This s**t is Serious. Traces of Lead and Arsenic in Protien Shakes

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 8 years ago '06        #1
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uceosilver 
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This s**t is Serious. Traces of Lead and Arsenic in Protien Shakes
 

 
Consumer Reports Investigation: Tests Revel Contaminants In Many Protein Drinks :sick:

Unclear Labeling May Lead To Excessive Protein Consumption Which Can Pose Health Problems


YONKERS, NY A new investigation by Consumer Reports, including tests at an outside lab of 15 protein drinks, reveals that some protein drinks may pose health problems over time, especially at a consumption level of three or more servings a day, due to the potential to consume harmful heavy metals and excessive protein. All of the protein drinks tested by Consumer Reports had at least one sample containing one or more of the following contaminants: arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury, which can have toxic effects on the body, including several organs. The report is available in the July issue of Consumer Reports and online at
[pic - click to view]

 www.ConsumerReports.org.

The products, sold as ready-to-drink liquids or powders that are mixed with milk, juice or water to make shakes, attract not just athletes, but also baby boomers, pregnant women, and teenagers looking for a shortcut to a buff body. For most of the drinks tested by Consumer Reports, levels of contaminants detected were in the low to moderate range, but levels in three of the products were of particular concern because consumers who have three servings daily could be exposed to levels of arsenic, cadmium or lead that exceed the maximum limits for one or two of those contaminants in dietary supplements proposed by the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP).

The USP is the federally recognized authority that sets voluntary standards for health products. Federal regulations do not generally require that protein drinks and other dietary supplements be tested before they are sold to ensure that theyre safe, effective, and free of contaminants, as the rules require for prescription drugs. We need better government oversight and regulation of this product sector, as well as better quality control practices in manufacturing. Especially for consumers who are using these products regularly-- consuming two or three or more times a day-- there should be better safeguards to ensure the safety of these protein drinks, said Urvashi Rangan, PhD., director of technical policy, Consumer Reports.

Proposition 65, a California State law, mandates that manufacturers notify consumers when products contain toxic substances at levels the state says pose even a low cancer or reproductive risk. Eight of the fifteen protein drinks tested by Consumer Reports fall into this category due to their elevated levels of lead. Those products should be required to carry a warning label if they were sold in California, said Rangan.

Consuming excess protein can also cause health problems. Teenagers who want to look like the sculpted images they see in fitness magazines are especially vulnerable to the marketing messages trumpeted by the makers of protein drinks. Enticed by the promise of hope in a can, teenagers tend to overuse the products, a.ssuming that if one scoop is good, then four to five would be even better. A 2005 study published by the American Academy of Pediatrics found that protein powders and shakes were the supplements most commonly used by those aged 12 to 18. Pregnant women are also vulnerable because heavy metals can pose risks to a developing fetus or a nursing baby. Some protein drinks market directly to these groups while others warn they are not suitable for people under 18 years of age or that pregnant women should consult a physician before use.

What The Tests Found

Consumer Reports purchased 15 protein powders and drinks mainly in the New York metro area or online and tested multiple samples of each for arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury. The levels discussed here are based on three servings per day, an amount that experts say is common. The results showed a considerable range, but levels in three products were of particular concern:

Three daily servings of the ready-to-drink liquid EAS Myoplex Original Rich Dark Chocolate Shake provide an average of 16.9 micrograms (g) of arsenic, exceeding the proposed USP limit of 15 g per day and an average of 5.1 g of cadmium, which is just above the USP limit of 5 g per day.

The samples of Muscle Milk Chocolate powder contained all four heavy metals, and levels of three metals in the product were among the highest of all products tested by Consumer Reports. Average cadmium levels of 5.6 g in three daily servings exceeded the USP limit of 5 g per day, and the average lead level of 13.5 g also topped the USP limit of 10 g per day. The average arsenic level of 12.2 g was approaching the USP limit of 15 g per day.

Muscle Milk Vanilla Crme contained 12.2 g of lead in three daily servings, exceeding the lead limits, and 11.2 g of arsenic.

The Consumer Reports investigation notes that cadmium raises special concern because it accumulates in and can damage the kidneys, the same organs that can be damaged by excessive protein consumption. And it can take 20 years for the body to eliminate even half the cadmium absorbed today.

How much protein?

Only one of the products tested by Consumer Reports, Six Star Muscle Professional Strength Whey Protein, specifies a maximum daily intake. Others use vague language that could encourage a high level of consumption. Consuming excess protein can also pose health problems, including diarrhea. Although protein is needed for bone development, excessive protein over the long term might also cause calcium to be excreted from the bones, increasing the risk of osteoporosis. And for diabetics or others with kidney problems, it can lead to further complications.

The Consumer Reports investigation notes that consumers can roughly calculate how many grams of protein they need by multiplying their body weight by .4. For athletes, the general rule of thumb is about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight per day. The report provides several examples of better, cheaper ways to bulk up. Case in point: a sandwich with three ounces of chicken and an eight ounce glass of whole milk provides about 40 grams of protein, which is more than half the 72 grams needed by a 180-pound person and most of the 48 grams required by someone weighing 120 pounds.

Disclaimer: The Google Translation that has been added to pages within the Pendleton-Gazette was done solely as a tool to help those who speak other languages. It is not guaranteed to be 100% full prove (accurate) when a translation is performed because of sentence structures in languages other than English do vary.

All Comments are moderated.


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 Consumer Reports Investigation: Tests Revel Contaminants In Many Protein Drinks

51 comments for "This s**t is Serious. Traces of Lead and Arsenic in Protien Shakes"

 8 years ago '05        #2
youngvito18 8 heat pts
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never used Muscle Milk i buy Optimum Nutrition 100% Whey protein powder
 8 years ago '04        #3
TheMagicMan|M 2 heat pts
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 uceosilver said:
Consumer Reports Investigation: Tests Revel Contaminants In Many Protein Drinks :sick:

Unclear Labeling May Lead To Excessive Protein Consumption Which Can Pose Health Problems


YONKERS, NY A new investigation by Consumer Reports, including tests at an outside lab of 15 protein drinks, reveals that some protein drinks may pose health problems over time, especially at a consumption level of three or more servings a day, due to the potential to consume harmful heavy metals and excessive protein. All of the protein drinks tested by Consumer Reports had at least one sample containing one or more of the following contaminants: arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury, which can have toxic effects on the body, including several organs. The report is available in the July issue of Consumer Reports and online at .

The products, sold as ready-to-drink liquids or powders that are mixed with milk, juice or water to make shakes, attract not just athletes, but also baby boomers, pregnant women, and teenagers looking for a shortcut to a buff body. For most of the drinks tested by Consumer Reports, levels of contaminants detected were in the low to moderate range, but levels in three of the products were of particular concern because consumers who have three servings daily could be exposed to levels of arsenic, cadmium or lead that exceed the maximum limits for one or two of those contaminants in dietary supplements proposed by the U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP).

Did they only test the Pre-Mixed drinks? Seems like that was probably the problem right there. Who knows what type of milk / water / juice they are using, s**t could come from a well somewhere for all we know.

Don't buy your drinks pre-mixed
 8 years ago '05        #4
MadGam325 14 heat pts14
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Bye bye muscle milk.
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 8 years ago '09        #5
NcAlien 2 heat pts
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Did they test only pre-mixed drinks or powder because im on muscle milk now..... :sadcam:
 06-01-2010, 10:32 AM         #6
Brassmonkey3333 
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 TheMagicMan said:
Did they only test the Pre-Mixed drinks? Seems like that was probably the problem right there. Who knows what type of milk / water / juice they are using, s**t could come from a well somewhere for all we know.

Don't buy your drinks pre-mixed
look at what u bolded. it says or powder.. they tested muscle milk, it was one of the worst.

edit..."The samples of Muscle Milk Chocolate powder contained all four heavy metals, and levels of three metals in the product were among the highest of all products tested by Consumer Reports. Average cadmium levels of 5.6 g in three daily servings exceeded the USP limit of 5 g per day, and the average lead level of 13.5 g also topped the USP limit of 10 g per day. The average arsenic level of 12.2 g was approaching the USP limit of 15 g per day.


Last edited by Brassmonkey3333; 06-01-2010 at 10:33 AM..
 06-01-2010, 03:14 PM         #7
StatisticZ 
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Did I miss a list with all the ones? lol.
 8 years ago '04        #8
patt24 52 heat pts52
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is there a full list of proteins they tested?
 8 years ago '04        #9
enetblazin4eva 4 heat pts
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 StatisticZ said:
Did I miss a list with all the ones? lol.
I didn't see a list anywhere but it seems like all the "mainstream" companies that you would find if you walked into any supplement store.
 8 years ago '04        #10
TheMagicMan|M 2 heat pts
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 Brassmonkey3333 said:
look at what u bolded. it says or powder.. they tested muscle milk, it was one of the worst.

edit..."The samples of Muscle Milk Chocolate powder contained all four heavy metals, and levels of three metals in the product were among the highest of all products tested by Consumer Reports. Average cadmium levels of 5.6 g in three daily servings exceeded the USP limit of 5 g per day, and the average lead level of 13.5 g also topped the USP limit of 10 g per day. The average arsenic level of 12.2 g was approaching the USP limit of 15 g per day.
yeah, my bad, I missed the "or" when i read it this morning...
 8 years ago '09        #11
Vincent_Chase 27 heat pts27
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Labrada Pro V60>
 8 years ago '04        #12
TheMagicMan|M 2 heat pts
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here is the list of what was tested


[pic - click to view]



paste the link in your browser since bx resizes the photo...
 8 years ago '06        #13
niceguy954 31 heat pts31
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 MPLSallstar said:
f**k... so the one's that aren't bolded means they are safe to use??? There is an amount we can have per day, I take it?? That s**t doesn't sound safe. lol
i use the 100% why protein..its one of the lowest on that list and i use it at most twice daily..so i think im pretty good
 8 years ago '04        #14
TheMagicMan|M 2 heat pts
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after reading the report, there are some things they point out that are just flat out wrong...


Basically what I took away from it is what I've known for the last 5 years

1. You should be getting the majority of your protein from actual food
2. The supplement industry needs to be regulated

#2 is going to have more repercussions than people think...it's never good when the government steps into an industry that it knows nothing about. Worst case scenario, you'll need a prescription for a N.O. supp, Creatine and Whey
 8 years ago '04        #15
TheMagicMan|M 2 heat pts
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Oh, and in the article, there are stories about people taking enough shakes to get to 300 grams of protein a day, which makes me think the article was written with the idea that all people who take protein are taking it to an extreme like this...


If you are getting no more than 50 grams from powders, you should be fine, the article points out cases of people who use the shakes instead of eating. Pre WO and PWO is about all you really need protein supps for. The rest of the time, grab some f**king food.


Last edited by TheMagicMan; 06-01-2010 at 05:47 PM..
 8 years ago '04        #16
TheMagicMan|M 2 heat pts
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another link that includes part of the article (the part about dude taking more than 3 shakes to get over 300 grams of protein )
 8 years ago '05        #17
youngvito18 8 heat pts
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 niceguy954 said:
i use the 100% why protein..its one of the lowest on that list and i use it at most twice daily..so i think im pretty good
yeah, does it mean the products lower on the list are safer to use
 06-01-2010, 07:40 PM         #18
tech5c 
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Who are these "experts" that say 3 servings is common.

The highest arsenic content is 16.9 micrograms. The intake for an average person is between 20 and 300 micrograms/day. For an average adult, 150 lbs., a toxic dose is 42 mg. You would have to drink ~2500 EAS protein shakes to obtain a toxic dose.

Even something like Fiji water contains 7 micrograms/liter of arsenic.
 8 years ago '09        #19
ill 800 64 heat pts64
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yet another reason why i dont use supplements.
 8 years ago '06        #20
uceosilver  OP
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Let me jus say this, anyone that sees this and dont want to at least consider completely stopping is destroying themselves. I personally have been using this s**t for 3-4 years and I am never using a protien shake again. I used it extensively when i was studying for my MCATs for med school and I really gained muscle mass because of it. but i will stop using it. I used cytogainer and muscle milk. Yes the heavy metal content is only in trace amounts but if u understand biology a lot of the long term effects caused by these things is a result of accumulation of the substances over long periods of time. It takes a while for the body to dispose of heavy metals, and they can have an effect on your cells in whatever time period that is. And this applies to all shakes. I dont know if anyone has every isolated milk protien in chem class in college but i know that there is a heavy metal ion test used to test if the product is protien. here is a link to how the test works, its an orgo experiment on a webpage. might be a lil hard to understand for some: but its explained there. and it lists the metals lead(Pb), cadminum(cd), and mercury(Hg) among others. This may be where the traces come from. jus sayin. but any amount of lead or any heavy metal is no good whether it k!lls u immediately or not. My advice: eat more chikin.
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