The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…

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 04-25-2012, 08:26 AM         #1
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s7venwords 
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The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…
 

 

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April 24th, 2012 by Dot, under Hip Hop.

..was the title to the email I just received from someone who can only be identified as John Smith or “industryconfessions”. In this lengthy email was a “confession” from a former “decision maker” within the music industry during the 1990′s. In this email they went on to tell a story about a certain meeting that happened back in 1991 that changed the way Rap music was marketed and why it was being marketed and who benefited from such practices. I’m not sure if this story has any truth to it or if it’s some hoax to get an as-hole like me to post it on his website but I have heard this theory before and not just with Rap music. So today I will entertain “Mr. John Smith” and share this story with my fellow Councilmen.- Dot


Hello,
After more than 20 years, I’ve finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I’ve simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren’t ready for.

Between the late 80′s and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.

The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future. Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn’t seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn’t find anyone who had answers for us. A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the “unfamiliar” group collected the agreements from us.

Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn’t the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this.
Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He a.ssured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn’t dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.

A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I’d like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn’t talk or call anyone that night. The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn’t remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention. I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn’t willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free. There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an a.ssembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.

I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a “quiet” life away from the world of entertainment. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet as a resource which wasn’t at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.

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Thank you.


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 Dot Got It » The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…


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Props to MPLSallstar.


Last edited by s7venwords; 04-25-2012 at 08:46 PM..

363 comments for "The Secret Meeting That Changed Rap Music And Destroyed A Generation…"

 6 years ago '11        #2
ImInHerMouth 1 heat pts
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Falls right in line with what Pac was saying about holding rapper's accountable for what they're saying, cause they know what they're doing. Interesting read.
 6 years ago '10        #3
Delbert Mengel 28 heat pts28
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interesting article. not sure i believe it though.
 04-25-2012, 08:47 AM         #4
s7venwords  OP
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 ImInHerMouth said:
Falls right in line with what Pac was saying about holding rapper's accountable for what they're saying, cause they know what they're doing. Interesting read.
It may seem far fetched ( the meeting part ), but if you think about it, there is a pattern. If certain people in the music industry wanted to down size the black population they ( record execs ) did so by pushing stereo types of thugs so the kids who lived a normal life would be intrigued by that and commence to live out the raps, thus getting them caught up in the system and having it affect the rest of their lives.
 6 years ago '11        #5
Retro 83 heat pts83
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Should be an interesting read later. One thing people have to to understand though is that the consumer is still just as much to blame. Had their plan failed you seriously think they'd continue to force it until it worked? It's about making money at the end of the day. We're self destructive due to our vices. Our priorities are all fu*ked up but that's not only rap music's fault...
 04-25-2012, 08:50 AM         #6
s7venwords  OP
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 Retro said:
Should be an interesting read later. One thing people have to to understand though is that the consumer is still just as much to blame. Had their plan failed you seriously think they'd continue to force it until it worked? It's about making money at the end of the day. We're self destructive due to our vices. Our priorities are all fu*ked up but that's not only rap music's fault...
Agree, nobody forced people to buy it. But kids are very impressionable and even some adults.
When it concerns making $ and trying to accomplish something, some will go all out.
 04-25-2012, 08:51 AM         #7
Powerager  OP
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 6 years ago '11        #8
Retro 83 heat pts83
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 s7venwords said:
Agree, nobody forced people to buy it. But kids are very impressionable and even some adults.
When it concerns making $ and trying to accomplish something, some will go all out.
You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to s7venwords again.

And word I get that. What we are subjected to has influence on decision making but it doesn't choose the decision for us. Like I said it's not only rap music's fault, but the media does have something to do with how we live & what we strive for. It's one of the strongest factors in the socialization process...
 6 years ago '11        #9
ImInHerMouth 1 heat pts
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 Retro said:
Should be an interesting read later. One thing people have to to understand though is that the consumer is still just as much to blame. Had their plan failed you seriously think they'd continue to force it until it worked? It's about making money at the end of the day. We're self destructive due to our vices. Our priorities are all fu*ked up but that's not only rap music's fault...
You're right. But yeah, I do believe they would've kept pushing until it worked. Look at how songs on the radio are pushed. With the right backing, they will MAKE you like a song. Literally MAKE you like it. Even when you couldn't stand the sh*t 2 weeks ago. Plus it's alluring, so if this was real, it's not like it wouldn't have worked. I don't think Hip Hop was the only genre that they would've done this to though. Rock was already doing this at one point.
 6 years ago '05        #10
ice wolf 515 heat pts515
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I've read a lot about the prison industrial complex. This is shocking, but I can't say I'm surprised. Prison's should never be a private business. Alex Jones has many articles and plenty of info on . Some of his views are a bit out there, but his facts and research are amazing.

Music Exec's are typically shady, so I'm sure some of them were fully open to promoting crime through hip-hop. I grew up in that era. It's 100% true that after 1991 all conscious hip-hop like Public Enemy, X-Clan, Poor Righteous Teachers etc were no longer promoted. The industry was pushing NWA, Spice-1, Snoop Dogg, Comptons Most Wanted on us. West coast gangsta rap was the only sh!t getting promoted for many years after 1991. I was a fan of it all, but it was pretty obvious that the industry was moving in a darker direction. This article may be bullsh!t, but I personally believe this story. It all adds up to me.

Read this article on Too Short. He discusses how the industry was pushing him to promote negative stereotypes in the 90's. His claims back all of this up:



Too Short Says There Was An Industry-Wide Plot To Shut Down Conscious Hip Hop

Exclusive: Short says Jive Records pushed him to be exclusively nasty and that the major labels plotted to keep positive Rap off the radio airwaves. He also explains the Dangerous Crew's disbanding.


During his recent interview with HipHopDX, the purveyor of punany raps, Too Short, addressed allegations that he had encouraged the s3xual a.ssault of young girls with his recent “Fatherly Advice” video message to young boys.

But also during that discussion, Short Dog delved deeper into why so many may have come to think that Hip Hop’s original mack is nothing more than a perverse individual, due in part to the content of his songs abruptly shifting into strictly s3xually explicit material beginning around the mid-‘90s. Short candidly revealed why after his early ‘90s releases there were no socially-conscious songs on his albums ala “Trying To Come Up” from his just-released 19th studio effort, No Trespassing. The pioneering West Coast artist explained not only how his recording home of 20 years, Jive Records, prevented him from continuing to release songs about poverty, the effects of drug addiction and police brutality that had become the counterbalance to his “Freaky Tales,” but Short also shared his theory that all the major labels conspired to keep conscious Hip Hop off the radio airwaves.

Short concluded his stroll down memory lane by explaining how the ATL led to the demise of his Dangerous Crew, how the Bay Area legend actually helped to set off the South’s commercial dominance in Hip Hop, and why he owes a debt of gratitude to Lil Jon for extending his now 30-year tenure in the Rap game.

HipHopDX: I selected “I Want To Be Free” for the “10 Most Powerful Videos In Hip Hop History” editorial I did for DX a couple months back. I noted in my write-up about the video that you never really resumed your role of reporter of societal ills after “I Want To Be Free,” instead choosing to comprise your content almost entirely of c*cktails. Why did you shift away from doing heavier songs like that, “The Ghetto,” etc.?

Too Short: In the mid-‘90s when death Row Records emerged to be like the hottest – no doubt about it on the West Coast – music around at the time, particularly with the Dr. Dre album, [The Chronic], Snoop Dogg’s debut album, [Doggystyle] and Tha Dogg Pound album, [Dogg Food], at that time I’m getting ready to make the album c*cktails and I moved to Atlanta …. I’m moving to Atlanta and things aren’t in my life, things aren’t the same as in Oakland. I’m leaving Oakland during a very, very, very hostile era, where there’s a major drug war going on between a lot of guys that I’ve known for years and years who are k!lling each other.

I’m rappin’ this pimp image but I’m also – In all of my early albums with Jive [Records], they all had lots of songs that weren’t about s3x, that didn’t have curse words in ‘em, and I would pick subjects like crack cocaine, poverty and police harassment and rap about it. When I got to Atlanta in the mid-‘90s, death Row’s emerging, Bad Boy [Records is] hittin’ and we’re just about to enter the bling bling era. And Hip Hop is in a mood where it’s like I’m rich now, I got money.

And, I’m not gonna blame this on anybody, but I was actually being pushed into a direction where I would talk to people at Jive [Records], I would go talk to the President, Barry Weiss, and he was like – I always wanted to do these [side] projects like the E-40 duet album, which was one they never would let me do. Jive would never let me and E-40 do an album together. They kept making excuses and so it never got done. I also wanted to do an album that was filled with songs like “The Ghetto,” “Life Is…Too Short,” “Money In The Ghetto,” “I Want To Be Free.” I wanted to do a whole album of positive Too Short songs, just to keep that balance. I had made a verbal deal with Barry Weiss, where he was like, “Right now would be the perfect time, you should do like the raunchiest Too Short album ever – the album cover, the songs, just do a dirty fu*kin’ Too Short album.” This is the executive running the company advising me to put out an entire album of just cursing and s3x.

So I’m like, “If I did that I’d have to then do the exact opposite and follow-up that with an album that’s all positive.” And so, I did the album for him, we did You nasty. I thought it was a funny idea at first - we had like a pr0n star on the cover, I’m nekkid, the girls are nekkid and we really did a butt-nekkid photo shoot. And it got a gold album and all that stuff. But when it came time to do the positive album, it was never a good idea. It never got the green light. Once I did what they wanted, they would never let me do what I wanted.

I started noticing at that time in Hip Hop that the labels were actually signing the artists and promoting the artists who would bring in just the negative messages: let’s have s3x, drop ya b00ty. We getting off into Crunk now, the bling bling is out there … it’s going down. It was a new swag and everybody wanted to brag about – Rap has always been about bragging, but everybody wanted to brag about the millions. And I noticed that at a certain point in Hip Hop the major labels stopped signing and promoting the positive artists, the ones that was just really positive. Positive images were hard to get out there. So I’m just saying that at some point it wasn’t that Hip Hop changed on its own, it had a little push. I’m a real conspiracy theorist, and I just feel like there had to be a gathering of the major labels and somebody had to say like, “Look, we gotta keep this positive sh*t off the airwaves and let this b00ty-shaking sh*t take over. It’s time.” And after that it’s like the floodgates just opened with s3x and violence.

And it was on the radio! You couldn’t get Too Short songs on the radio back in the early days. But now I’m saying “Shake That Monkey” – the song is literally saying shake your v*gina – and it gets played on the radio. C’mon man.

DX: While I’m asking severely dated questions here …. I don’t know if it was a record label conspiracy or a personal choice, but I spoke to Shorty B back in late ’08 after his stroke and he said of you, “It seems like he has forgotten what got him to where he’s at. … He keep making these records with all these, ya know, Lil Jon and all that, that’s all cool and sh*t, but they ain’t us.” Do you have any regrets about your Crunk-era catalog and breaking away from Ant Banks, Shorty B and the rest of The Dangerous Crew and their live-music street symphony?

Too Short: Atlanta was the only thing that really broke that chemistry up.

The elements of what made Shorty The Pimp, Get In Where You Fit In, c*cktails and Gettin’ It – Pee Wee played keyboards and he was like a fu*kin’ Bernie Worrell, Jr. from Parliament. Ant Banks played a lot of piano, but he would be the main one programming the drums and he would mix all the songs and Banks would come with these clever little samples we’d be using. Shorty B played guitar and bass. And I would come in and do the vocals – sometimes we’d get somebody to sing on it. But I would come in and do my vocals and then me and Ant Banks would sit there and figure out how we’re gonna edit all this stuff together and arrange the instruments and stuff. And we’d make these wonderful fu*kin’ songs.

When we moved to Atlanta we moved as a unit, everybody came. I don’t know who left first, but Ant Banks and Pee Wee – Ant Banks, for his life, he had to get back to the Bay. He married the woman that he was in love with, and they had kids, they had a big house. So he had to get back. If he would have stayed in Atlanta he would have never had that life that he wanted so much with her. And Pee Wee, he basically just didn’t wanna live in Atlanta. So now it’s just me and Shorty B in Atlanta – this is probably during the Gettin’ It album. Banks wasn’t really here but he still mixed all the albums, he still did beats for ‘em, we still kept it going but it was kinda like drifting away.

So I don’t really see it as me breaking away, I see it as me going into – well I call that a certain Too Short era. Before I linked up with Ant Banks, Pee Wee and Shorty B, there was a whole different era. I was in that muthafu*ka making the beats myself. I can name you so many beats that I made myself off of Born To Mack, Life Is…Too Short and Short Dog’s In The House, before I got to the Shorty The Pimp album. And, to me that was a different era, just like when I used to rap off instrumentals and make little raggedy beats in my room and I never had put a record out that was a different era. I had eight years of a career before I even saw any fame outside of the Bay. I was famous in the Bay for eight years before that. And I look at that as like an era of my career. I look at the Shorty B, Ant Banks, Pee Wee years as an era.

I look at the move to Atlanta as another era. When I got with Lil Jon and we did the original version of “Bia Bia,” which was “You Just A bi*ch.” And it was so fu*kin’ dirty – Lil Jon had a song out called “I Like Dem Girlz,” and on the B-side there was a song called “You Just A bi*ch,” and it was getting more action in the streets than the A-side. So he was like, “Man, we gotta find a way to clean this sh*t up.” And that was the birth of “Bia Bia.” They put Ludacris on it and it was outta there. That was probably his first huge hit.

Right around that same time we had did “Couldn’t Be A Better Player” [from the Nationwide: Independence Day compilation in 1998]. That’s the first song that me and Lil Jon did together. It was a totally crunk song in the early days of Crunk, when the word had barely even got out there. When people used to talk about Atlanta Rap, and how Atlanta changed the sh*t and how the South was coming in, I was like, “Damn, I was right there.” They’ll never mention my name, but I was right the fu*k there helping that movement find its way. I was a major part of it.

That song, “Couldn’t Be A Better Player,” was a major turning point in my life. Lil Jon took me to this little-ass club, 559, and sat me at a table and didn’t tell me what the fu*k was going on. I a.ssumed that he was going to tell me to watch what the crowd does when the song comes on. So, sure enough, the song comes on and the people go crazy. Lil Jon was like, “Check this out” and they go crazy just on the fu*kin’ first note. The song takes a long time to come on, and just the sound of the 808 coming on they knew what it was and the crowd gets in a frenzy. So I was like, “Yeah, this is kind of what I was expecting.” Then it gets halfway through the song where Lil Jon used to have this signature breakdown, where the song gets kind of violent and sh*t and the whole fu*kin’ mood of the song changes into like some angry sh*t, and muthafu*ka that song came on – “What’s up fu*k n*gga, what’s up?” – and I looked around and it went from people going crazy out of they minds to people fu*king losing it. And he was like, “That’s what I wanted you to see.”

That turning point in my life was because I had never seen a party going crazy and hearing my voice at the same time. I never made party songs before that. And the only way I can describe it is the sh*t is infectious. I found a new lane where instead of it having to be Shorty The Pimp or Shorty the prophet, poet, whatever the hell you wanna call it, the “I Want To Be Free” Too Short, it turned into like some let’s have fun with Uncle Short. I almost kind of adopted parts of Luke Skywalker’s persona. It was working for me through Lil Jon. And he was doing it for Ying Yang [Twins], E-40 jumped in on the bandwagon later on and he got a few Lil Jon songs …. And if you ask E-40, what did those Lil Jon party beats do for your career? It was like a fu*kin’ extension chord. Lil Jon and that party sh*t extended my career. Lil Jon produced “Shake That Monkey” and he produced “Blow The Whistle” and from those two songs alone I got a hell of a extra run. I’m not even sure if I would be here right now trying to make album number 19, album number 20, if it wasn’t for the Lil Jon affiliation from 1995 to 2005, however long we were affiliated making a lot of songs. To me it was a no-brainer why I had to go with that movement.

I’m in a mood right now though where it’s like I truly cannot put this thing down and walk away from it until I make that one album that I told you about, the positive Too Short album. I gotta make it just ‘cause that’s me. It’s in me. And I would feel totally like I missed something if I didn’t do that. Just like I feel like not going to a Black college and marching in the marching band – that was my dream as a child, and not doing it has always bothered me. Always. I wanted to go to Grambling [State University] or somewhere and march and I didn’t do it. So this is another one of those situations.


Last edited by ice wolf; 04-25-2012 at 09:19 AM..
 6 years ago '11        #11
ImInHerMouth 1 heat pts
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 s7venwords said:
It may seem far fetched ( the meeting part ), but if you think about it, there is a pattern. If certain people in the music industry wanted to down size the black population they ( record execs ) did so by pushing stereo types of thugs so the kids who lived a normal life would be intrigued by that and commence to live out the raps, thus getting them caught up in the system and having it affect the rest of their lives.
We know they did that too. Artists are always complaining about how the execs are telling them what type of music to make. Wale said the same sh*t when he left Interscope, about white execs telling him what blacks want to hear.
 04-25-2012, 09:06 AM         #12
s7venwords  OP
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 Retro said:
You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to s7venwords again.

And word I get that. What we are subjected to has influence on decision making but it doesn't choose the decision for us. Like I said it's not only rap music's fault, but the media does have something to do with how we live & what we strive for. It's one of the strongest factors in the socialization process...
It's like that now in the US. All the people are hooked on these fake shows and reality bs that they think it's real and when they try to live it out the outcome is different. Take my cousin, she watches Mob Wives and it has changed her. She now thinks she's the oldest one of the 4, has these two fat bi*ches with her at family parties and has been falling back into what she was doing in her mid 20's ( she's 35 now with 4 kids ).
 6 years ago '04        #13
BackBlock_OG 34 heat pts34
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I always said when Onyx's "Throw ya Gunz" came out everything changed. It's ironic he said this meeting happened in '91, the same year that song came out. Story sounds believable tho.
 6 years ago '10        #14
Mocking Mind 2 heat pts
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Interesting...
 04-25-2012, 09:09 AM         #15
s7venwords  OP
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 23codez said:
I wonder what group of people were the masterminds behind this, if it's true.
Not trying to turn this into a race debate, read, research, and come up with your own opinion as I am going to do before discussing that.
 04-25-2012, 09:15 AM         #16
s7venwords  OP
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 23codez said:
Lol Lets not.. But the powers that be are usually of a certain color We all know that! But what kind of people of group is this? That's what I'm curious about. Feel me?

Edit: quoted you again by mistake backblock, my bad.
I know, and I am too. But I doubt the guy is gonna name any names.Anything else would be speculation.
 6 years ago '11        #17
ImInHerMouth 1 heat pts
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 BackBlock_OG said:
I always said when Onyx's "Throw ya Gunz" came out everything changed. It's ironic he said this meeting happened in '91, the same year that song came out. Story sounds believable tho.
Wasn't that on their album in 93? But I hear you,
 6 years ago '11        #18
ImInHerMouth 1 heat pts
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 s7venwords said:
I know, and I am too. But I doubt the guy is gonna name any names.Anything else would be speculation.
You're a jew?
 6 years ago '05        #19
ice wolf 515 heat pts515
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 23codez said:
Propping you! When that came out, the whole energy changed.
Yeah definitely. I'm a big Onyx fan, but if you didn't have a solid head on your shoulders listening to Onyx everyday could've influenced you to crack some heads open after school everyday.

.... and then you would've ended up sitting in a privatized prison cell.
 6 years ago '10        #20
Ant McQueen 16 heat pts16
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They did the same thing to black movies in the 70's. Those execs flooded the theatres in the black community with Blaxploitation films.
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