Official Boardwalk Empire Season 2 Thread

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 01-14-2012, 07:43 PM         #921
s7venwords  OP
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 young moolah said:
i finally got all caught up. season 1 was good but season 2 was amazing. it sad to see jimmy go. i wasn't expecting that at all. can't wait for season 3.
Yeah, it sucked to see him go, but to be true to history Jimmy was never a really big part of it.
 6 years ago '07        #922
young moolah 5 heat pts
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 s7venwords said:
Yeah, it sucked to see him go, but to be true to history Jimmy was never a really big part of it.
like some others have mentioned i think they should have kept him around for 1 more season. his character had a lot of depth. him and richard were a good team. the psychology of both those characters were interesting. plus they built up jimmy's character for 2 full seasons only to have him k!lled. 1 more season of him would have been nice.
 01-15-2012, 11:24 AM         #923
s7venwords  OP
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 young moolah said:
like some others have mentioned i think they should have kept him around for 1 more season. his character had a lot of depth. him and richard were a good team. the psychology of both those characters were interesting. plus they built up jimmy's character for 2 full seasons only to have him k!lled. 1 more season of him would have been nice.
In that aspect,yes I wish Jimmy was around to see where that was going cause you could see the sadness in Richards' face when seeing the blood on the rug, plus he had aspecial connection with Jimmys' deceased wife as she understood him.I hope Richard still has a main part as he is one of my favorites' on the show.

 6 years ago '05        #924
Gravediggaz 13 heat pts13
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so I'm guessing Richard gonna rise to power then since jimmy now his gone?
 01-15-2012, 06:09 PM         #925
s7venwords  OP
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 Gravediggaz said:
so I'm guessing Richard gonna rise to power then since jimmy now his gone?
I don't see that as he is a quiet and more comfortable in the background doing the dirty work.
 01-15-2012, 07:43 PM         #926
s7venwords  OP
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 01-16-2012, 11:09 AM         #927
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BEST EDITED ONE-HOUR SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

Boardwalk Empire: "To the Lost"

Tim Streeto

Game of Thrones: "Baelor"

Frances Parker, A.C.E.

Homeland: "Pilot"

Jordan Goldman, David Latham

 01-16-2012, 11:39 AM         #928
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At long last, HBO’s Boardwalk Empire arrives on DVD. The saga of Enoch “Nucky” Thompson (Steve Buscemi), debonair politician/outlaw and king of Atlantic City in the 1920’s. The pilot, directed by Martin Scorsese, opens on the eve of Prohibition, as party goers everywhere mourn the loss of sweet alcohol and a new era of bootlegging and rum running begins. Nucky’s right hand man and surrogate son is Jimmy Darmody (Michael Pitt), a young man who dropped out of Princeton to f!ght in WW1. Nucky has the entirety of Atlantic City in his pocket, from the Mayor to the Sheriff (who also happens to be his younger brother), to the woman who owns a French boutique. The masterful introduction to Nucky and Jimmy shows them leaving a Women’s Temperance Movement meeting (at which Nucky is the honored speaker), venturing down the crowded boardwalk, and in to a private dinner where every man has a drink in hand. At this dinner, the audience is introduced to the aforementioned Sheriff Elias Thompson (the ever excellent Shea Wigham) and a number of other important members of Nucky’s inner circle. From there, the pilot moves at a steady clip, introducing a number of characters and story lines in quick succession. Rather than feeling rushed, the pace seems to fit perfectly with that of the coming jazz age. Unfortunately, the rest of the series does not always follow suit. More on that later.
The cast is packed to the gills with one name-actor after another. It’s interesting to see Steve Buscemi, who’s known for his eccentric personality in films like Reservoir Dogs and Fargo, playing a man who is solid as a rock, unphased by anything that comes his way. Nucky has the entirety of Atlantic City in his pocket, from the Mayor to the Sheriff (who also happens to be his younger brother), to the woman who owns a French boutique. Pitt has maintained his baby face and thus believably plays a character 10 years younger than himself. The real revelation is Michael Shannon as federal agent Nelson Van Alden. Shannon is no stranger to playing odd characters, including his Academy Award-nominated role in Revolutionary Road. Van Alden is his own strange beast; a man with strong moral and religious convictions, but a seeming inability to sympathize with anyone. Another great surprise is Jack Huston (grandson of John; nephew of Anjelica) as Richard Harrow, a young man who lost half of his face while serving as a sniper in the US Army. While this character doesn’t come in to the series until the latter third, Huston’s moving portrayal and the character’s arc make a big impact. As wonderful as the cast is, the show’s greatest weakness is the often glacial pace of the character and plot development. With so many people and story lines, things should feel like they’re moving at lightning speed. Instead, the characters are too often seen repeating actions and having the same revelation multiple times.
The most impressive facet of Boardwalk is undoubtedly the production design. It’s refreshing to see such detailed work being done. While it’s necessary to have digital add-ins later on down the line, the main set for the show is itself several blocks long. The production designers have outdone themselves here. Any comments about inaccuracy in this department that I’ve heard thus far have been nitpicks. This same attention to detail goes in to the costume design and styling as well. Every character’s costume and makeup, from their hair to their shoes, tells the audience something about them.

On the Disc:
An array of informative commentaries fill out the each disc. The pilot commentary is done solely by series creator Terence Winter, who is knowledgeable about every facet of the show. “Atlantic City: The Original Sin City,” a short documentary featurette sheds light on the city by the sea, where the majority of the show takes place. Historians give their expert opinions (which sometimes conflict) about the real people and places portrayed. A second featurette, “Creating the Boardwalk” looks at the production side of the show. There’s also a speakeasy tour should you wish to get a firsthand look at one of the dens of sin. The creators also include an evolving character dossier to help those who can’t keep the dozens of key figures straight. Overall, it’s a well-produced package with entertaining content, but compared to the other stellar programming currently on television, Boardwalk Empire is slightly behind the pack.
-Stephanie Huettner






Last edited by s7venwords; 01-20-2012 at 10:38 AM..
 01-21-2012, 01:15 PM         #929
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Men are embracing an edgy but tailored retro hairstyle worn by Michael Pitt as 'Jimmy' Darmody on 'Boardwalk Empire.' It's a clean break from the scruffy hair of recent years.


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The haircut worn by Michael Pitt on "Boardwalk Empire": short on the sides, long on top and swept back. (Macall Polay, HBO / February 4, 2011)



By Adam Tschorn
Los Angeles Times
January 22, 2012
If the twentysomething guy from the mailroom, your waiter at Mozza and hipster music moguls all seem to be sporting the same haircut — trimmed buzz-cut short on the sides, left long on the top and swept back from the forehead — it's not your imagination. It's "Boardwalk Empire." Or, more precisely, it's a throwback haircut from Prohibition-era America, reintroduced in all its dapper disheveledness by Michael Pitt's James "Jimmy" Darmody character on the Martin Scorsese HBO series.

Darmody met with an untimely end on last month's Season 2 finale, but those who ply the tonsorial trade report that the show helped make the retro-flavored 'do the coif du jour among millennial males.

"It's been a popular cut for a good nine months to a year now," says J.P. Mastey, founder of the Baxter Finley Barber & Shop on La Cienega Boulevard. "It started getting popular here around the middle of the [show's] first season. A lot of guys will kind of know who the character is even if they don't know his name." But, Mastey says, "We know exactly who they're talking about."

Supercuts' senior artistic director Melanie Ash has noticed the same thing over the last year and a half. "Most places around the country, the style is slightly less exaggerated," Ash says. "And the more severe James Darmody look is one we're seeing stronger in our major metropolitan areas where there's a little more high fashion.... [Men in] Los Angeles, New York and Miami seem to prefer more of an extreme look, where it's much shorter through the sides and longer and more artsy on top."

The style perfectly suited Pitt's character — and for good reason, says the cut's creator, Francesca Paris, who is in charge of hair at "Boardwalk Empire." For the character of Jimmy Darmody, "I wanted to create something that was a little edgy, s3xy and a powerful look, and when I was researching men's hairstyles of the day, I noticed that the popular style was shorter on the sides and longer on the top," Paris said. "I wanted him to have a James Cagney-esque look about him. But Michael [Pitt] has a natural boyish quality to his look and his hair is naturally wavy, and wavy hair tends to project a softer demeanor. So I immediately knew I'd have to straighten his hair to toughen his image."

Mastey and Ash give the show — and Pitt's character — props for bringing the style to the public consciousness, but they, and other industry observers, say there are also other factors at work. One is the current pop culture embrace of all things 1920s and '30s, as exemplified in films such as "The Artist" and "Hugo" and fashion for spring.

Another is simply where men happen to be in the pendulum swing of personal grooming. "I think part of the appeal is that for the last couple of years we've really been seeing a trend toward longer lengths and a little more of a scruffier look," Ash says. "And this is a very tailored, exact cut. It's very clean and sharp so it's a nice change."

It's also a haircut that can cover all the bases. "It's slightly risky and aggressive-looking to cut it so short on the sides," Mastey says. "It's not exactly military, it's not exactly punk, but it's somewhere in between. You could put on a suit and tie and still pull it off. If my banker looked like that I wouldn't be taken aback by it."

Angel Gonzalez, master barber at the Art of Shaving flagship in Beverly Hills, points out that it's also popular because, with a minimum of effort, the hairdo can do double duty. "During the day you can get a debonair, sophisticated look by using a little bit of pomade," he said. "And at night, you can wash out the pomade and put in a little bit of matte texturizer to get a more rocker look."

That versatility conjures up images of the cut's shirttail cousin, the "business up front and party in the back" mullet, which was essentially a variation on the same silhouette that didn't cut as close on the sides, was full on the top and once past the ears cascaded down the back of the neck. But, where the mullet falls flat by its insistence on having it both ways, the Darmody (also referred to as an undercut) seems to succeed, in a gentlemanly way, at compromise.

It's not a coif every guy can pull off. "You've got to have the head shape and hairline for that [cut]," Mastey says. "If your hair is receding it's not the same look and you won't be able to slick it back the way [Pitt] does."

When twentysomething Kim Jong Un stepped into the limelight as North Korea's ruler a few days before the new year, it was hard not to notice his haircut: The sides were clipped short and the longer hair on top was slicked back a bit, and according to published reports, the barbershops of Pyongyang are abuzz with requests for what the North Koreans are calling the "youth" or "ambition" hairstyle.

Then again, perhaps they're all just fans of "Boardwalk Empire."



 01-22-2012, 04:20 AM         #930
s7venwords  OP
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"Boardwalk Empire" kept "Mad Men" from making it four in a row for Best Drama Series at the Producers Guild of America Awards Saturday. "Mad Men" had beaten "Boardwalk" at last fall's Emmys, winning there for the fourth year running.



 6 years ago '07        #931
young moolah 5 heat pts
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oh i forgot to mention van alden is one funny a.ss dude :lachen001:. they better keep him around.
 01-25-2012, 05:42 PM         #932
s7venwords  OP
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 young moolah said:
oh i forgot to mention van alden is one funny a.ss dude :lachen001:. they better keep him around.

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 01-26-2012, 03:35 PM         #933
s7venwords  OP
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 02-01-2012, 09:03 AM         #934
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'Great Escape Artist' shows will have 'Twenties surrealist' vibe.
By Steve Baltin
January 31, 2012 2:55 PM E

"We're starting to go over stage design and put together the stage, and I'm really happy that we're underway," he tells Rolling Stone, adding that video mapping will be a big part of the production. "The style of the show is what I'm calling Twenties surrealist with a Sixties, Warhol pop twist. I'm going through old archival films and finding some crazy stuff, like 1920s stag films."

He points to a couple of projects that have inspired the show's concept. "One is Boardwalk Empire. I love that time period. It's exciting – you had the speakeasies going and the underground people played a very big role in people entertaining themselves. The whole flapper thing was going on, and you had the surrealist movement," he says.

Another inspiration is a theater performance he caught in New York called Sleep No More. "They took over a five-story hotel for immersive theater," says Farrell, "whereby the people there to see the play were allowed to walk through this hotel, and then every once in a while a performer would come through. "

Buoyed by Sleep No More, the singer is planning something similar for the Jane's tour. "We want to do immersive theater, too. We've always had Siamese dancers, but we're gonna add another character, Bubba, who's going to be, in a way, the great escape artist. He's going to be moving people around, doing things in the audience," he says. "But I want the audience members to dress, as I said, with that Twenties surrealist twist if they can, or at least like they're going to a prom, because they're going to be within the show itself."

The band is focused entirely on this theater concept, to the point Farrell says they're skipping the American festival circuit this summer, including Lollapalooza in Chicago, which he founded. "We're not gonna play it, but that's not to say that we won't be in Chicago," he says. The band will, however, be at the debut of Lollapalooza Brazil in April. "I like the idea of christening the place, 'cause Jane's christened Lolla, so I just kind of feel like it's a goodwill gesture."

Ultimately, The Great Escape Artist tour is expected to last two years. During that time Farrell wants Jane's to release more new music. "What I have not seen before is a group that's done a record, had somewhat of a theme – escapism – and then done a second record almost as if it was a follow-up movie. I want to do that," he says. "We have material left from The Great Escape Artist we didn't record. I'm very inspired to keep with the theme. Something's feeling right about it."

Before the band hits the road they have one special show, playing the Rolling Stone Super Bowl party in Indianapolis this weekend before the game. While Farrell is a diehard basketball fan, he does have a prediction for the game. "I think it's Eli [Manning]. Eli in the clutch comes through in the end, and we shut down [Tom] Brady's offense with that great pass-rushing defensive line of the Giants," he says. "I would hate for anybody in Boston to think I don't love them, but I'm a New Yorker and I gotta stand by my state."

Read more:
 02-06-2012, 09:06 AM         #935
s7venwords  OP
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 02-08-2012, 06:57 AM         #936
s7venwords  OP
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 02-10-2012, 04:48 AM         #937
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Stephen DeRosa and Paz de la Huerta in a scene from HBO's "Boardwalk Empire."
Photo by Courtesy Macall B. Polay/HBO

The actor talks to Atlantic City Weekly about his portrayal of the iconic entertainer Eddie Cantor on HBO's 'Boardwalk Empire.'

By Jeff Schwachter |Posted Feb. 9, 2012

Stephen DeRosa is a character actor who has appeared on HBO's Boardwalk Empire, portraying the legendary singer Eddie Cantor.

DeRosa. who sings two songs on the show's GRAMMY-nominated soundtrack, spoke to Atlantic City Weekly towards the end of the show's second season in 2011.

The gorgeous and poignant "Life's A Funny Proposition After All" closes the first season and the soundtrack album; did you know that was going to be the final song in season one when you sang it?

No. In 2009 we shot the pilot and the pilot had the song. As the show progressed, the writers, obviously led by Terry [Winter] and [Martin] Scorsese, influence the evolution of the series. I think the music was chosen by Jim Dumbar and Randy Posner. Randy is the music producer and then Jim Dumbar and Vince Giordano had enormous amounts of influence in making suggestions about what they should use for the episodes as they were being written and created. I would get a phone call if they wanted me to sing something and then, of course, my job is then to make sure it feels as authentically Eddie as possible. Eddie lived in a kind of musically optimistic 1920s place even though he had a sh*tty childhood. His parents died when he was young but his grandmother raised him and he was little and scrawny so he got beaten up a lot. He learned to make jokes so he could avoid getting beaten up, so from then on he realized this singing and dancing thing could work.

So there is a lot of input regarding the music, which plays such an important role on the show?


[Yeah], you have these different people making suggestions for filling up the music of the series in season one and then Randy at the head talking to Terry. But obviously Terry and the writers have a vision and creativity. They want whatever is going on culturally, whether they are bringing in a prize f!ghter or the [song] "Japanese Sandman {listen}," with a nekkid girl in a wh0orehouse. They want to obviously serve the story. So I get a phone call at the end of the season and they say Eddie is going to be in the final episode, and I’m like, 'Amazing, can’t wait!' And then they said: 'Terry found a song that we’re figuring out and we want you to do but we don’t know how we want you to do it.' I get this material and I want to do it the way Eddie would have done it and not only [the] way Eddie would have done it, I want to do it the way [he would have done it] at Babette's [nightclub] at midnight [with] a kind of "Old Lang Syne" kind of feeling. And at the same time, my first instinct was to go to the sad place because we had talked about that, but that’s not what the '20s were about and it certainly wasn’t what Eddie was about. It was about irony. It was about, yeah, things are crazy and fu*ked up, but we are still hopeful about the future. We have to make peace with it. When I got that song I was like, 'Terry where the hell did you find this?' And Terry said, 'I just knew I wanted to find a song to close out season one and I just looked around and said there it was, that’s my song.'


 6 years ago '10        #938
KillaJ008 4 heat pts
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i decided to give this show a try. is it any good?
 6 years ago '11        #939
GangGreen227 42 heat pts42
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 KillaJ008 said:
i decided to give this show a try. is it any good?
fu*k yea
 02-19-2012, 04:00 PM         #940
s7venwords  OP
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 GangGreen227 said:
fu*k yea



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