lot of people that I know, I see him, and I see everybody yelling and screaming and sh-t. I get out the limo and I go to him, like, `What’s up, you all right?’ I’m trying to see if I can help. That’s my muthafu-kin’ problem,” Puffy says, pounding his fist into his palm in frustration. “I’m always trying to see if I can help somebody.

“Anyway, I get out facing him, and I’m, like, `What’s going on, what’s the problem?’ Then I hear shots ringing out, and we turn around and someone’s standing right behind me. His man-God bless the dead-gets shot, and he’s on the floor. My back was turned; I could’ve got shot, and he could’ve got shot. But right then he was, like, `I think you had something to do with this.’ I’m, like, `What are you talking about? I was standing right here with you!’ I really felt sorry for him, in the sense that if he felt that way, he was showing me his insecurity.”
 05-16-2012, 01:48 PM         #4
3rdcoasta  OP
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After the Atlanta shooting, people on both coasts began speculating. Would there be retribution? All-out war? According to a New York Times Magazine cover story, Puffy sent Louis Farrakhan’s son, Mustafa, to talk with Suge. Puffy says he did not send Mustafa but did tell him, “If there’s anything you can do to put an end to this bullsh-t, I’m with it.” The Times reported that Suge refused to meet with Mustafa. Suge has since declined to speak about his friend’s murder.
Less than two weeks later, when it came time for the “How Can I Be Down?” rap conference in Miami, the heat was on. Suge, who has never concealed his past affiliations with L.A.’s notorious Bloods, was rumored to be coming with an army. Puffy was said to be bringing a massive of New York drug lords and thugs. When the conference came and Puffy did not attend, Billboard reported that it was due to threats from death Row.

On December 16, 1995, it became apparent that the trouble was spilling into the streets. In Red Hook, Brooklyn, shots were fired at the trailer where death Row artists Tha Dogg Pound were making a video for “New York, New York”-which features Godzilla-size West Coasters stomping on the Big Apple. No one was hurt, but the message was clear. Then came “L.A., L.A.,” an answer record from New York MCs Tragedy, Capone, Noreaga, and Mobb Deep. That video featured stand-ins for Tha Dogg Pound’s Daz and Kurupt being kidnapped, tortured, and tossed off the 59th Street Bridge.

By this time, the rumor mill had kicked into overdrive. The latest story was that Tupac was boning Biggie’s wife, Faith Evans, and Suge was getting with Puffy’s ex, Misa Hylton. death Row allegedly printed up a magazine ad featuring Misa and Suge holding Puffy’s two-year-old son, with a caption reading “The East Coast can’t even take care of their own.” The ad-which was discussed on New York’s Hot 97 by resident gossip Wendy Williams-never ran anywhere, but reps were tarnished nonetheless. death Row now denies that such an ad ever existed. Puffy says he didn’t know about any ad. Misa says, “I don’t do interviews.”

Meanwhile, Tupac kept rumors about himself and Faith alive with vague comments in interviews like “You know I don’t kiss and tell.” But in “Hit ‘Em Up,” released this May, he does just that, telling Biggie, “You claim to be a player, but I fu-ked your wife.” (Faith, for her part, denies ever sleeping with Tupac.)

When talk turns to his estranged wife, Biggie shrugs his shoulders and pulls on a blunt. “If the muthafu-ka really did fu-k Fay, that’s foul how he’s just blowin’ her like that,” he says. “Never once did he say that Fay did some foul sh-t to him. If honey was to give you the pus-y, why would you disrespect her like that? If you had beef with me, and you’re, like, `Boom, I’ma fu-k his wife,’ would you be so harsh on her? Like you got beef with her? That sh-t doesn’t make sense. That’s why I don’t believe it.”

What was still mostly talk and propaganda took a turn for the ugly at the Soul Train Awards this past March. When Biggie accepted his award and bigged-up Brooklyn, the crowd hissed. But the real drama came after the show, when Tupac and Biggie came face-to-face for the first time since Pac’s shooting more than two years before. “That was the first time I really looked into his face,” says Big. “I looked into his eyes and I was, like, Yo, this n*gga is really buggin’ the fu-k out.”

The following week’s Hollywood Reporter quoted an unnamed source saying that Shakur waved a pistol at Biggie. “Nah, Pac didn’t pull steel on me,” says Big. “He was on some tough sh-t, though. I can’t knock them dudes for the way they go about their biz. They made everything seem so dramatic. I felt the darkness when he rolled up that night. Duke came out the window fatigued out, screaming `West Side! Outlaws!’ I was, like, `That’s Bishop [Tupac’s character in the movie Juice]!’ Whatever he’s doing right now, that’s the role he’s playing. He played that sh-t to a tee. He had his little goons with him, and Suge was with him, and they was, like, `We gonna settle this now.’ “

That’s when Big’s ace, Little Caesar of Junior M.A.F.I.A., stepped up. “The n*gga Ceez-pissy drunk-is up in the joint, like, `fu-k you!’ ” Big recalls. “Ceez is, like, `fu-k you, n*gga! East Coast, muthafu-ka!’ Pac is, like, `We on the West Side now, we gonna handle this sh-t.’ Then his n*ggas start formulating and my n*ggas start formulating-somebody pulled a gun, muthafu-kas start screaming, `He got a gun, he got a gun!’ We’re, like, `We’re in L.A. What the fu-k are we supposed to do, shoot out?’ That’s when I knew it was on.”

But not long after the Soul Train incident, it appeared as if death Row might be starting to chill. At a mid-May East-West “rap summit” in Philadelphia, set up by Dr. Ben Chavis to help defuse the situation, Suge avoided any negative comments about Puffy (who did not attend because he says there was too much hype around the event). “There’s nothing between death Row and Bad Boy, or me and Puffy,” said Knight. “death Row sells volume-so how could Puffy be a threat to me, or Bad Boy be a threat to death Row?” A few weeks later, however, death Row released a song that told a different tale.

When Tupac’s “Hit ‘Em Up”-which mimics the chorus of Junior M.A.F.I.A.’s “Player’s Anthem” (“Grab your Glocks when you see Tupac”)-hit the streets of New York, damn near every jeep, coupe, and walkman was pumping it. No fakin’ jacks here, son; Tupac set it on the East something lovely. He says he put out the song in retaliation for Big’s 1995 “Who Shot Ya,” which he took as a comment on his own shooting. “Even if that song ain’t about me,” he told VIBE, “You should be, like, `I’m not putting it out, ‘cause he might think it’s about him.’ “

“I wrote that muthafu-kin’ song way before Tupac got shot,” says Big, like he’s said it before. “It was supposed to be the intro to that sh-t Keith Murray was doing on Mary J. Blige’s joint. But Puff said it was too hard.” As if the lyrical haymakers thrown at Bad Boy weren’t enough, Pac went the extra mile and pulled Mobb Deep into the mix. “Don’t one of you n*ggas got sickle-cell or something?” he says on the record. “You gonna fu-k around and have a seizure or a heart attack. You’d better back the fu-k up before you get smacked the fu-k up.”

Prodigy of Mobb Deep says he couldn’t believe what he heard. “I was, like, Oh sh-t. Them n*ggas is sh-ttin’ on me. He’s talking about my health. Yo, he doesn’t even know me, to be talking about sh-t like that. I never had any beef with Tupac. I never said his name. So that sh-t just hurt. I’m, like, Yeah, all right, whatever. I just gotta handle that sh-t.” Asked what he means by “handling” it, Prodigy replies, “I don’t know, son. We gonna see that n*gga somewhere and-whatever. I don’t know what it’s gonna be.” In the meantime, the infamous ones plan to include an answer to “Hit ‘Em Up” on the B-side of an upcoming single.

n a recent interview with VIBEonline, Tupac summed up his feelings toward Bad Boy in typically dramatic fashion: “Fear got stronger than love, and n*ggas did things they weren’t supposed to do. They know in their hearts-that’s why they’re in hell now. They can’t sleep. That’s why they’re telling all the reporters and all the people, `Why they doing this? They fu-king up hip hop’ and blah-blah-blah, ‘cause they in hell. They can’t make money, they can’t go anywhere. They can’t look at themselves, ‘cause they know the prodigal son has returned.”

In the face of all this, one might wonder why Biggie hasn’t retaliated physically to Tupac’s threats. After all, he’s the same Bed-Stuy soldier who rapped, “C-4 to your door, no beef no more.” Says Big, “The whole reason I was being cool from Day One was because of that n*gga Puff. ‘Cause Puff don’t get down like that.”

So what about a response on record? “He got the streets riled up because he got a little song dissing me,” Big replies, “but how would I look dissing him back? My n*ggas is, like, `fu-k dat n*gga, that n*gga’s so much on your d!ck, it don’t even make no sense to say anything.”

Given death Row’s intimidating reputation, does Puffy believe that he’s in physical danger? “I never knew of my life being in danger,” he says calmly. “I’m not saying that I’m ignorant to the rumors. But if you got a problem and somebody wants to get your a.ss, they don’t talk about it. What it’s been right now is a lot of moviemaking and a lot of entertainment drama. Bad boys move in silence. If somebody wants to get your a.ss, you’re gonna wake up in heaven. There ain’t no record gonna be made about it. It ain’t gonna be no interviews; it’s gonna be straight-up `Oh sh-t, where am I? What are these wings on my back? Your name is Jesus Christ?’ When you’re involved in some real sh-t, it’s gonna be some real sh-t.

“But ain’t no man gonna make me act a way that I don’t want to act. Or make me be something I’m not. I ain’t a gangster, so why y’all gonna tell me to start acting like a gangster? I’m trying to be an intelligent black man. I don’t give a fu-k if n*ggas think that’s corny or not. If anybody comes and touches me, I’m going to defend myself. But I’ma be me-a young n*gga who came up making music, trying to put n*ggas on, handle his business, and make some history.”

The history of hip hop is built on battles. But it used to be that when heads had a problem, they could pull a mike and settle it, using hollow-point rhymes to rub their competitors off the map. Well, things done changed. The era of the gun clapper is upon us, with rappers and record execs alike taking their cue from Scarface. Meanwhile, those on the sidelines seem less concerned with the truth than with fanning the flames-gossiping about death threats and retribution, lying in wait for the first sign of bloodshed.

More than anything, Puffy seems exhausted by the whole ordeal. But after all he’s seen in the past two years, nothing can surprise him-except, maybe, the squashing of this beef. “I’m ready for it to come to a head, however it gotta go down,” he says. “I’m ready for it to be out my life and be over with. I mean that from the bottom of my heart. I just hope it can end quick and in a positive way, because it’s gotten out of hand.”






I know its a long read and I'm sure some of this has been posted. Got it from another forum and thought it was insightful.


I'll be the first to say Ima a Pac fan, but this was the first time I've heard Puffy/BIG side of the story. Got a new respect for both of them boys...looks like they were humble tryin to defuse the situation for the most part.

Damn Pac went through some sh-t! But he could've prevented some of it...cause puffy/big didnt want the beef after all?

Thoughts? Or fu-k you n*gga let this sh-t rest! Lol
 6 years ago '07        #5
Grave 3 heat pts
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Good read.
 05-16-2012, 02:01 PM         #6
HoLLiwood Heyti  OP
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Good read but let this sh*t rest, n*gga pac got his balls shot off on 2 different occasions, this n*gga had to die
 05-16-2012, 03:01 PM         #7
3rdcoasta  OP
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 HoLLiwood Heyti said:
Good read but let this sh*t rest, n*gga pac got his balls shot off on 2 different occasions, this n*gga had to die
true I was trippin on the details cause i can hear them n*ggas sayin that sh*t on both sides.
 6 years ago '08        #8
Future 44 heat pts44
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 HoLLiwood Heyti said:
Good read but let this sh*t rest, n*gga pac got his balls shot off on 2 different occasions, this n*gga had to die
Stfu....
 6 years ago '04        #9
bigjoshi2002 12 heat pts12
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Issac aint do it but maybe he was in on it. Chaz Willimas got Pac Jewels back for him, what chain is Issac talking about? Oh and check out 50's track Many Men.
 6 years ago '07        #10
Root Of Evil 56 heat pts56
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dope read..
 6 years ago '11        #11
KeithClark 10 heat pts10
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Holy fu*k I read that entire article realest sh*t:

That didn't really bother me, because I was, like, sh*t, I'm going to get the last laugh. Because I've got bigger nuts than all these ni**as.

- Keith Clark
 05-16-2012, 04:50 PM         #12
Maafa  OP
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"Duke came out the window fatigued out, screaming `West Side! Outlaws!’ I was, like, That’s Bishop"

good read. a lot of this was new news to me, especially the detail of pac's story involving the hospital and all
 6 years ago '11        #13
NewEra21 14 heat pts14
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Is there anything new in this that hasn't been reported in the past 15 years or so?
 6 years ago '09        #14
MakaveliToDon91 11 heat pts11
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 NewEra21 said:
Is there anything new in this that hasn't been reported in the past 15 years or so?
yeah dexter issac claimed he shot Pac in '94, we aint know that. he also said Puffy was involved in the hit, which Pac said in that one song and interview but we aint have anybody else to back him up.
 6 years ago '12        #15
Yano 1 heat pts
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dope read though
 6 years ago '11        #16
NewEra21 14 heat pts14
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 MakaveliToDon91 said:
yeah dexter issac claimed he shot Pac in '94, we aint know that. he also said Puffy was involved in the hit, which Pac said in that one song and interview but we aint have anybody else to back him up.
XXL reported that last year
 05-16-2012, 10:58 PM         #17
RamsGold  OP
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Roll me a blunt he sais after getting blasted
 6 years ago '04        #18
LightsOut 19 heat pts19
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 RamsGold said:
Roll me a blunt he sais after getting blasted
 6 years ago '04        #19
King Capo 8 heat pts
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Good sh*t...

You can tell puff had something to do with PAC death, by how he felt about the whole situation and what he was saying


fu*k S. combs and j. henchman

Rip pac
 6 years ago '06        #20
Xaiv 149 heat pts149
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 MakaveliToDon91 said:
yeah dexter issac claimed he shot Pac in '94, we aint know that. he also said Puffy was involved in the hit, which Pac said in that one song and interview but we aint have anybody else to back him up.
Bbbbbbut bad boy Stans insist puffy knew nothin about....
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