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 7 years ago '06        #141
hollyfield420 23 heat pts23
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wasn't jesus Arab?
 7 years ago '08        #142
JetsLost 18 heat pts18
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First pic is my new bbn profile picture
 7 years ago '06        #143
ClevelandRay 
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The Bible also says you should'nt get Tattoo or cut your beard or your hair too but people do it. In the end it's all about how you interpret what you read. Some people think that Jay Z is the greatest at what he does or that Michael Jordan is the best player ever but there are some that think that wrong and have information to back it up (like Bill Russell having more rings and 2pac creating a movement that some say paved the way for the Lil Waynes and Jay-Z's.

Just as long as you believe in something, because if you don't you just might fall for anything.
 7 years ago '06        #144
ClevelandRay 
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Jesus was a Jewish Carpenter
 7 years ago '06        #145
CuZzA 17 heat pts17
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 ClevelandRay said:
The Bible also says you should'nt get Tattoo or cut your beard or your hair too but people do it.
No it doesn't.

If you can give me the exact verse (or verses) in the Bible where it says that WE (let me emphasise that even more so you don't end up looking too stupid...WE) cannot get tattoos, cut our beards or cut our hair, then you would have made one the most astonishing Biblical discoveries known to man - purely because you'd have been the only one to discover this verse.

Let me just give you a heads up. I know exactly what verses you're going to post. Do me a favour, read the verse, then do a bit of research. Don't bother posting it, because my reply will make you look stupid.
 7 years ago '04        #146
dblock278 1 heat pts
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 CuZzA said:


Question: "Is there any validity to the Zeitgeist movie?"

Answer: The “Zeitgeist movie,” which is available for viewing on the Web – , is essentially a baseless conspiracy theory focused on attacking the Christian faith and the government of the United States. What is interesting, though, is that while nearly all the a.ssertions put forth in the movie are completely wrong, the end fear promoted by the movie is correct and backed by Scripture (depending on one’s view of biblical eschatology).

The purpose of this article is to address the first conspiracy theory (out of four) put forth in the movie—that Jesus is a mythological amalgamation of various pagan gods and deities invented by the Egyptians and other cultures. Time will not be spent addressing the two major claims that follow in the movie—that the U.S. government architected and planned the attacks that occurred on 9/11 (with a.ssertions being made that a pattern of such domestic attacks exists in history) and that there is a major banking conspiracy attempting to control the finances of all U.S. citizens and ultimately, the world. In the end, a comment will be made concerning the last theory—that a one-world government is coming.

The allegations concerning Jesus in the Zeitgeist movie can be summarized as follows: the Jesus proclaimed in the Bible is not a historical person, and in fact He never existed. Instead, Jesus is an invention of the biblical authors who painstakingly copied attributes of ancient pagan deities and created a new god to be worshiped. Jesus mirrors various pagan deities in the manner of His birth, life, death, and resurrection.

Further, the movie a.sserts that astrology is the foundation behind much of the writing in Scripture. The end conclusion is that Christianity is a myth—just as all the pagan religions that came before it—and is therefore untrue. To address these a.ssertions, it is helpful to break them down into three groups:

• The subject of astrology and the Bible.
• The supposed similarities between Jesus and mythological heroes.
• The evidence for the truthfulness of the gospel accounts.

The Zeitgeist movie (from the German meaning “spirit of the age” or literally “time” [Zeit] “spirit” [Geist]) claims that the Bible is based on astrology and the stars. Perhaps one of the most telling statements in all the Bible regarding the importance God places on the stars is found in Genesis 1:16b: “He made the stars also.” This simple statement reveals the extent of the importance of the stars’ creation. Some biblical commentators have said this brevity of description is deliberate as God wants to in no way give the stars significance. In truth, rather than giving the stars, sun, and moon any value beyond what they were created for, there are a number of places in Scripture that denounce their worship. Deuteronomy 4:19 says, “And when you look up to the sky and see the sun, the moon and the stars—all the heavenly array—do not be enticed into bowing down to them and worshiping things the LORD your God has apportioned to all the nations under heaven.” In fact, Deuteronomy 17:2-5 prescribes a death sentence for anyone found worshiping the creation rather than the Creator.

In Isaiah 47:13 God mockingly asks if the stargazers can actually protect those who follow them from the real Power of the universe: “All the counsel you have received has only worn you out! Let your astrologers come forward, those stargazers who make predictions month by month, let them save you from what is coming upon you.” So the Zeitgeist movie’s claim that the Bible is based on astrology goes against what is written in the Book itself.

In addition to the faulty concept of astrology and the Bible being joined at the hip, the specific statements made in the film about this supposed link disregard historical facts. For example, the movie states that the number 12 in the Bible refers to the 12 zodiacal signs. So the 12 patriarchs, 12 tribes of Israel, and 12 disciples of Jesus are supposed to match the number of the astrological signs. This is out of the realm of possibility, as Genesis was written around 1000 B.C. with the actual events having occurred much earlier. History shows that the division of the stars/constellations into the 12 zodiacal signs did not occur until the Babylonians made the divisions around the fifth century B.C.

The meatier part of the first section of the movie is devoted to allegations of Jesus being nothing but a combination of pagan deities whose attributes the gospel writers borrowed to create their own new god. The main authority used in this portion of the movie, and the first major mythological figure presented as a forerunner of Jesus, is the Egyptian god Horus. If we see that the research on their primary character is flawed, it follows that the same faulty investigation methods/materials will be present in everything else.

The Zeitgeist movie makes these claims about the Egyptian god Horus:
• He was born on December 25 of a virgin (Isis Mary)
• A star in the East proclaimed his arrival
• Three kings came to adore the new-born “savior”
• He became a prodigious teacher at age 12
• At age 30 he was “baptized” and began a “ministry”
• Horus had twelve “disciples”
• Horus was betrayed
• He was crucified
• He was buried for three days
• He was resurrected after three days

If true, this would certainly be unsettling to followers of Christ. However, examining each point in detail is quite revealing. First, it is true that Egyptian legend has Horus being born to Isis. But where did the trailing name of “Mary” that used in the movie come from? No mention in any Egyptian literature links the name Isis to the name Mary. Isis was also not a virgin. No account of Horus’ birth makes this statement. Isis was not a virgin, but the widow of Osiris, another Egyptian god who conceived Horus with Isis. Finally, Horus was supposedly born during the month of Khoiak (Oct/Nov), and not on December 25, a fact which does not help their claim of marrying the stories of Horus and Jesus, anyway, because the Bible never a.ssigns a birth date to Christ.

Next, the film states that a star in the East announced Horus’ birth and that three kings came to bring gifts to the “savior.” However, when stories detailing the birth of Horus are examined, there is no star or three kings who come to visit him. Trying to link this to Christianity fails in any event, as the account of Christ’s birth in Matthew has magi (wise men, not kings) coming to Jesus with their actual number not being stated. Clearly, the movie is using the traditions of December 25 and three wise men, not the Bible, to link Jesus and Horus. Finally, the movie calls Horus a “savior.” There are no descriptions of Horus being a savior to anyone or serving in that capacity.

This is an important point: the movie takes extreme liberty in the quick and subtle uses of Christian words and phrases that in no way accurately describe the actual pagan god or his attributes. This is seen again in the statements of Horus being “baptized” and starting a “ministry.” The only accounts remotely related to Horus and water are the stories told of Osiris (his father who is sometimes combined in ancient accounts with Horus to form one individual) whose body was cut up into 14 pieces by his enemy, Set, and scattered throughout the earth. Isis supposedly found each part of the body and after having Osiris float in the Nile, he came back to life or became the lord of the underworld, depending on which account is read. In any event, stating that Horus was “baptized” is simply playing fast and loose with Christian terminology and is another obvious attempt to link mythology and the Bible.

In addition, Horus had no “ministry.” Horus becoming a teacher at age 12 (mimicking the account of Jesus at the temple as a youth) is nowhere to be found in accounts of Horus; neither are there any statements to the effect that he had 12 “disciples.” According to the Horus accounts, Horus had four semi-gods that were followers and some indications of 16 human followers and an unknown number of blacksmiths that went into battle with him. No accounts of Horus being betrayed are found in his portrayals and he certainly did not die by crucifixion in any account. There is an incident described in one story of Horus being torn to pieces, with Iris requesting that the crocodile god pull him out of the water, but the movie does not mention this, as it does not fit their agenda. Further, the movie puts the account of Horus as originating in 3000 B.C., which predates the invention and practice of crucifixion, so there is another historical problem that must be overcome.

The claims of Horus being buried for three days and resurrected are not to be found in any ancient Egyptian texts, either. Some accounts have Osiris being brought back to life by Isis and going to be the lord of the underworld. But there is no mention of a burial for three days and no mention of his physically coming out of a grave in the same physical body he went in with and never dying again. And there is certainly no account of Horus dying for others as Jesus did.

In the end, the attempt to prove Horus was a picture/forerunner of Jesus simply fails from lack of any historical evidence. The movie continues in this same vein with all the other mythological pagan deities that pre-dated Jesus (Attis, Krishna, etc.) As just another simple example, the Zeitgeist movie says that Hindu’s Krishna was also crucified and resurrected. However, Hindu teachings clearly state that Krishna was k!lled by an arrow shot from a hunter who accidentally hit him in his heel, and after he died, he ascended to be with Brahman. None of the pagan deities, when accurately examined, mirror the Son of God recorded in the New Testament Gospels.

Of course, neither does the movie note the following facts:
• The many archaeological details confirming New Testament accounts.
• The historically confirmed references to the details of the life of Christ.
• The early dating of the Gospel accounts during the lifetime of the eyewitnesses.
• The deep moral convictions of the authors and their commitment to truth.
• The accounts of the apostles going to their deaths for what they believed.
• The typology of Joseph and Jesus (used by the film to supposedly debunk the actual existence of Christ) is very well known and accepted by conservative Christian scholars as a foreshadowing of the first coming of Jesus.
• All the good produced by Christianity (see How Christianity Changed the World by Dr. Alvin Schmidt), which is brushed aside with only the crusades and other like events being highlighted.

It is interesting to note that Christianity is the only faith attacked in the movie—Islam, Hinduism, and others don’t warrant a mention. Though the faith of the producers is not exposed, there is a blurb at the end speaking to the effect that “all is one,” with a clip of noted evolutionist/materialist Carl Sagan saying that the earth is a single organism and that a “new consciousness is developing” that shows all is one. This is paganism, pure and simple.

At the end of the movie, religion is called a distraction engineered by a secret group of people who are using it (along with the media and other mechanisms) to dumb down the population so they will accept with open arms a coming one-world government. This is the one proposition put forth by the movie that is plausible insofar as it is backed by prophetic statements made in both the Old and New Testaments. The books of Daniel, 1 & 2 Thessalonians, and Revelation speak to the ambition of a world ruler who is to come.

It is interesting also that the movie quotes Jesus—someone they say never existed—from John 8:32: “You will know the truth, and the truth will make you free,” although they misquote it and say, “You must seek the truth and the truth will set you free.” The producers of the Zeitgeist movie, unfortunately, do not do this and instead choose to align themselves with very questionable and outright fabricated sources to malign Christianity and label it and all religions as pawns used by a secret organization they claim is currently working to take over the world. One thing is for certain, reaching such a conclusion using faulty materials certainly requires a lot of faith. Much more faith, in fact, than it takes to accept the truth and historical validity of Christianity.

Christians should not be surprised that such unfounded claims are invented in the imaginations of unbelievers and passed along by others as fact; in reality, such inventions are to be expected. Peter writes in his second epistle, “But there were also false prophets among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you. They will secretly introduce destructive heresies, even denying the sovereign Lord who bought them—bringing swift destruction on themselves” (2 Peter 2:1).
good read thanks
 7 years ago '10        #147
Jinusean 5 heat pts
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 bobbysteels18 said:
Jesus is the real deal all you non believers will see on judgement day.


Right, now when you get the judgment day correct this time around, then I'll believe you. Seriously, how many times did you get it wrong? I lost count at 50
 7 years ago '06        #148
swoosh363 1 heat pts
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nice
 7 years ago '06        #149
CuZzA 17 heat pts17
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 iMaGrOWNassMAN! said:
But Cuzza, theres one thing that I wanted to get your opinion on. What about the holidays such as Halloween, Christmas, Easter, etc.? I recently stopped celebrating some of them after a long talk with my pastor and I've been second guessing myself a bit lately. Your thoughts?
Sorry for the late reply, I've been mad busy. Can I just ask, what did you ask your pastor? What did he say? And which of those holidays have you stopped celebrating?

I'm going to hit this post in three parts. First, Christmas.

Christmas is obviously the most popular holiday in the Western world. The secular celebrate it, and the sacred celebrate it - but for different reasons. Some see it as the greatest business time of the year, which is fuelled by the exchange of gifts. Others consider it the time to celebrate the birth of Jesus. Either way, it is a very important holiday. The word "Christmas" comes from two old words: 'Christes' 'maesse'. It means, "the Mass of Christ." This comes from the Catholic Mass, that practice where the priest re-offers the sacrifice of Christ on the Cross during the time of Communion.

The origins of Christmas go back to before the time of Christ, when many ancient cultures celebrated the changing of the seasons. In the northern hemisphere in Europe, for example, the winter solstice, which was the shortest day of the year, occurs around Dec. 25th. These celebrations were based on the decline of winter as, during winter, animals were penned, people stayed indoors and crops didn't grow. To the society at this time, knowing that winter was half over and on its way out was a time of celebration.

In the ancient Roman system of religion, Saturn was the god of agriculture. Each year during the summer, the god Jupiter would force Saturn out of his dominant position in the heavenly realm and the days would begin to shorten. In the temple to Saturn in Rome, the feet of Saturn were then symbolically bound with chains until the winter solstice when the length of days began to increase. It was this winter solstice that was a time of celebration and exchange of gifts as the hardness of winter began to wane and the days grew longer.

December 25th also specifically coincided the day of the birth of the sun-god named Phyrgia, a culture in the ancient Balkans.

In the Roman Empire, by the time of Jesus was born, the winter festival was known as saturnalia. The Roman Church was unable to get rid of saturnalia, so early in the 4th Century, they adopted the holiday and tried to make it a Christian celebration of the Lord's birth. They called it the Feast of the Nativity, and it's this custom that has been part of western culture ever since.

Now, the debate between Christians about whether or not they should celebrate Christmas or not has been raging years. On both sides of the coin, there are equally committed and sincere Christians who all have their own reasons as to why they do or do not celebrate Christmas. First, let’s look at the reasons why Christians do not celebrate Christmas.

One argument against Christmas is that the traditions surrounding the holiday have origins in paganism. Searching for reliable information on this topic is difficult because the origins of many of our traditions are so obscure that sources often contradict one another. Bells, candles, holly, and yuletide decorations are mentioned in the history of pagan worship, but the use of such in one’s home certainly does not indicate a return to paganism. While there are definitely pagan roots to some traditions, there are many more traditions a.ssociated with the true meaning of Christmas—the birth of the Savior of the world in Bethlehem. Bells are played to ring out the joyous news, candles are lit to remind us that Christ is the Light of the world (John 1:4-9), a star is placed on the top of a Christmas tree to remember the Star of Bethlehem, and gifts are exchanged to remind us of the gifts of the Magi (not 'three wise men', as is falsely told in the 'Christmas story') to Jesus, the greatest gift of God to mankind.

Another argument against Christmas would be having a Christmas tree. One of the symbols of the life found in the celebration of saturnalia, was the use of evergreens. These plants, which stayed green all year long, were often used in different cultures as symbols of life and rebirth. They were sometimes decorated as a form of worship in varied cultures in religious ceremonies dealing with fertility. The Bible seems to forbid bringing trees into our homes and decorating them - the passage often cited is Jeremiah 10:1-16. However, this passage refers to cutting down trees, chiselling the wood to make an idol, and then decorating the idol with silver and gold for the purpose of bowing down before it to worship it (see also Isaiah 44:9-18). The passage in Jeremiah cannot be taken out of its context and used to make a legitimate argument against Christmas trees.

Christians who choose to ignore Christmas point to the fact that the Bible doesn’t give us the date of Christ’s birth, which is certainly true. December 25 may not be even close to the time Jesus was born and arguments on both sides are legion, some relating to climate in Israel, the practices of shepherds in winter, and the dates of Roman census-taking. None of these points is without a certain amount of conjecture, which brings us back to the fact that the Bible doesn’t tell us when Jesus was born. Some see this as proof that God didn’t want us to celebrate the birth, while others see the Bible’s silence on the issue as tacit approval.

Some Christians say that since the world celebrates Christmas - although it is becoming more and more politically correct to refer to it as ‘the holidays’ - Christians should avoid it. But that is the same argument made by false religions that deny Christ altogether, as well as cults such as the Jehovah’s Witnesses who deny His deity. Those Christians who do celebrate Christmas often see the occasion as an opportunity to proclaim Him as ‘the reason for the season’ among the nations and to those trapped in false religions.

So should a Christian celebrate a holiday that not only has pagan origins, but also is used by the unbelieving world as a promotion of commercialism? In my opinion, it depends.

The Christian must hold his standard of righteousness and devotion to God above those of the world. The Old Testament says that we are to worship God in truth according to the dictates that He has established (Exodus 20:1-4; 24:12-31:18). What you have to keep in mind is that Christmas was not established by God. In addition, there are no records at all of the early church celebrating the birth of Christ.

On the other hand, there are those who say we have freedom in Christ, and can celebrate any day we desire. Paul says, "All things are lawful, though not all are profitable" (1 Cor. 6:12). Should we then participate in the celebration of a festival whose origins are based on exceeding commercialism?

In my opinion, I believe we are free to celebrate the day. This is why.

In 1 Cor. 10:23-33, Paul speaks about meat sacrificed to idols. This meat was often sold in the meat market and the question arose, "Should a Christian each such meat?" Paul said in verse 25, "Eat anything that is sold in the meat market, without asking questions for conscience' sake." The origins of the meat were, essentially, pagan. Many animals were raised for the purpose of sacrificing to pagan deities and their meat was offered in the market place. In reference to this Paul said it was okay to eat the meat.

Then in verses 28-29 he says, "But if anyone should say to you, 'This is meat sacrificed to idols,' do not eat it, for the sake of the one who informed you, and for conscience' sake; I mean not your own conscience, but the other man's; for why is my freedom judged by another's conscience?" (NASB). Paul is basically saying that if you are with someone who might be affected by your eating meat that was sacrificed to idols, then don't eat it - not because of you, but because of the other person. In other words, eating that meat won't affect you. The false gods are not real. They have no power.

1 Cor. 8:-7-9 echoes this idea. It says, "However not all men have this knowledge; but some, being accustomed to the idol until now, eat food as if it were sacrificed to an idol; and their conscience being weak is defiled. But food will not commend us to God; we are neither the worse if we do not eat, nor the better if we do eat. But take care lest this liberty of yours somehow becomes a stumbling block to the weak." Though this passage requires a bit more examination, it still carries the sense of freedom. And Jesus has definitely set us free.

So as we have seen, there is no legitimate scriptural reason not to celebrate Christmas. At the same time, there is no biblical mandate to celebrate either. In the end, of course, whether or not to celebrate Christmas is a personal decision. Whatever Christians decide to do regarding Christmas, their views should not be used as a club with which to beat down or denigrate those with opposing views, nor should either view be used as a badge of honor inducing pride over celebrating or not celebrating. As in all things, we seek wisdom from Him who gives it liberally to all who ask (James 1:5), and accept one another in Christian love and grace, regardless of our views on Christmas.

However, if you are not comfortable with this conclusion and you don't want to celebrate Christmas, that is okay. Just make sure you keep God central to whatever decision it is that you make.

Now, Halloween is also obviously a very popular holiday. It is celebrated by millions of people every year all around the world as a fun time for kids, putting on costumes, and going door-to-door to get sweets/candy. But it is also known as a time of witches, ghouls, goblins, and ghosts. On one hand, some see Halloween as a harmless time of fun and on the other, a ghastly and demonically inspired night to be avoided.

As Christians, there is a lot of debate on whether or not we should participate in Halloween. Is it okay to go trick-or-treating? Can we dress our kids up in costumes on that day? If we do any of this, are we celebrating an evil holiday?

Whether or not Christians should celebrate Halloween can be a very controversial topic. Some Christians celebrate Halloween simply by dressing up in a costume and having fun, seeing it as innocent and harmless. Other Christians are equally convinced that Halloween is a satanic holiday established to worship evil spirits and promote darkness and wickedness. So, who is right? Is it possible for Christians to celebrate Halloween without compromising their faith?

Halloween, no matter how commercialized, has almost completely pagan origins. As innocent as it may seem to some, it is not something to be taken lightly. Christians tend to have various ways to celebrate or not to celebrate Halloween. For some, it means having an “alternative” Harvest Party. For others, it is staying away from the ghosts, witches, goblins, etc., and wearing innocuous costumes, e.g., little princesses, clowns, cowboys, super-heroes, etc. Some choose not to do anything, electing to lock themselves in the house with the lights off. With our freedom as Christians, we are at liberty to decide how to act.

Scripture does not speak at all about Halloween, but it does give us some principles on which we can make a decision. In Old Testament Israel, witchcraft was a crime punishable by death (Exodus 22:18; Leviticus 19:31; 20:6, 27). The New Testament teaching about the occult is clear. Acts 8:9-24, the story of Simon, shows that occultism and Christianity don't mix. The account of Elymas the sorcerer in Acts 13:6-11 reveals that sorcery is violently opposed to Christianity. Paul called Elymas a child of the devil, an enemy of righteousness and a perverter of the ways of God. In Acts 16, at Philippi, a fortune-telling girl lost her demon powers when the evil spirit was cast out by Paul. The interesting matter here is that Paul refused to allow even good statements to come from a demon-influenced person. Acts 19 shows new converts who have abruptly broken with their former occultism by confessing, showing their evil deeds, bringing their magic paraphernalia, and burning it before everyone (Acts 19:19).

So, should a Christian celebrate Halloween? The answer is simple: Yes and No.

The Christian should not be involved with or support the occult, witchcraft, demonism, or any other thing that uplifts the occult. To do so is contradictory to God’s word. If a Halloween celebration is centered on demons, devils, spirits, etc., I would say don't have anything to do with it.

Is it wrong to dress up in a costume and go door-to-door saying, "Trick or Treat." Provided that the costumes aren't demonic, I can't see anything wrong with this. It's just fun for the kids. However, are there things about Halloween that are anti-Christian and should be avoided? Absolutely. If parents are going to allow their children to participate in Halloween, they should make sure to keep them from getting involved in the darker aspects of the day. If Christians are going to take part in Halloween, their attitude, dress, and most importantly, their behavior should still reflect a redeemed life (Philippians 1:27). There are many churches that hold "harvest festivals" and incorporate costumes, but in a godly environment. There are also many Christians who hand out tracts that share the Gospel along with the Halloween candy. The decision is ultimately ours to make.

Let's take a look at the Christmas tree again. It was originally an ancient fertility symbol. Yet, it has become a representation of Christmas and the place where gifts are placed. Are the Christians, then, paying homage to an ancient pagan fertility god? No. Not at all. They do not consider it pagan at all and are simply joining in on a cultural event and giving no honor to anything unbiblical.

Is it any different with Halloween? No. Even though Halloween has pagan origins, because of your freedom in Christ, you and/or your kids can dress up in costumes and go door-to-door and just have fun. However, if you are not comfortable with doing this, then you should not. But as with all things, we are to incorporate the principles of Romans 14. We can’t allow our own convictions about a holiday to cause division in the body of Christ, nor can we use our freedom to cause others to stumble in their faith. We are to do all things as to the Lord.
 7 years ago '06        #150
CuZzA 17 heat pts17
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[-----Sorry I've had to use two posts, there's a 15,000 character limit, and the whole post hit nearly 20,000-----]

Finally, Easter. Another huge holiday.

There's always a lot of confusion regarding what Easter Sunday is all about. For some, Easter Sunday is about the Easter Bunny, colorfully decorated Easter eggs, and Easter egg hunts. Most people understand that Easter Sunday has something to do with the resurrection of Jesus, but are confused as to how the resurrection is related to the Easter eggs and the Easter bunny.

Biblically speaking, there is absolutely no connection between the resurrection of Jesus Christ and the common modern traditions related to Easter Sunday.

The origins of Easter are rooted in European traditions. The name 'Easter' comes from a pagan figure called Eastre (or Eostre), who was celebrated as the goddess of spring by the Saxons of Northern Europe. A festival called Eastre was held during the spring equinox by these people to honour her. The goddess Eastre’s earthly symbol was the rabbit, which was also known as a symbol of fertility. Originally, there were some very pagan (and sometimes utterly evil) practices that went along with the celebration. Today, Easter is almost a completely commercialized holiday, with all the focus on Easter eggs and the Easter bunny being remnants of the goddess worship.

In the Christian faith, Easter has come to mean the celebration of the resurrection of Christ three days after His crucifixion on Good Friday. It is the oldest Christian holiday and the most important day of the church year because of the significance of the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ, the events upon which Christianity is spirtually based. Easter Sunday is also preceded by the season of Lent, a 40-day period of fasting and repentance culminating in Holy Week and followed by a 50-day Easter season that stretches from Easter to Pentecost.

The Bible makes it clear that Jesus was resurrected on the first day of the week, Sunday (Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:2,9; Luke 24:1; John 20:1,19). Jesus' resurrection is most worthy of being celebrated (see 1 Corinthians 15). While it is appropriate for Jesus' resurrection to be celebrated on a Sunday, the day on which Jesus' resurrection is celebrated should not be referred to as Easter. Easter has nothing to do with Jesus' resurrection on a Sunday.

Because of the commercialization and pagan origins of Easter, many churches prefer to refer to it as “Resurrection Sunday.” The rationale is the more we focus on Christ and the less we focus on the pagan holiday, the better. As I said before, the resurrection of Christ is the central theme of Christianity. Paul says that without this, our faith is futile (1 Corinthians 15:17). What more wonderful reason could we have to celebrate. What is important is the true reason behind our celebration, which is that Christ resurrected from the dead, making it possible for us to have eternal life (Romans 6:4).

So should we celebrate Easter or allow our children to go on Easter eggs hunts? This is a question both parents and church leaders struggle with. There is nothing essentially evil about painting and hiding eggs and having children search for them. What is important is our focus. If our focus is on Christ and not the eggs, our children will understand that the eggs are just a game. Children can participate in an Easter egg hunt as long as the true meaning of the day is explained and emphasized, but ultimately this must be left up to the discretion of parents.

As a result, many Christians feel strongly that the day on which we celebrate Jesus' resurrection should not be referred to as "Easter Sunday." Rather, something like "Resurrection Sunday" would be far more appropriate and biblical. For the Christian, it is unthinkable that we would allow the silliness of Easter eggs and the Easter bunny to be the focus of the day instead of Jesus' resurrection.

But by all means, celebrate Christ's resurrection on Easter Sunday. Christ's resurrection is something that should be celebrated every day, not just once a year. At the same time, if we choose to celebrate Easter Sunday, we should not allow the fun and games to distract our attention from what the day should truly be all about - the fact that Jesus was resurrected from the dead, and that His resurrection demonstrates that we can indeed be promised an eternal home in Heaven by receiving Jesus as our Saviour.
 7 years ago '04        #151
ShaneDawg 2 heat pts
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 bobbysteels18 said:
Jesus is the real deal all you non believers will see on judgement day.
and what day is that?
 7 years ago '10        #152
GBREEZE 260 heat pts260
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 CuZzA said:
[-----Sorry I've had to use two posts, there's a 15,000 character limit, and the whole post hit nearly 20,000-----]

Finally, Easter. Another huge holiday.

There's always a lot of confusion regarding what Easter Sunday is all about. For some, Easter Sunday is about the Easter Bunny, colorfully decorated Easter eggs, and Easter egg hunts. Most people understand that Easter Sunday has something to do with the resurrection of Jesus, but are confused as to how the resurrection is related to the Easter eggs and the Easter bunny.

Biblically speaking, there is absolutely no connection between the resurrection of Jesus Christ and the common modern traditions related to Easter Sunday.

The origins of Easter are rooted in European traditions. The name 'Easter' comes from a pagan figure called Eastre (or Eostre), who was celebrated as the goddess of spring by the Saxons of Northern Europe. A festival called Eastre was held during the spring equinox by these people to honour her. The goddess Eastre’s earthly symbol was the rabbit, which was also known as a symbol of fertility. Originally, there were some very pagan (and sometimes utterly evil) practices that went along with the celebration. Today, Easter is almost a completely commercialized holiday, with all the focus on Easter eggs and the Easter bunny being remnants of the goddess worship.

In the Christian faith, Easter has come to mean the celebration of the resurrection of Christ three days after His crucifixion on Good Friday. It is the oldest Christian holiday and the most important day of the church year because of the significance of the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ, the events upon which Christianity is spirtually based. Easter Sunday is also preceded by the season of Lent, a 40-day period of fasting and repentance culminating in Holy Week and followed by a 50-day Easter season that stretches from Easter to Pentecost.

The Bible makes it clear that Jesus was resurrected on the first day of the week, Sunday (Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:2,9; Luke 24:1; John 20:1,19). Jesus' resurrection is most worthy of being celebrated (see 1 Corinthians 15). While it is appropriate for Jesus' resurrection to be celebrated on a Sunday, the day on which Jesus' resurrection is celebrated should not be referred to as Easter. Easter has nothing to do with Jesus' resurrection on a Sunday.

Because of the commercialization and pagan origins of Easter, many churches prefer to refer to it as “Resurrection Sunday.” The rationale is the more we focus on Christ and the less we focus on the pagan holiday, the better. As I said before, the resurrection of Christ is the central theme of Christianity. Paul says that without this, our faith is futile (1 Corinthians 15:17). What more wonderful reason could we have to celebrate. What is important is the true reason behind our celebration, which is that Christ resurrected from the dead, making it possible for us to have eternal life (Romans 6:4).

So should we celebrate Easter or allow our children to go on Easter eggs hunts? This is a question both parents and church leaders struggle with. There is nothing essentially evil about painting and hiding eggs and having children search for them. What is important is our focus. If our focus is on Christ and not the eggs, our children will understand that the eggs are just a game. Children can participate in an Easter egg hunt as long as the true meaning of the day is explained and emphasized, but ultimately this must be left up to the discretion of parents.

As a result, many Christians feel strongly that the day on which we celebrate Jesus' resurrection should not be referred to as "Easter Sunday." Rather, something like "Resurrection Sunday" would be far more appropriate and biblical. For the Christian, it is unthinkable that we would allow the silliness of Easter eggs and the Easter bunny to be the focus of the day instead of Jesus' resurrection.

But by all means, celebrate Christ's resurrection on Easter Sunday. Christ's resurrection is something that should be celebrated every day, not just once a year. At the same time, if we choose to celebrate Easter Sunday, we should not allow the fun and games to distract our attention from what the day should truly be all about - the fact that Jesus was resurrected from the dead, and that His resurrection demonstrates that we can indeed be promised an eternal home in Heaven by receiving Jesus as our Saviour.
Point being, all of these holidays have roots of paganism......The Bible states learn not the way of the heathen.......
 7 years ago '06        #153
CuZzA 17 heat pts17
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 ShaneDawg said:
and what day is that?
Nobody knows. Not even Jesus knows. The Bible explicitly states in Matthew 24:36 that only God the Father knows ("But about that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.")


 GBREEZE said:
Point being, all of these holidays have roots of paganism......The Bible states learn not the way of the heathen.......
Did you not read what I wrote? It's not what day or date we celebrate, it's our focus. We don't 'celebrate' Christmas, because if we did, we'd be celebrating the turn of shorter days - but we celebrate the birth of Christ instead. We don't 'celebrate' Easter either, because if we did, we'd be celebrating the coming of longer days at the turn of the Spring equinox - but we choose to celebrate the death and ultimate resurrection of Christ instead. And we certainly don't 'celebrate' Halloween, because if we did, we'd be involved with, or support, the occult, witchcraft, demonism, or anything else that uplifts the occult. In doing so contradicts the word of God.

But that's the thing you clearly don't understand - you don't even 'celebrate' Christmas, Easter or Halloween. You give and receive gifts, and spend time with your family on the 25th December, you/your kids dress up in costumes and and give/receive sweets/candy on 31st October, and you give/receive chocolate eggs sometime in March/April. Practically nobody 'celebrates' these holidays as they were first celebrated.

So don't come at me with, "You shouldn't celebrate these holidays!", because we don't, and technically, neither does anybody else.
 7 years ago '04        #154
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 Blockburner28 said:
I don't agree with that big homie. Growing up I never knew Fornication was was wrong.
fornication is not wrong. its how we survive as a species. religious texts will tell you it is wrong, while every fiber in your being knows it is right
 7 years ago '06        #155
CuZzA 17 heat pts17
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 ShaneDawg said:
fornication is not wrong. its how we survive as a species. religious texts will tell you it is wrong, while every fiber in your being knows it is right
@ "it's how we survive as a species."

Fornication (pre-marital s3x, remember) is wrong - biblically, but obviously not by society's standards. But then again, I know as a fact you't can turn around and tell me that society is doing a great job right now, in terms of teenage mothers, single mothers, divorce rate, contracted STIs and abortion figures

However, I can look at the Bible and confidently say that if we were to live biblically, there would be no teenage mothers (unless the two teenagers were married), there would be no single mothers (unless the father tragically died), there would be no divorce, STIs I admittedly can't have an opinion on because I don't really know much about it (I guess I've got to step up my knowledge game there ), and there would be no abortion. There wouldn't even be abortion due to r*pe because r*pe would come under the umbrella of s3xual intercourse outside the constraints of marriage.


Last edited by CuZzA; 11-08-2010 at 10:22 PM..
 11-08-2010, 11:11 PM         #156
-BigC- 
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If you lived biblically there would be a lot of things you can't do, again it would come down to how you interpret it though

And if we could make a set of rules to follow, it would be much better to not use the bible but just make one based off of the common norms of society.
 7 years ago '06        #157
CuZzA 17 heat pts17
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 -BigC- said:
If you lived biblically there would be a lot of things you can't do, again it would come down to how you interpret it though
Too many people focus on what Christians don't do, rather than what they do do. It's ridiculous, and unfair. Everybody thinks that Christianity is a list of rules; a list of do's and don'ts. No - that's what religion teaches. Christians all around the world will tell you that they're not religious, and that that the Christian faith isn't a religion. You've probably heard it yourself before. That may seem strange since, after all, Christians believe in God, and they go to church. But there is a reason for this, and we believe it is biblical. Religion is completely antithetical to the Gospel.
Religion tells the story of self-imposed righteousness, a sort of, "I am accepted because I obey.” But the Bible puts it differently: In Christ, we obey because we are accepted. Scripture is very clear that no one is righteous by personal merit.

In religion, man holds himself to his own standards. But simply exerting willpower to achieve moral goals leads only to self-righteousness. And when we fall short of our standards, we become insecure.

Religion says:
“I must earn God’s grace by my good works and by my own efforts.”
Gospel says:
“I am fully justified before God, and yet I sin. God continues to pour out His grace and that gives me confidence to live out the likeness of Christ through the power of the Holy Spirit.” (1 Cor. 4:7-18)

Religion says:
“When I suffer, my works failed.”
Gospel says:
I can trust God that all things work together for good because I am included in His purpose." (Romans 8:28) - God is enough in the midst of my suffering.”

Religion says:
“I find my own worth in my own morality.”
Gospel says:
“My worth is Jesus sent by God through the Holy Spirit.” (Col. 1:27-28)

Religion says:
“My obedience gets me accepted.”
Gospel says:
“I am accepted by the unconditional love of God so that I can be obedient.” (1 John 5:3) - If you asked any Muslim whether or not they were going to Paradise, they couldn't confidently say "Yes!", because their acceptance into Paradise from Allah is based on whether or not the good works carried out during their life outweigh the bad.

Religion says:
“Sin is a reminder of how bad I am.”
Gospel says:
“My sin reminds me of how good God is, by loving me at my worst. When I am at my worst, He is at His best.” (Romans 5:10)

Religion says:
“Try to be a better Christian/Muslim/Hindu.” (Yes, there are religious Christians - they're the ones you don't like)
Gospel says:
“The blood of Christ made us Christians. It is by no works of our own. Our good or bad behavior does not make us more or less a Christian.” (Rom. 3:21-26)

So it's clear that the Gospel reveals the love of God in the face of our risen Savior Jesus Christ, given to us by the Holy Spirit. God brings the believer back to Himself through His own love and merit, glorifying Himself in our Redemption. It is not about us, it is about Him, and what he has done on the cross.

We are just simply unable to measure up to God’s demands for perfection. And no amount of do-gooding, well-intentioned religion can save us. Simply put, we are separated from God as a result of sin. The only way to be reconciled with God is through the God-man Jesus, who lived the perfect life and died the perfect death on our behalf. The perfect law of God is meant to show us our sin and yet that same law cannot produce the righteousness that it commands, and religion begets self-righteousness. Nevertheless, people are still inclined to set self-imposed religion as a means to work out a way to get to God.
But Jesus demolishes this paradigm when he states that sin begins in the heart. (Matthew 5:28)

In light of what Jesus says, now we know that we did not behave our way to God. Salvation is a free gift given to us by no merit of our own. If we could not behave our way to God, how could we possibly think we can maintain oneness with God in our own behavior?

God seeks man, man cannot seek God (1 John 4:10). Scripture clearly tells us that God chose us and gives us the ability to respond to Him. But we tend to see life as if it is our story and Jesus is simply a component of our lives. So Jesus invites us into the story of God, we do not invite Him into ours. If we do not understand this truth, we will spend most of our time trying to fit God into little scenes in our story, which leads to believing that God is made into our image. This makes life about us. THIS is religiousness because we morph God into our will, our needs, our desires, and our hopes. Religion always makes it about self.

Finally, self-righteousness denies the need for Jesus’ cross. We see that we cannot work for the love of God. We see that God, through His love, by the power of the Holy Spirit has taken our sin and given it to Jesus, and given us His righteousness because we could not work for the love of God. God is love. He loves for the sake of loving (1 John 4:15-16). Man’s religion says that we need to live by certain rules and regulations so that we can obtain and maintain God’s love. That is impossible for man to do. Col 2:20-23 shows us that rules do not work. Even when our self-made religion may look like wisdom, it does nothing for stopping the indulgence of the flesh. In Romans 7, God shows us that His law is perfect, and that we are unable to perform it as God demands. Instead, we need a Redeemer who has already fulfilled the law for us. (Romans 7:7-12)

And if we could make a set of rules to follow, it would be much better to not use the bible but just make one based off of the common norms of society.
We do have a set of rules to follow - it's called 'the law'. And like I said before, society's law is flawed. God's law isn't.
 7 years ago '04        #158
persuazion 2 heat pts
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I cant believe people are still believing this nonsense that has been spoon fed to them since a baby....dont you see its all about what region your born in or what your family believes in? SHould I just pick a religion out the hat and roll with it and hope its the correct one? Plus its kind of an a**hole thing to a.ssume you know what happens when you die and tell people how their going to burn and be tortured for eternity because they dont believe in the same thing you do.Why would you even want to follow and base your life and moral values on some s**t like that? I know that every year the Atheist and Agnostic population grows so hopefully one day we can have a f**king general population with some common sense.
When it all comes down to it.............
This Jesus
[pic - click to view]

>> Your Jesus
 7 years ago '06        #159
CuZzA 17 heat pts17
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 persuazion said:
I cant believe people are still believing this nonsense that has been spoon fed to them since a baby
I became a Christian when I was 17.

dont you see its all about what region your born in or what your family believes in?
My entire family are all atheists/agnostics.

SHould I just pick a religion out the hat and roll with it and hope its the correct one?
Sure, but you might want to research first though. Have you even read the whole thread? Or just come in here with an uninformed, ignorant opinion? Read everything I've said, and come back and tell me you've got to just 'pick a religion out the hat and hope it's the correct one'.

Plus its kind of an a**hole thing to a.ssume you know what happens when you die and tell people how their going to burn and be tortured for eternity because they dont believe in the same thing you do.
Christians only a.ssume because of the Bible, and it's scary to think you have no idea how historically, factually, theologically, archaeologically reliable the Bible is. Also, you won't be sent to hell because you don't believe the same thing as we do, you're sent to hell for not believing in God. What makes you think you can choose not to live with God in this life, then choose to be with Him in the next life? God doesn't send you to hell. You do.

Why would you even want to follow and base your life and moral values on some s**t like that?
Because it works? Look at the society in which you live now and tell me it works. All you have to do is look back on the last page as proof that society no longer works.

I know that every year the Atheist and Agnostic population grows so hopefully one day we can have a f**king general population with some common sense.
Common sense? You do realise that atheism is also a statement of faith, and agnosticism is doomed to complete failure right? Like I said earlier in the thread (if you'd have been bothered to read):

Athiests can offer no logical, irrefutable proof for his/her case. He/she may draw on certain philosophical arguments, personal experiences or 'informed opinions' - but in the end, none of this will be conclusive proof. Not only that, but the very nature of his/her case is difficult: it is always harder to establish clearly what is not than to establish what is.

Say, for example, I call downstairs to my girlfriend in the morning,
"I can't find my keys!"
She says, "They're in the spare room!"
I look for a few moments, then yell, "No, they're not!"
"Yes, they are!", she replies.

It's much easier for her to prove her case. If she comes upstairs and finds my keys, she was right. Even if she can't find them straight away, she may still be right if they are found later. To prove my (your) case, I have to search every inch of the room, leaving absolutely no space unexplored. She will only have been proved wrong when I have done all of this. Similarly, atheism can only be proved right if every single scrap of information is ferreted out and analysed for traces of God.

A completely impossible task.

Not even the most arrogant of human beings would claim to know everything. Yet, without this knowledge, how can the atheist say for certain that God does not exist? The statement, 'There is no God' has 'Case unproven' written all over it.

Being an atheist also means living every day with the possibility that evidence will come to light which will prove them wrong. Back to my analogy of the keys earlier - every moment of the search could prove me wrong; every moment could prove my girlfriend right. I can only be right at the end of a long search; she could be right any time during the search.

This is a trivial illustration, but if the outcome of our search were crucial, my every moment would be filled with dread at being proved wrong; hers would would be filled with the hope of being proved right. So, logically speaking, an atheist is never secure until he or she has explored all the options.

And when was the last time you heard someone say, "Becoming an atheist has turned my life around completely. Before I was an atheist, I used to be an alcoholic who beat my wife; now I've become the ideal family man"? Atheism just doesn't have that kind of moral power. The Christian, on the other hand, can point to dozens of examples of the difference that knowing God has made to people's lives.

Here's a great story:
Charles Bradlaugh, an outstanding intellectual of the nineteenth century, challenged a local preacher of the gospel to a debate in London. The debate was to compare the claims of Christianity with the claims of atheism. The minister, Hugh Price Hughes, agreed to the challenge on one condition: Bradlaugh would bring with him a hundred people whose lives had been changed by their commitment to atheism. If he did so, then Hughes would bring a hundred people whose lives had been changed by knowing God. To drive his point home, Hughes offered to debate with Bradlaugh if he could bring fifty people, or twenty, or ten, and finally if he could bring one man or woman whose life had been transformed by atheism. Charles Bradlaugh had to withdraw from the debate, as he realised that atheism has no moral power to change lives.
See what I mean? You talk about common sense, but it's your lack of it which is making you, and others, look continually stupid.

In terms of agnosticism, an agnostic is someone who says that they don't know whether there is a God or not. Perhaps there is, perhaps there isn't. People often spend quite a long time in this state of 'not knowing' as they struggle to find out about God. Anyone who is genuinely unsure must have our respect.
But sometimes people are agnostic in a more aggressive sense: "Nobody can be certain about anything, so I'm just not going to commit myself either way." This is the position of the permanent agnostic. But however sensible their stance may seem on the surface, problems appear when we look a little deeper.

Let's look at the situation logically. Either there is a God, or there isn't. One or the other. To the question, "Are you married?", the answers, "Yes" or "No" are the only two options. "Possibly" is not an answer. The atheist could be right; those who believe in God could be right. The agnostic is bound to be wrong.

Some, like yourself, consider their agnosticism to be intellectually superior to simple Christianity, as if by sitting on the fence they can enjoy the best of both worlds. But being a fence-sitter can be fatal.
Imagine for a moment that you are drowning at sea, and two boats arrive to rescue you. They come just as you are going down for the third time. You know that one of the boats has a bomb on it and will explode within minutes, but you don't know which. Because you know only one of the boats can be trusted, you choose to stay in the 'safety' of the water. Sure enough, one of the boats blows up and sinks like a stone, and the other sails off to the harbour. You drown.
So yes, you were right about only one boat being safe. Well done. But you were wrong about your decision to stay in the water. This option was 100% doomed to failure from the start. At least on one of the boats you had a 50/50 chance of success. An agnostic is in the same position. Permanently ignoring the only two options, he is condemned to making the wrong choice. Far from being a superior position to hold, it turns out to be the worst of all possible positions.

And there's more. Many people today reach out for a power beyond themselves. How many of us have half-breathed a prayer to God in the middle of a crisis? The atheist will tell you not to waste your breath - the heavens are empty; grit your teeth and get on with life. The Christian will say that help is available from a loving God. The agnostic can offer nothing but confusion and doubt.
It's as if you are taking your desperately ill friend to a hospital in a new town. "Where's the hospital?", you ask anxiously of passers-by. If someone tells you there isn't one, you are upset, but resigned to the fact that there's nothing more you can do. If someone tells you there is a hospital and where it is, you race there thankfully to get help for your friend. If someone tells you there may well be a hospital, but they've never heard of it nor do they know where it is if there is one - this is ridiculously frustrating. A glimmer of hope, but no way to reach it. Thanks for nothing.

You can now clearly see that this 'not knowing' is as far from 'common sense' as can be, and isn't half as clever as it's made out to be either. As a point on the road to discovery, it's a perfectly sensible state of mind to be in. I was also in this state of mind for most of my childhood life. But as a settled, conclusive opinion, it's wrong, dangerous and no help to anyone.
 7 years ago '04        #160
persuazion 2 heat pts
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 CuZzA said:
I became a Christian when I was 17.



My entire family are all atheists/agnostics.



Sure, but you might want to research first though. Have you even read the whole thread? Or just come in here with an uninformed, ignorant opinion? Read everything I've said, and come back and tell me you've got to just 'pick a religion out the hat and hope it's the correct one'.



Christians only a.ssume because of the Bible, and it's scary to think you have no idea how historically, factually, theologically, archaeologically reliable the Bible is. Also, you won't be sent to hell because you don't believe the same thing as we do, you're sent to hell for not believing in God. What makes you think you can choose not to live with God in this life, then choose to be with Him in the next life? God doesn't send you to hell. You do.



Because it works? Look at the society in which you live now and tell me it works. All you have to do is look back on the last page as proof that society no longer works.



Common sense? You do realise that atheism is also a statement of faith, and agnosticism is doomed to complete failure right? Like I said earlier in the thread (if you'd have been bothered to read):



See what I mean? You talk about common sense, but it's your lack of it which is making you, and others, look continually stupid.

In terms of agnosticism, an agnostic is someone who says that they don't know whether there is a God or not. Perhaps there is, perhaps there isn't. People often spend quite a long time in this state of 'not knowing' as they struggle to find out about God. Anyone who is genuinely unsure must have our respect.
But sometimes people are agnostic in a more aggressive sense: "Nobody can be certain about anything, so I'm just not going to commit myself either way." This is the position of the permanent agnostic. But however sensible their stance may seem on the surface, problems appear when we look a little deeper.

Let's look at the situation logically. Either there is a God, or there isn't. One or the other. To the question, "Are you married?", the answers, "Yes" or "No" are the only two options. "Possibly" is not an answer. The atheist could be right; those who believe in God could be right. The agnostic is bound to be wrong.

Some, like yourself, consider their agnosticism to be intellectually superior to simple Christianity, as if by sitting on the fence they can enjoy the best of both worlds. But being a fence-sitter can be fatal.
Imagine for a moment that you are drowning at sea, and two boats arrive to rescue you. They come just as you are going down for the third time. You know that one of the boats has a bomb on it and will explode within minutes, but you don't know which. Because you know only one of the boats can be trusted, you choose to stay in the 'safety' of the water. Sure enough, one of the boats blows up and sinks like a stone, and the other sails off to the harbour. You drown.
So yes, you were right about only one boat being safe. Well done. But you were wrong about your decision to stay in the water. This option was 100% doomed to failure from the start. At least on one of the boats you had a 50/50 chance of success. An agnostic is in the same position. Permanently ignoring the only two options, he is condemned to making the wrong choice. Far from being a superior position to hold, it turns out to be the worst of all possible positions.

And there's more. Many people today reach out for a power beyond themselves. How many of us have half-breathed a prayer to God in the middle of a crisis? The atheist will tell you not to waste your breath - the heavens are empty; grit your teeth and get on with life. The Christian will say that help is available from a loving God. The agnostic can offer nothing but confusion and doubt.
It's as if you are taking your desperately ill friend to a hospital in a new town. "Where's the hospital?", you ask anxiously of passers-by. If someone tells you there isn't one, you are upset, but resigned to the fact that there's nothing more you can do. If someone tells you there is a hospital and where it is, you race there thankfully to get help for your friend. If someone tells you there may well be a hospital, but they've never heard of it nor do they know where it is if there is one - this is ridiculously frustrating. A glimmer of hope, but no way to reach it. Thanks for nothing.

You can now clearly see that this 'not knowing' is as far from 'common sense' as can be, and isn't half as clever as it's made out to be either. As a point on the road to discovery, it's a perfectly sensible state of mind to be in. I was also in this state of mind for most of my childhood life. But as a settled, conclusive opinion, it's wrong, dangerous and no help to anyone.
So your family was actually on the right path and you chose out of nowhere to believe in one of the many stories on how the universe was created and take it as fact? You should have went with Scientology.....at least their story is more entertaining. The Bible is not a history book and should not be thought of as so.....if anything its just a book put there to try and control society in its primitive years....if we really went by the stuff in the bible parents would be stoning their kids out in the street right now. "Because it works"? Look at Sweden who has a large Atheist population....are they running around raping and murdering people at alarming rates?No.....because you are already installed with some sort of right and wrong values. You dont need a book written by 40 people that has changed countless times throughout history.....and you dont need an invisible man in the sky to tell you its wrong to r*pe and k!ll. If you do need that then you need some sort of counseling and not religion.Sure there is no proof that there is no God but the burden on proof in on the believer.
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