God of War III

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 8 years ago '04        #41
Da Ill One|M 4602 heat pts4602
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$45,508 | Props total: 4990 4990

[pic - click to view]




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God of War III Interview: We talk to the game's director Stig Asmussen to learn new details about one of 2010's biggest games. For the full story, be sure to check out the December 2009 issue of GamePro, which features an exclusive God of War III cover story loaded with new info!

God of War III's director Stig Asmussen recently talked with us about some of the colossal challenges his team faced when bringing Sony's flagship action franchise to the PlayStation 3.

In this exclusive interview with GamePro, which is part of our December 2009 God of War III cover story, Asmussen also discusses future downloadable GoW III content, why multiplayer won't work in a God of War game, and how the team is still thinking about adding Sixaxis support. Read on for the full interview, plus some exclusive screens and artwork for God of War III.

GamePro: There are extraordinarily high expectations for God of War III. The series is coming to a new platform and it's been over two years since God of War II. Do you think you've reached the level of polish that God of War fans expect? Do you feel like you're finally there?

Stig Asmussen: In theory, yes, I definitely think we've reached that. In practice, no, I think we have a lot of work left to do to get there.

Both of those games, God of War and God of War II, had an incredibly high level of polish. Everyone understood how much setup we had and what worked in the fiction of the games. We all have to get everything done to make sure everything falls into place with God of War III.

And if it does, we'll be in really good shape to offer an experience that's as good as, if not better than the previous games. If not, well, everyone will be unhappy.


GP: What was the biggest challenge that came up during the development of God of War III?

Stig: Well, the biggest challenge is the complexity of everything. Many things that we're trying to do in the game crosses multiple departments. What we used to be able to do was get three or four guys in a room, saying "This is what we're trying to achieve here," and pretty much rest a.ssured that those guys would be able to go off and make that happen.

Now, the technology is so complicated, and the level of detail that's expected is so high and intricate, it crosses multiple departments. So, something that used to take three to four months takes twenty, twenty-five, forty, or even fifty, and requires a level of communication and management that is incredibly complicated.

It could be incredibly small, something you see in the game, like the "Helios Head Rip" for example. That probably involved 15 people to get that one thing done. It took multiple iterations. A lot of that was the process of just learning how to do that, and getting the technology right. And a lot of that process was making sure that the proper communication happened between all those teams of people.


[pic - click to view]



GP: Do you feel pressure to show some restraint when determining the amount of gore to put in God of War III? How do you know how far to push the overall level of violence?

Stig: Well, I think that with the lightning quick k!lls, that's something that's part of Kratos's character. We have an opportunity on the PlayStation 3 to make those things really come across.

But we've got to be careful because we're treading a fine line, and we want to keep falling into that canonical realm. We always have to make sure that we keep it real personal and in the fiction of the game. When we have these discussions in these meetings about how we execute some of these gory moments, it tends to always get to the point when we're laughing about stuff, and I think once we're laughing, we've probably pushed it too far. [Laughs]


GP: The demand for providing some sort of multiplayer in games has grown tremendously over the years. Even franchises like Resident Evil, known predominantly for their single-player content, have integrated multiplayer support to satisfy this demand. Have you guys played at all with the possibility of including a multiplayer mode in God of War III, maybe with co-op? Or is that something that just doesn't fit?

Stig: Well, why don't I ask you a question? How did it work in Resident Evil 5? Do you think it was better, or do you think they should have stuck to a single-player game?

GP: Well, I thought it took away from the terror, because it's a survival-horror game, and you're supposed to have this overwhelming feeling that your life is on the line. When you have another player who's able to a.ssist you every time you run out of health; that takes away from how scary the game is.

Stig: Hmm, that kind of sets me up for my response, then. I'm a huge Resident Evil fan, but I got two hours into Resident Evil 5, and I wasn't playing multiplayer, either. I stopped playing, which I've never done before. Previously, I've beaten them all. With God of War III, there's a story we want to tell and an experience we want to deliver, and multiplayer doesn't fit into that.

Does that mean we don't have conversations about multiplayer? No. Of course we have conversations about multiplayer, and there's a lot of things we think about.

Imagine two Kratos characters running around at the same time. Once you do that, the story becomes something more about an experience between two players and less about something that we're scripting.

So, you have something like Left 4 Dead, which is sweet, but we just decided with this game, there's a certain way that we want to tell it. And staying with what we've done in the past, we want to complete the story in a way that was familiar to everybody.

GP: The challenge rooms have appeared in all the other God of War games and (assuming they'll be in God of War III) have they evolved in any way? Are you doing something different with them for GoW III?

Stig: OK, we'll talk about online, which is one of the things we discussed earlier. It would make a lot of sense to be able to download them. That's something we might see in the future. So, maybe you'll see the game ship with a certain amount of challenges on it, then later on, we might put a download pack out with new challenges. It's a good way to keep the series going.

We have different enemy types to work with, and the enemies do a lot of different things. Challenges are usually based off mechanics that are built in the game, so all the new mechanics will allow us to do different challenges.

For example, now that you have creatures you can ride, maybe we'll put in a challenge where in a certain amount of time you have to get on a Cyclops and k!ll a certain number of enemies in a certain amount of time. Or, maybe you have to use the Cyclops to get through a certain type of hazard or area or something like that.

So, the new game mechanics are what allow us to create new challenges. Those are something that we usually do really late in development, and we haven't even started on the challenges yet.

There are some ideas in people's heads and other ideas on paper. It'll be interesting to see what we come up with in the next two months.


[pic - click to view]



GP: How long is it going to take to complete God of War III? Is it a longer experience than previous GoW games?

Stig: That's tough to answer because we're still tuning it. I think it's safe to say the game should fall in between 10 or 20 hours, depending on how good of a gamer you are. If you're pretty hardcore, you can do it in 10, and if you're very, very casual, you can do it 20.


GP: As far as the large-scale puzzles in God of War III, do you foresee that these will add a bit more play time to the game?

Stig: Hmm, not that much. If you try to find all the secrets and stuff, you might add another 20 percent on top of it.

Most of that stuff is going to come from the first run. I think people are going to be pretty driven by what their task is at hand. God of War III is a very linear game. It's always been a very linear game; so don't expect branching paths or RPG elements or side-quests or anything like that.


GP: Was there anything you had in development really early that you had to change or get rid of all together when making God of War III?

Stig: Uh, everything? [Laughs.] Definitely the Titans stuff, it took tons of iterations, and until we launch the game, we won't have it down to a science. But we have a system down where it's definitely going to be worth it.

A lot of things depend on how we "play test". We get people in the room to play the game and if they don't get it, but it makes complete sense to us, we have to adjust it and play test it again.

But, I can't think of anything in particular that we're still spinning our wheels on. To a certain extent, everything you try is a new process, especially when you try it with new hardware. These are things you take for granted and have to be done a bunch of different ways.

GP: With God of War III, it looks like you guys have really bridged the gap between cinematics and the in-game graphics. In the past these have looked drastically different from one another. Now it's almost not even noticeable. Are there any pre-rendered scenes in the game anymore?

Stig: That's something that we've always strived to get better and better at. I think God of War II did it much better than God of War, and the original did that really well for a game of its time.

One of the issues that you're constantly dealing with is that you have things running in the game's engine, a.ssets running as an MPEG, and then you've got the high-resolution footage. Bridging the gap between them, it always creates a whole new series of problems. In God of War II, we could never get the quality of compression for the high-res a.ssets or the in-game a.ssets to match those same in-game a.ssets.

Plus, they don't run at 60 frames per second, they run at 30. So, even if you got the compression completely dialed in, your eyes will still notice the subtle change.

And then you have the high-res stuff, beautiful high-res cinematics, that we have in the first game. We looked at those and said "we think we can do this, or do better than this, in-game." And if you look at the trailer we put out, with the Titans scaling Olympus, that's all in-game footage, and it looks better than the high-res cinematics we did in God of War II. So, we achieved that.

The other part of the problem is sometimes you have to make sets so big, there's no way you could render it in-game. You'd still have the MPEG issue where you'd have to use extra memory to render out these massive, massive scenes.

In those cases, we'd create our own custom compression editor that works with the PlayStation 3, and it works really well with the scenes we're showing in God of War III, where you can't tell when you've gone from cutscene to gameplay. As long as the buffers are all set up properly, they all work great.


GP: Is it more of a blessing or a curse to be working on the PlayStation 3? It's an awesome platform, but there's got to be some huge challenges too, right?

Stig: Well, the tough thing about going to the next generation is that you never really know what the hardware will do until it ships.

You're pretty much ironing out problems until that day, and we're still doing that. But the good thing is that we already had all of our gameplay code from the first two games.

We just enhanced it and built stuff on top of it. We hit the ground running in terms of setting up level design and everything like that. But we had to theorize what the technology was going to do later on down the road. For the most part, it's worked the way we wanted it to.


GP: One of the things you guys eliminated at some point in the development process was the Sixaxis support. Are you completely done with it?

Stig: No.

GP: Oh, really?

Stig: We're not currently using it, but that doesn't mean we won't get something in there by the time it ships. I can see a lot of different uses for it.

We're trying to get everything done with God of War III first. But that's something that I would like to use if it feels really good. There's no reason why we can't include pulling off quick yanking motions. Not anything like getting on a balance beam or something like that. [Laughs.]

Also, I don't want to do precision control. It doesn't really suit the game or the kind of things you would expect Kratos to do. For example, when you're ripping off Helios's head, maybe you can shake his head violently with the Sixaxis... if you choose to do that.

Source:


Last edited by Da Ill One; 01-13-2010 at 12:30 PM..
 8 years ago '04        #42
Eminem313 2 heat pts OP
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Wow I remember this thread, thanks for bringing it back, I will keep all information I know of in here.

Also it looks like whatever footage SONY was going to show on Monday has been pulled and now they are just going to be releasing screen shots and new interviews.....
 8 years ago '04        #43
Eminem313 2 heat pts OP
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$813 | Props total: 0 0
 Da Ill One said:

[pic - click to view]




[pic - click to view]



God of War III Interview: We talk to the game's director Stig Asmussen to learn new details about one of 2010's biggest games. For the full story, be sure to check out the December 2009 issue of GamePro, which features an exclusive God of War III cover story loaded with new info!

God of War III's director Stig Asmussen recently talked with us about some of the colossal challenges his team faced when bringing Sony's flagship action franchise to the PlayStation 3.

In this exclusive interview with GamePro, which is part of our December 2009 God of War III cover story, Asmussen also discusses future downloadable GoW III content, why multiplayer won't work in a God of War game, and how the team is still thinking about adding Sixaxis support. Read on for the full interview, plus some exclusive screens and artwork for God of War III.

GamePro: There are extraordinarily high expectations for God of War III. The series is coming to a new platform and it's been over two years since God of War II. Do you think you've reached the level of polish that God of War fans expect? Do you feel like you're finally there?

Stig Asmussen: In theory, yes, I definitely think we've reached that. In practice, no, I think we have a lot of work left to do to get there.

Both of those games, God of War and God of War II, had an incredibly high level of polish. Everyone understood how much setup we had and what worked in the fiction of the games. We all have to get everything done to make sure everything falls into place with God of War III.

And if it does, we'll be in really good shape to offer an experience that's as good as, if not better than the previous games. If not, well, everyone will be unhappy.


GP: What was the biggest challenge that came up during the development of God of War III?

Stig: Well, the biggest challenge is the complexity of everything. Many things that we're trying to do in the game crosses multiple departments. What we used to be able to do was get three or four guys in a room, saying "This is what we're trying to achieve here," and pretty much rest a.ssured that those guys would be able to go off and make that happen.

Now, the technology is so complicated, and the level of detail that's expected is so high and intricate, it crosses multiple departments. So, something that used to take three to four months takes twenty, twenty-five, forty, or even fifty, and requires a level of communication and management that is incredibly complicated.

It could be incredibly small, something you see in the game, like the "Helios Head Rip" for example. That probably involved 15 people to get that one thing done. It took multiple iterations. A lot of that was the process of just learning how to do that, and getting the technology right. And a lot of that process was making sure that the proper communication happened between all those teams of people.


[pic - click to view]



GP: Do you feel pressure to show some restraint when determining the amount of gore to put in God of War III? How do you know how far to push the overall level of violence?

Stig: Well, I think that with the lightning quick k!lls, that's something that's part of Kratos's character. We have an opportunity on the PlayStation 3 to make those things really come across.

But we've got to be careful because we're treading a fine line, and we want to keep falling into that canonical realm. We always have to make sure that we keep it real personal and in the fiction of the game. When we have these discussions in these meetings about how we execute some of these gory moments, it tends to always get to the point when we're laughing about stuff, and I think once we're laughing, we've probably pushed it too far. [Laughs]


GP: The demand for providing some sort of multiplayer in games has grown tremendously over the years. Even franchises like Resident Evil, known predominantly for their single-player content, have integrated multiplayer support to satisfy this demand. Have you guys played at all with the possibility of including a multiplayer mode in God of War III, maybe with co-op? Or is that something that just doesn't fit?

Stig: Well, why don't I ask you a question? How did it work in Resident Evil 5? Do you think it was better, or do you think they should have stuck to a single-player game?

GP: Well, I thought it took away from the terror, because it's a survival-horror game, and you're supposed to have this overwhelming feeling that your life is on the line. When you have another player who's able to a.ssist you every time you run out of health; that takes away from how scary the game is.

Stig: Hmm, that kind of sets me up for my response, then. I'm a huge Resident Evil fan, but I got two hours into Resident Evil 5, and I wasn't playing multiplayer, either. I stopped playing, which I've never done before. Previously, I've beaten them all. With God of War III, there's a story we want to tell and an experience we want to deliver, and multiplayer doesn't fit into that.

Does that mean we don't have conversations about multiplayer? No. Of course we have conversations about multiplayer, and there's a lot of things we think about.

Imagine two Kratos characters running around at the same time. Once you do that, the story becomes something more about an experience between two players and less about something that we're scripting.

So, you have something like Left 4 Dead, which is sweet, but we just decided with this game, there's a certain way that we want to tell it. And staying with what we've done in the past, we want to complete the story in a way that was familiar to everybody.

GP: The challenge rooms have appeared in all the other God of War games and (assuming they'll be in God of War III) have they evolved in any way? Are you doing something different with them for GoW III?

Stig: OK, we'll talk about online, which is one of the things we discussed earlier. It would make a lot of sense to be able to download them. That's something we might see in the future. So, maybe you'll see the game ship with a certain amount of challenges on it, then later on, we might put a download pack out with new challenges. It's a good way to keep the series going.

We have different enemy types to work with, and the enemies do a lot of different things. Challenges are usually based off mechanics that are built in the game, so all the new mechanics will allow us to do different challenges.

For example, now that you have creatures you can ride, maybe we'll put in a challenge where in a certain amount of time you have to get on a Cyclops and k!ll a certain number of enemies in a certain amount of time. Or, maybe you have to use the Cyclops to get through a certain type of hazard or area or something like that.

So, the new game mechanics are what allow us to create new challenges. Those are something that we usually do really late in development, and we haven't even started on the challenges yet.

There are some ideas in people's heads and other ideas on paper. It'll be interesting to see what we come up with in the next two months.


[pic - click to view]



GP: How long is it going to take to complete God of War III? Is it a longer experience than previous GoW games?

Stig: That's tough to answer because we're still tuning it. I think it's safe to say the game should fall in between 10 or 20 hours, depending on how good of a gamer you are. If you're pretty hardcore, you can do it in 10, and if you're very, very casual, you can do it 20.


GP: As far as the large-scale puzzles in God of War III, do you foresee that these will add a bit more play time to the game?

Stig: Hmm, not that much. If you try to find all the secrets and stuff, you might add another 20 percent on top of it.

Most of that stuff is going to come from the first run. I think people are going to be pretty driven by what their task is at hand. God of War III is a very linear game. It's always been a very linear game; so don't expect branching paths or RPG elements or side-quests or anything like that.


GP: Was there anything you had in development really early that you had to change or get rid of all together when making God of War III?

Stig: Uh, everything? [Laughs.] Definitely the Titans stuff, it took tons of iterations, and until we launch the game, we won't have it down to a science. But we have a system down where it's definitely going to be worth it.

A lot of things depend on how we "play test". We get people in the room to play the game and if they don't get it, but it makes complete sense to us, we have to adjust it and play test it again.

But, I can't think of anything in particular that we're still spinning our wheels on. To a certain extent, everything you try is a new process, especially when you try it with new hardware. These are things you take for granted and have to be done a bunch of different ways.

GP: With God of War III, it looks like you guys have really bridged the gap between cinematics and the in-game graphics. In the past these have looked drastically different from one another. Now it's almost not even noticeable. Are there any pre-rendered scenes in the game anymore?

Stig: That's something that we've always strived to get better and better at. I think God of War II did it much better than God of War, and the original did that really well for a game of its time.

One of the issues that you're constantly dealing with is that you have things running in the game's engine, a.ssets running as an MPEG, and then you've got the high-resolution footage. Bridging the gap between them, it always creates a whole new series of problems. In God of War II, we could never get the quality of compression for the high-res a.ssets or the in-game a.ssets to match those same in-game a.ssets.

Plus, they don't run at 60 frames per second, they run at 30. So, even if you got the compression completely dialed in, your eyes will still notice the subtle change.

And then you have the high-res stuff, beautiful high-res cinematics, that we have in the first game. We looked at those and said "we think we can do this, or do better than this, in-game." And if you look at the trailer we put out, with the Titans scaling Olympus, that's all in-game footage, and it looks better than the high-res cinematics we did in God of War II. So, we achieved that.

The other part of the problem is sometimes you have to make sets so big, there's no way you could render it in-game. You'd still have the MPEG issue where you'd have to use extra memory to render out these massive, massive scenes.

In those cases, we'd create our own custom compression editor that works with the PlayStation 3, and it works really well with the scenes we're showing in God of War III, where you can't tell when you've gone from cutscene to gameplay. As long as the buffers are all set up properly, they all work great.


GP: Is it more of a blessing or a curse to be working on the PlayStation 3? It's an awesome platform, but there's got to be some huge challenges too, right?

Stig: Well, the tough thing about going to the next generation is that you never really know what the hardware will do until it ships.

You're pretty much ironing out problems until that day, and we're still doing that. But the good thing is that we already had all of our gameplay code from the first two games.

We just enhanced it and built stuff on top of it. We hit the ground running in terms of setting up level design and everything like that. But we had to theorize what the technology was going to do later on down the road. For the most part, it's worked the way we wanted it to.


GP: One of the things you guys eliminated at some point in the development process was the Sixaxis support. Are you completely done with it?

Stig: No.

GP: Oh, really?

Stig: We're not currently using it, but that doesn't mean we won't get something in there by the time it ships. I can see a lot of different uses for it.

We're trying to get everything done with God of War III first. But that's something that I would like to use if it feels really good. There's no reason why we can't include pulling off quick yanking motions. Not anything like getting on a balance beam or something like that. [Laughs.]

Also, I don't want to do precision control. It doesn't really suit the game or the kind of things you would expect Kratos to do. For example, when you're ripping off Helios's head, maybe you can shake his head violently with the Sixaxis... if you choose to do that.

Source:
This is really old, I actually posted this months ago..........
 8 years ago '04        #44
Da Ill One|M 4602 heat pts4602
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I know when i merged the threads... For some reason the got jacked up and ended up out of order dont know why
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 8 years ago '04        #45
dog4life 1 heat pts
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about time it went official i'm expecting nothin but 10's across the boards
 8 years ago '04        #46
restless4207 
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^^ same here ive been waiting a coupel years now
 8 years ago '04        #48
Eminem313 2 heat pts OP
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[pic - click to view]

 8 years ago '05        #49
P-Hill|M 26 heat pts26
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those screenshots are f**kin GORGEOUS. It really does look like a painting come to life.
 01-15-2010, 09:17 AM         #50
TriangleOffense 
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 8 years ago '04        #51
Da Ill One|M 4602 heat pts4602
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Official US Box art released...


[pic - click to view]


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 8 years ago '04        #52
Eminem313 2 heat pts OP
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 Da Ill One said:
Official US Box art released...


[pic - click to view]


Posted via Mobile Device
Already posted, but rumor has it that is the box art of Japan...US might be different...
 8 years ago '04        #53
Eminem313 2 heat pts OP
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Source + Video Preview Here:

The God of War Ultimate Fan Contest is off to an amazing start! We’ve seen anything from our fans showing off their Kratos tattoo, best of GOW moments with Lego animated films, to just simple video submissions of why they thought Kratos was so bad a$$!!!

To further fuel your interest and excitement in having your fan video submission and name forever immortalized within God of War III Ultimate Edition, here’s a sneak peek at the official documentary God of War: Unearthing the Legend.

Hosted by American film/stage actor and historic lecturer, Peter Weller (RoboCop, Engineering an Empire) God of War: Unearthing the Legend takes the viewer through an epic journey of conquest, destiny and revenge as the detailed events of Kratos is explored and dissected by key members of the development team, Greek historians & professors.

So if you haven’t done so, be sure to take advantage of your three-day Martin Luther King weekend and get your Ultimate Fan video filmed and submitted.

The Ultimate Fan Contest officially ends on Saturday, January 23 and this will be your only chance to be forever immortalized within the God of War franchise (…and getting a free copy of God of War III Ultimate Edition signed by Santa Monica Studios doesn’t hurt either)!
 8 years ago '04        #54
Eminem313 2 heat pts OP
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Since E3 2009, God Of War 3 information has been on hiatus. Having been suitably wowed by the playable demo our anticipation for the game was already at fever pitch - especially with the imminent release of EA's multi-platform Dante's Inferno, a blatant 'homage' to the series, reminding us of the PS3 source material. But now we've got something else to get excited about....

We've just been given access to a brand new segment of gameplay showing of a boss battle of preposterous scale. The following is a scene by scene synopsis of the action viewed by our very own eyes.

(Only text and images at this stage, but these impressions come from an HD video - hopefully at some point before release we'll be able to share this with you too!)

00:01 The action starts with Kratos standing on a rocky mountain. Long shadows are cast over the rugged and wild-looking scenery as a harsh wind blows. Kratos has golden armour over one shoulder and proceeds to launch into a familiar combination attack against no enemy, just to show that this is in fact in-game.

00:10 Kratos moves away from the clearing towards a fallen tree and you can tell the player is rapidly hammering a button to move it out of the way, as you would done in GoW or GoW2. With a final push, Kratos throws the entire trunk off the side of the mountain. He looks angry.

00:19 Kratos begins to dash uphill along a wide dirt track. There are three skeletal enemies visible at the end. The wind picks up, blowing dust across the screen. The post-processing motion blur effects are superb and give the whole thing a pre-rendered appearance, even though this 100% certain it's gameplay footage.


[pic - click to view]



00:23 As fireballs burst into frame from the top-right, Kratos leaps up and spreads his Icarus wings, flying over the head of the first enemy. Flight only lasts a brief moment, before he lands a few feet behind the other two foes.


[pic - click to view]



00:26 A f!ght begins, but we're hardly paying attention to it – in the background, what can only be described as an electric, blue colossus is scaling Mount Olympus. It's not paying any attention to Kratos, who is busy tearing his foes in half, with plenty of gore as his reward.


[pic - click to view]



00:42 Kratos continues uphill towards another group of minor enemies. But before anyone can even swing a weapon, the ground erupts underneath them and a huge beast emerges. The shifting terrain folds up realistically, with jagged rocks breaking through the earth.

00:47 It's an elemental water spider with a horse's head! Of course it is. And it looks phenomenal. It thrashes around, with cascades of water splashing everywhere and rivers of water running over the surface of its body.

00:53 Kratos doesn't seem impressed at all and sets about attacking it. The spider horse delivers a Pokemon-style water attack, a torrent of water erupting from its mouth. The player seems wise to this and stays to the left, attacking its chin with basic combo attacks.


[pic - click to view]



01:03 Kratos summons a whirlwind attack that looks powerful. It's several storeys high and appears to move right through the beast's long, horsey face. Have that! The ground seems to be moving slightly and rounded rocks behind our foe are moving too. Something's odd about this scene.

01:24 The f!ght continues this way for a while, with the two trading elemental attacks. But then a deep voice seems to moan in annoyance and the ground starts to pitch. Kratos is thrown off-balance as the entire plateau revolves counter-clockwise. The spider-beast seems to be clinging on for dear life too as the camera zooms out to take in the bigger picture.


[pic - click to view]



01:26 Oh. My. God. As the camera zooms right out, we realise it wasn't a mountain at all that we were f!ghting on. It was a mountain-sized Titan Gaia – think a 20 million tonne Kathy Bates covered in grass and leaves - and we've been f!ghting on her wrist the entire time. Needless to say, the scene does its job. Spectacularly.

1:30 With Gaia wide awake, her arm is now thrown the other way up. Unperturbed by the massive drop below him, Kratos begins to monkey across what is now a grassy ceiling and continues his a.ssault on the spider-horse beast. Honestly, you'd think he would consider saving his own neck by now…


[pic - click to view]



2:01 After half a minute more of upside-down cut and thrust, the camera zooms out again and we see Gaia’s arm come round and clamp onto the side of an actual mountain (unless it's an even bigger beast – at this time we don't know what to expect any more). It speeds back in and the f!ght continues.

2:33 The biblically big-boned lady brings her head closer and examines the tiny figure attacking this tarantula-sized critter. Kratos is still throwing everything he's got at his opponent, unleashing combo after combo and following them up with his whirlwind attack.


[pic - click to view]



3:19 In a scene reminiscent of Yoda's lightsaber skills, Kratos performs a mid-air attack that looks like a Catherine Wheel. Surely the water beast can't have much vitality left. It's still thrashing at him and spitting out torrents of water in defence, but it looks like it's f!ghting a losing battle.

3:44 There it is – a big, 3D circle button icon appears above the creature's head, but looking like it's in the scene rather than overlaid on the screen. You know what time it is. It's time to finish this.

3:48 After leaping onto one of the creature's mandibles, Kratos jumps again and buries one of his blades into the creature's lower jaw. After a brief struggle, he manages to attack the other one into the other side, so he's got the creature chained by the head like an elaborately decorated (and aggressive) stunt kite.

3:56 Standing back on the ground, Kratos jerks the creature's head left and right with his chains. Something's gotta give. Sure enough, after a couple of seconds, the lower jaw comes away in its entirety, leaving the horse beast squealing in agony.

4:00 After writhing around for a bit, the defeated boss retreats into the ground, still writhing around. The camera whooshes in behind it, passing still-beautifully rendered special effects, and the God of War III logo appears.

So what did we think? Spectacular. The entire f!ght scene, from the choreography, dynamic panning camera shots to the sweeping scale is absolutely megaton.

The footage also finally gives us a tantalising look into how riding the massive Titans will work. Much like Shadow of the Colossus, Kratos’ ludicrously-sized allies are essentially constantly moving platform sections. Clambering all over Gaia looked fun as hell, so we’re mega pumped about getting our hands on these massive beasties and the rest of the game.

2010, say hello to your first potential k!ller-app.

Source:
 8 years ago '04        #56
restless4207 
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$2,713 | Props total: 14 14
omg i cannot wait for this,

just finished gow 2, almost got the plat just need to finish the challenge of the titans

cannot waiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit
 01-18-2010, 02:02 PM         #57
TriangleOffense 
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$n/a | Props total:  
fan made trailer


[video - click to view]

 8 years ago '04        #58
Eminem313 2 heat pts OP
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$813 | Props total: 0 0
 8 years ago '05        #59
Jutsu 3 heat pts
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$3,109 | Props total: 0 0
f**k i've been spoiled again
 01-19-2010, 07:01 AM         #60
KenKutaragi_v2 
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$n/a | Props total:  
Joystick "New GOW3 demo makes DI look last gen"
There were some unexpected consequences from my short time with the demo. Dante's Inferno, which was demoed at the same event, didn't look uninteresting -- it looked downright "last gen," resembling God of War Collection more than Kratos' upcoming adventure. PS3 owners would be wise to wait a month, exclusive collector's edition be damned. Kratos is back.
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