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Nov 16 - Roy Jones Steps To Fat Joe/Luda's Limit/Terror Alert Brown


 
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 11-19-2004, 11:56 PM         #76
13lack  OP
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 mista SYN said
Dammit, quit refering to latinos having black blood, that's bullshyt. Mexicans are latinos, but they don't have african roots, its a select few parts of the latino culture, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, they all have afro roots. Salsa music, prodominant in all 3 cultures is derived from the African culture. Puerto Ricans and Dominicans believe it or not, are the "******s" of the hispanic race. The latino comunity loves to down-talk us, by saying we are the ghetto and bottom feeders of the latino culture. Because they speak proper spanish and we speak ebonic spanish. Who gives a fu*k!!! Our roots are our roots, and with everyones opinions you can't take it from us. Sure, you have people dissassociating themselves with blacks. Sure there are a select few, who don't like their children dating blacks. Its like that in all cultures. See people are so fu*king close minded that if a n*gga speak spanish, ya'll counter act by saying, "don't be speaking that mexican round us". We all need to wake up, Sooner then later the n*ggaRican race will begin as we all havin babies with blacks, including myself, and so on and so forth. Bottom line tho, don't get latinos mixed up with those that have african roots. Not all of us try to capitalize on our negro roots when its convenient, cuz like I said earlier, its in our blood and we can't help it.

DAS WHAT IM TALKIN BOUT!!!!!!! Dont you dare confuse Mexicans with having that contaminting a*s black blood(sarcasm).

 14 years ago '04        #77
EmOnEyBaGz175 1 heat pts
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 mista SYN said
Dammit, quit refering to latinos having black blood, that's bullshyt. Mexicans are latinos, but they don't have african roots, its a select few parts of the latino culture, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, they all have afro roots. Salsa music, prodominant in all 3 cultures is derived from the African culture. Puerto Ricans and Dominicans believe it or not, are the "******s" of the hispanic race. The latino comunity loves to down-talk us, by saying we are the ghetto and bottom feeders of the latino culture. Because they speak proper spanish and we speak ebonic spanish. Who gives a fu*k!!! Our roots are our roots, and with everyones opinions you can't take it from us. Sure, you have people dissassociating themselves with blacks. Sure there are a select few, who don't like their children dating blacks. Its like that in all cultures. See people are so fu*king close minded that if a n*gga speak spanish, ya'll counter act by saying, "don't be speaking that mexican round us". We all need to wake up, Sooner then later the n*ggaRican race will begin as we all havin babies with blacks, including myself, and so on and so forth. Bottom line tho, don't get latinos mixed up with those that have african roots. Not all of us try to capitalize on our negro roots when its convenient, cuz like I said earlier, its in our blood and we can't help it.
March 3, 1996 -- In Mexico, various Indian peoples still play ancient instruments. And their songs and dances -- which tell of uprisings against their masters -- pay tribute to their ancestors.
These Mexicans play African "hand pianos" and perform "the dance of the black people." Mexican "corridos" -- or song-stories -- tell of slave uprisings. And the marimbas of Mexico, as well as those of Central America and Ecuador, all have their origins in Africa.

All are examples of the still thriving African legacy in Mexico.

Since 1492, the history of the Americas has been forged by three cultures: indigenous, European, and African - the third root of the Americas, according to the late University of Veracruz professor, Gonzalo Aguirre Beltrán, who was considered Mexico's foremost expert on the African influence on Mexican culture.

The early African presence in the Americas is normally a*sociated with the slave trade in the United States, the Caribbean, Brazil, Central America, Colombia and Peru. Not generally taught in history textbooks is that Mexico was also a key port of entry for slave ships and consequently had a large African population.

In fact, during the colonial era, there were more Africans than Europeans in Mexico, according to Aguirre Beltrán's pioneering 1946 book, "The Black Population in Mexico." And he said they didn't disappear, but in fact took part in forging the great racial mixture that is today Mexico.

"Because of race mixture, much of the African presence is no longer discernible except in a few places such as Veracruz and the Costa Chica in Guerrero and Oaxaca," wrote Aguirre Beltrán.

In Mexico, many of the Africans that entered came to what are now the states of Yucatan, Michoacan, Tlaxcala, Mexico, Chiapas, Veracruz, Guerrero and Oaxaca. Contrary to popular thought, they did not remain in the south but migrated throughout the whole of Mexico, where they were employed in occupations such as mining, the textile industry, ranching, fishing and agriculture. Blacks in Mexico weren't simply slaves. Many were explorers and cofounders of settlements as far north as Los Angeles and other parts of what is today the Southwest United States.

Prior to independence from Spain, there were numerous slave rebellions throughout the Americas, including in Mexico. The first documented slave rebellion in Mexico occurred in 1537; this was followed by the establishment of various runaway slave settlements called "palenques." Some rebellions were in alliance with Indians and mestizos even as far north as Chihuahua. In 1608, Spaniards negotiated the establishment of a free black community with Yagna, a runaway rebel slave. Today, that community in Veracruz bears its founder's name.

The principal guerrilla f*ghters for Mexican independence from Spain were Indians, mestizos and mulattos. One of the primary leaders of the independence movement, José María Morelos y Pavón, was mulatto, or of African ancestry, as was Vicente Guerrero, Mexico's second president, who officially abolished slavery in 1822. Slavery was actually not done away with until 1829.

Of note, Aguirre Beltrán's research was not well-received in Mexico, says Gabriel Moedano Navarro, director of ethnohistory at the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico. By 1946, the psyche of the Mexican nation as a mixture of Indian and Spanish blood was well-formed.

Also hidden from history is Mexico's role as a sanctuary to African American slaves during the 19th century. Unknown to even most historians, descendants of these slaves still live in Mexico.

In the summer of 1850, the Mascogos, composed of runaway slaves and free blacks from Florida, along with Seminoles and Kikapus, fled south from the United States, to the Mexican border state of Coahuila. Accompanying the Seminoles were also 'Black Seminoles' -- slaves who had been freed by the tribe after battles against white settlers in Florida.

The three groups eventually settled the town of El Nacimiento, Coahuila, where many of their descendants remain, including some of our distant relatives.

The African presence in Mexico is not so much denied as it is obscured. Aguirre Beltrán's work has brought to light something most Mexicans and Mexican Americans have historically been unaware of -- that they, like other Latinos, have not only Indian and Spanish blood, but African blood as well.

In times of racial discord between Latinos and African Americans, this historical confluence of cultures should serve as a reminder that both communities share common ancestors. In fact, if we probe far enough, we're all related.
now shut up u crack baby ALL latinos had/has a african bloodline african slavery existed in south america,central america,caribbeans maybe the only ones with the true 100 % spaniard ancestry is argentina from then on all all spanish/latin countries had african ancestry...the only difference from someone from mexico to someone from dominican republic is that indians we're taking out in places like puerto rico,cuba,d.r and replaced by africans in mexico what they did was got rid of blacks and let the indians be the slaves..go read a book tu no ere latino si no entiende nuesta history mamañema

 11-20-2004, 12:37 AM         #78
13lack  OP
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 EmOnEyBaGz175 said
now shut up u crack baby ALL latinos had/has a african bloodline african slavery existed in south america,central america,caribbeans maybe the only ones with the true 100 % spaniard ancestry is argentina from then on all all spanish/latin countries had african ancestry...the only difference from someone from mexico to someone from dominican republic is that indians we're taking out in places like puerto rico,cuba,d.r and replaced by africans in mexico what they did was got rid of blacks and let the indians be the slaves..go read a book tu no ere latino si no entiende nuesta history mamañema
thats what i was talkin about. Most Latinos dont want be black or have any kind of connection to Africa. Let them be different. I personally dont have a problem with that. Eveyone is what they WANT TO BE.

Im AA and i LOVE and am proud my connection to the Diaspora and slavery. I wish i was darker than what the fu*k I am. I know my history.

Its Ironic because i was just reading something about how Asiatic people were not the First Americans. Africans were making voyages to America WAAAAAAAAAAAAAY before the now known Native American which are Asian in origin.

Blacks were on this earth and have had ancient technologies for about 100,000 years. waaaaaaaaaaay before ANYONE.

Even the first Buddah was BLACK I have a picture.
[pic - click to view]



Even in Indian spirituality
[pic - click to view]



Last edited by 13lack; 11-20-2004 at 12:38 AM..

 14 years ago '04        #79
EmOnEyBaGz175 1 heat pts
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 13lack said
thats what i was talkin about. Most Latinos dont want be black or have any kind of connection to Africa. Let them be different. I personally dont have a problem with that. Eveyone is what they WANT TO BE.

Im AA and i LOVE and am proud my connection to the Diaspora and slavery. I wish i was darker than what the fu*k I am. I know my history.

Its Ironic because i was just reading something about how Asiatic people were not the First Americans. Africans were making voyages to America WAAAAAAAAAAAAAY before the now known Native American which are Asian in origin.

Blacks were on this earth and have had ancient technologies for about 100,000 years. waaaaaaaaaaay before ANYONE.

Even the first Buddah was BLACK I have a picture.
[pic - click to view]



Even in Indian spirituality
[pic - click to view]

*smh at me being home on a friday night/saturday morning
but i got you son dont get me twisted just cause i identify under latino dosent mean i dont embrace my african ancestry even tho i dont look like it i have a african bloodline i have dark skinned family members if it wasnt for their straight hair or their language they would be consider BLACK by people but also i cant downplay my indian,spaniard bloodline neither thats why i identify has being latino most of us understand our bloodline and we embrace it.Im proud of being Latino but i cant downplay my African ancestry.
*edit* and heres a map of the african diaspora.For anyone that wants to argue about mexicans and other latinos that are not from the carribeans not having a african bloodline

[pic - click to view]



Last edited by EmOnEyBaGz175; 11-20-2004 at 12:54 AM..

 11-20-2004, 01:06 AM         #80
13lack  OP
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*smh at me being home on a saturday night*
but i got you son dont get me twisted just cause i identify under latino dosent mean i dont embrace my african ancestry even tho i dont look like it i have a african bloodline i have dark skinned family members if it wasnt for their good hair or their language they would be consider BLACK by people but also i cant downplay my indian,spaniard bloodline neither thats why i identify has being latino most of us understand our bloodline and we embrace it.Im proud of being Latino but i cant downplay my African ancestry.
UHHHH its Friday.

I dont have a problem with that. All im sayin is you( the proverbial "you" not you personally). You can be different you dont have to embrace anyhting or try to get others to embrace a culture that the MAJORITY of latinos obviously don't want. ITS A FACT OF YOUR CULTURE.

Its not obligatory for you to state you embrace it. It dosent really make me feel any special kinship towards Latino people. I feel kinship towards Black people. And let me get something straight about the statement i just made. Just because i dont feel a kinship dosent mean i hate latinos. Its just that im one Black person that just dosent buy into the hype that balcks and Latinos are one love dovey happy family. Its just simply not true.

Were totally different but can still be cool with each other. But blacks is still FAM. From light to dark. Thas the way i feel. I would neva claim anything else even though im mixed indirectly like most AA.

 11-20-2004, 01:11 AM         #81
13lack  OP
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UHHHH its Friday.

I dont have a problem with that. All im sayin is you( the proverbial "you" not you personally). You can be different you dont have to embrace anyhting or try to get others to embrace a culture that the MAJORITY of latinos obviously don't want. ITS A FACT OF YOUR CULTURE.

Its not obligatory for you to state you embrace it. It dosent really make me feel any special kinship towards Latino people. I feel kinship towards Black people. The people who had to sit at the back of the bus, the people who got hoses turned on them, the people who created the frist civilization over 100,000 years ago, The people who were stripped of their culture and created a whole new one in America. Thats the people who I feel akinship to. And let me get something straight about the statement i just made. Just because i dont feel a kinship dosent mean i hate latinos. Its just that im one Black person that just dosent buy into the hype that balcks and Latinos are one love dovey happy family. Its just simply not true.

Were totally different but can still be cool with each other. But blacks is still FAM. From light to dark. Thas the way i feel. I would neva claim anything else even though im mixed indirectly like most AA.

 14 years ago '04        #82
EmOnEyBaGz175 1 heat pts
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 13lack said
UHHHH its Friday.

I dont have a problem with that. All im sayin is you( the proverbial "you" not you personally). You can be different you dont have to embrace anyhting or try to get others to embrace a culture that the MAJORITY of latinos obviously don't want. ITS A FACT OF YOUR CULTURE.

Its not obligatory for you to state you embrace it. It dosent really make me feel any special kinship towards Latino people. I feel kinship towards Black people. The people who had to sit at the back of the bus, the people who got hoses turned on them, the people who created the frist civilization over 100,000 years ago, The people who were stripped of their culture and created a whole new one in America. Thats the people who I feel akinship to. And let me get something straight about the statement i just made. Just because i dont feel a kinship dosent mean i hate latinos. Its just that im one Black person that just dosent buy into the hype that balcks and Latinos are one love dovey happy family. Its just simply not true.

Were totally different but can still be cool with each other. But blacks is still FAM. From light to dark. Thas the way i feel. I would neva claim anything else even though im mixed indirectly like most AA.
Well that's you i cant say all latinos accept the african bloodline but the history is there there is no way to get past seeing that.Has far has latinos denyin or hating blacks well it's just not a one way thing blacks do the same,has far has saying n*gga well i see it like this it really goes where u from im from ny and out here we dont have that many racial tensions.In the other hand ive been to cali and they do have racial wars and sh*t.But dont get it twizted just 'cause latinos have african roots dosent mean we black.We cant claim black that would be downplaying our other roots(indian,spaniard).Has far has u arguin the fact that not only latinos are saying n*gga that whites and other races are using it well i can only say that u have ya own people to blame for that.If fat joe would make a song saying spicK this and spicK that then i wouldnt get mad at the people that are using it but i would get mad at the people that influenced the kids to say the word.

 11-20-2004, 01:41 AM         #83
13lack  OP
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Well that's you i cant say all latinos accept the african bloodline but the history is there there is no way to get past seeing that.Has far has latinos denyin or hating blacks well it's just not a one way thing blacks do the same,has far has saying n*gga well i see it like this it really goes where u from im from ny and out here we dont have that many racial tensions.In the other hand ive been to cali and they do have racial wars and sh*t.But dont get it twizted just 'cause latinos have african roots dosent mean we black.We cant claim black that would be downplaying our other roots(indian,spaniard).Has far has u arguin the fact that not only latinos are saying n*gga that whites and other races are using it well i can only say that u have ya own people to blame for that.If fat joe would make a song saying spicK this and spicK that then i wouldnt get mad at the people that are using it but i would get mad at the people that influenced the kids to say the word.
just like i said were different. might as well say a different race. I can be cool wit a Latino but this whole latino and blacks struggle the same way and all that ohter sh*t has got to stop. We can be different and be cool.

About the spick/n*gga thing.I said i am angry at blacks for not stoppin that shyt earlier in the game. You cant do nothin about it now.

 14 years ago '04        #84
EmOnEyBaGz175 1 heat pts
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Well son that's you i cant force u to think like other AA's and latinos.In my opinion we go thru some of the same struggles..alot of AA's and Latinos know this but there are those who disagree.Each with their own case

 11-20-2004, 10:53 AM         #85
visionary  OP
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The color of my skin is black, darker than alot of african-americans, but I consider myself as a Boricua(Puerto Rican). I knoe that my bloodline has Taino Indian, Borinquen Indian, spaniard, and africano. But I'm Puerto Rican, a Latino, a race SEPERATE and DIFFERENT than Blacks.

And often Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and Cubans are criticized by the rest of the Latino world for speaking a "slang" spanish, different culture, darker skinned people, etc. etc. The different culture exists because we (cubanos. boricuas, dominicanos) are located in the Caribbean seperate from where the most Latino countries are located (south america, central america).

But the most idolized Puerto Rican, if not Latino is Roberto Clemente, who is black skinned.

Latinos, again, are an ethnicity of their own, not Black, not White, not Asian, we are Latino...yes we are completely DIFFERENT from Blacks.

But to say that there is not a bond between the two DIFFERENT races in America, is insane. Again Hispanics in America grow up in lower-class neighborhoods for the most part, we also are a target of the police for sh*t we don't do, you think my family hasn't expierienced racism?. And the average Latino makes less than the average African-American.

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 11-20-2004, 01:05 PM         #86
13lack  OP
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 visionary said
The color of my skin is black, darker than alot of african-americans, but I consider myself as a Boricua(Puerto Rican). I knoe that my bloodline has Taino Indian, Borinquen Indian, spaniard, and africano. But I'm Puerto Rican, a Latino, a race SEPERATE and DIFFERENT than Blacks.

And often Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and Cubans are criticized by the rest of the Latino world for speaking a "slang" spanish, different culture, darker skinned people, etc. etc. The different culture exists because we (cubanos. boricuas, dominicanos) are located in the Caribbean seperate from where the most Latino countries are located (south america, central america).

But the most idolized Puerto Rican, if not Latino is Roberto Clemente, who is black skinned.

Latinos, again, are an ethnicity of their own, not Black, not White, not Asian, we are Latino...yes we are completely DIFFERENT from Blacks.

But to say that there is not a bond between the two DIFFERENT races in America, is insane. Again Hispanics in America grow up in lower-class neighborhoods for the most part, we also are a target of the police for sh*t we don't do, you think my family hasn't expierienced racism?. And the average Latino makes less than the average African-American.

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Exactly, you can be different because you ARE different

 11-20-2004, 01:26 PM         #87
13lack  OP
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The way I see it, this minority designation for Latinos came about because of a number of reasons. One was the meddling in Hispanic affairs by liberals in need of a cause, and the other was the result of Black leadership agitation. In some cases it may have been born out of good will, yet in others it was a way to boost their cause and a bad case of crab antics.

Contrary to the way you see it, the minority designation came about not because of Black leadership agitation but through changes in the thinking of Hispanics themselves -- mostly Mexican American -- during the latter part of the sixties. Prior to that Hispanics of all nationalities were quite content seeing themselves as white (desiring all of the privileges that come with White membership). Historically, Hispanics have never been supportive of the civil rights movement. In Texas, which was a Jim Crow state, Mexicans were legally white, though socially treated otherwise. They never made common cause with blacks nor did they see anything wrong with their mistreatment (unlike many white liberals). Hispanics’ identity became an issue in the late sixties and seventies as a result of being influenced, just like white ethnics, by Black Nationalism’s ascendancy the within the black community. There was no “agitation” on the part of blacks within the Hispanic community. So if you are looking to blame anyone for Hispanics’ minority designation, you need look no further than your own community.
Something interesting I got from a discussion on another site.


Last edited by 13lack; 11-20-2004 at 01:27 PM..

 11-20-2004, 02:05 PM         #88
visionary  OP
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that's true for Mexicans. A Puerto Rican or Dominican isn't gonna think that way, they consider themselves Puerto Rican or Dominican.

Why do you think Mexicans hate Puerto Ricans so much? you think that's just something people say? hell no

there is much hate between mexicans and puerto ricans for many reasons including the one you just posted 13Lack

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 14 years ago '04        #89
dblock187s 29 heat pts29
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i wouldve beat that fat n*gga the fu*k up, but i still listen to some of his songs im not gone front

 11-20-2004, 02:52 PM         #90
13lack  OP
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that's true for Mexicans. A Puerto Rican or Dominican isn't gonna think that way, they consider themselves Puerto Rican or Dominican.

Why do you think Mexicans hate Puerto Ricans so much? you think that's just something people say? hell no

there is much hate between mexicans and puerto ricans for many reasons including the one you just posted 13Lack
If you notice that quote said Hispanics of ALL NATIONALITIES. I know Mexiacans dont like Pr, Dominicans, etc because they feel your somehow tarbrushed or tainted with the dreaded African Blood. Most mexicans, like the one who posted above feel that they are totally native american. At the point in time in the quote is speaking of, Hispanics were white in this country. The quote is basically answering the statement of, when were Latinos considered minorities and how they were influenced by the Black movement during that time. The person answers and says Latinos of ALL nationalities basically considered themselves white in this country prior to the late 60's. They were influenced but not agitated by the Black nationalist movement of that time. To agitate them means blacks would have had to go after Hispanics and try to incite them into givin up thier "whiteness" they had at that time. Black nationlist didnt do that. The hispanics simply looked at the movement and decided to become a minority group. Basically prior to the late 60's Latinos/ Hispanics of ALL NATIONALITIES( according to the person i quoted, i have to research it) were white and perfectly content with being white and takin advatages of the privaleges of being white.

What i also found interesting is the writer says "Historically Hispanics have never supported the Civil Rights movement". I have to research that.

 11-20-2004, 03:27 PM         #91
visionary  OP
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That's because there weren't nearly as many hispanics from whatever country living in the U.S, there wasn't enough of them to be considered their own race. My grandfather once told me when i was younger that when his friend went to the U.S, thinking that it'd be a better way of life he was happy and was the first person that my grandfather personally knew going to the U.S. Within two months of living there my grandfather found out that he was shot dead by a White Man. My grandfather also told me that when he went to live in Harlem for two years many whites called him "sp1c", "we are your conquerers", "go back to your sh*t bag country", and one that hurt the most he told me "Puerto Ricans do not deserve to live".

I take it personal when you start to say dumb sh*t like that when we didn't even have enough Latinos until the 60's and 70's to be a race. We were nothing, I've had people that are friends of my family dead just for bein Puerto Rican.

Of course we didn't participate in the civil rights movement, we didn't have the knowledge to speak english and understand what it actually was. Though I did read in a book that there were small amounts of Latinos that actually were actually in support and were at the march where King Jr. gave his speech.

Puerto Ricans and Mexicans are DIFFERENT, and NO Puerto Ricans didn't consider themselves white, black, nor latino in the 40's or before, they considered themselves Puerto Rican, at that time we believed as that as our race.

Don't try to downgrade my Puerto Rican ancestory,what my grandfather went through was tough too.


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 11-20-2004, 05:16 PM         #92
13lack  OP
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 visionary said
That's because there weren't nearly as many hispanics from whatever country living in the U.S, there wasn't enough of them to be considered their own race. My grandfather once told me when i was younger that when his friend went to the U.S, thinking that it'd be a better way of life he was happy and was the first person that my grandfather personally knew going to the U.S. Within two months of living there my grandfather found out that he was shot dead by a White Man. My grandfather also told me that when he went to live in Harlem for two years many whites called him "sp1c", "we are your conquerers", "go back to your sh*t bag country", and one that hurt the most he told me "Puerto Ricans do not deserve to live".

I take it personal when you start to say dumb sh*t like that when we didn't even have enough Latinos until the 60's and 70's to be a race. We were nothing, I've had people that are friends of my family dead just for bein Puerto Rican.

Of course we didn't participate in the civil rights movement, we didn't have the knowledge to speak english and understand what it actually was. Though I did read in a book that there were small amounts of Latinos that actually were actually in support and were at the march where King Jr. gave his speech.

Puerto Ricans and Mexicans are DIFFERENT, and NO Puerto Ricans didn't consider themselves white, black, nor latino in the 40's or before, they considered themselves Puerto Rican, at that time we believed as that as our race.

Don't try to downgrade my Puerto Rican ancestory,what my grandfather went through was tough too.


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How am I trying to downgrade your PR ancestory?

 14 years ago '04        #93
EmOnEyBaGz175 1 heat pts
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As we all know the term "Hipanic" or "Latino" did not exist during or before the 1960s. It was a term created out of the necessity of Mexicans-Americans (which form about 80% of the Latino population) to defend their own rights as Americans and human beings. Before the 1960s Mexican-Americans were the target of racial discrimination and segregration as African-Americans were. The problem with Mexican-Americans was that, legally, they were considered 'White' so they did not have any legal defense against segregation. In this case, they had to look for ways to separate themselves from Whites and African-Americans for their rights to be recognize and for a State recognition of the racial discrimination they were suffering. By using Spanish as the main cause of differentiation, they were able to prove their case. In this sense, the term Hispanic or Latino for that matter are political representations for a group to be recognized rather than an ethnic lineage (which was irrelevant when it came to defend Mexican-Americans' human rights in the American Political System). Nowadays the terms Hispanic/Latino covers not only Mexican-Americans but also people from other Latin American countries and Puerto Ricans.
.............................

 11-20-2004, 05:39 PM         #94
visionary  OP
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maybe i over-reacted when i said u downgrade my ancestory, but the quote that you posted of the stupid Mexican who said that is completely, 100 muh fukin percent wrong.

saying that we(P-Ricans) were considered white before the term "Latino/Hispanic" came into play. You say it as if the hispanics coming over to America were perfectly free to do what they pleased when the truth is many latinos were k*lled due to racism. We were considered nothing, looked at as people who didn't exist, dog sh*t on the side of the road. I cannot speak for Mexicans and other hispanic nationalities other than Dominicans and Puerto Ricans. The Ricans and Dominicans considered themsleves dominican or Rican and had no choice but to live on the streets or live with the African-American community. Why do you think The Bronx and Harlem have so much to do in the history of Latinos in America?

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Last edited by visionary; 11-20-2004 at 05:42 PM..

 14 years ago '04        #95
EmOnEyBaGz175 1 heat pts
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Mexican Americans, Mexicanos, Hispanos, Chicanos, and Tejanos (or Tex-Mex) have been the target of most discrimination and prejudice, and are the poorest of all Hispanic/Latino groups. They are the most rapidly-growing minority group in America. A significant event in Mexican American history was the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, which ended the war between Mexico and the U.S. According to terms of the treaty, Mexicans remaining on U.S. land became U.S. citizens and would receive a parcel of land to live on and Spanish would be recognized as a legitimate language. These terms of the treaty were never honored, and about 500,000 Mexicans who chose to convert found themselves in the unusual situation of renting their own land from the U.S. government. The next wave of immigration came between 1890 and 1900, when about 500,000 Mexicans crossed the border in response to U.S. corporations who advertised for cheap labor. Many more escaped to the U.S. during the 1910-1917 Mexican revolution. U.S. policy allowed unrestricted immigration until 1930 when our special "open door" relationship with Mexico came under heavy criticism. Since then, there have been various repatriation efforts to get Mexicans back to Mexico, such as Operation Wetback in 1954 and the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). Operation Wetback gave the Border Patrol extraordinary powers, and IRCA fined employers $3000 for each illegal alien they hired but set up a green card lottery. It's estimated that the Border Patrol and the INS return back at least 1 million Mexicans a year under these programs, but an estimated 3 million a year slip through.

Puerto Ricans generally view the U.S. positively as a place to improve their standard of living. They are the one people in this group most likely to be bilingual, i.e., to speak English. They come from the only country in the Caribbean with a big city, a metropolitan area (San Juan). Their country is the oldest colony of the U.S., and although they are citizens, they cannot vote in federal elections. They are also frequently visible because of skin color. Some have extremely black skin, and in some places the word "Latino" is reserved for those with lighter skin tones. Job recruiters sometimes travel to Puerto Rico to get workers for the sweatshops in the NYC garment industry. The freedom to travel in and out, combined with cheap airfares at times and economic recessions on the island, lead to situations where, at any given time, 20% of the island population (3.5 million) are living in the U.S. Half the island's population emigrated to the U.S. during the 1970s. Most cannot find jobs, and a pattern of welfare dependency, unemployment, and movement back and forth to the island exists. Estimates put the number of unemployed Puerto Ricans in the U.S. at 60%. The freedom of movement back and forth to the island may be a curse as well as blessing, for it disrupts family life and impedes chances for a stable occupational history. Puerto Rican communities complain that they are the victims of police brutality and sentence discrimination. Riots over police action have broken out in some communities, and indeed, Puerto Ricans are more likely to be incarcerated than given probation, and they do receive longer sentences for similar criminal acts.

Cuban Americans are the smallest segment of the Hispanic/Latino population. Their communities are firmly established in south Florida, especially Miami where they have a stable economic base built around small businesses and banking, and an economic plan for when Cuba is free again. 25% of all banks and 5 of the top ten 10 corporations in Dade County are Cuban owned and operated. Because of their refugee immigrant status, U.S. policy toward them has been somewhat favorable. In fact, Cubans are the only immigrant group that can claim citizenship after just being in the U.S. for one year. During the arrival of about 500,000 of them in the 1960s, Congress created resettlement programs for job training, small business loans, educational subsidies, and home purchases. It is also fairly well known that this group of refugees were from the upper and middle classes of Cuba. During 1980, Fidel Castro emptied about 125,000 people from Cuban prisons and mental hospitals, beginning the Mariel boatlifts, which brought a different population to America, and the U.S. responded by processing them at Eglin Air Force Base where several riots broke out and federal troops were called in. Much of this population wound up deported or in the nation's prisons (for crimes or what the BOP calls "temporary detention"), but many were released into the community, boosting local unemployment rates from 5% to 13%. Officially, Miami takes pride in being a bilingual-bicultural town, but unofficially, several residents, including the African American community, resent the increasing "Latinization" of Florida. Cuban Americans have the highest educational, economic, and occupational levels of any Hispanic/Latino group. Their educational levels are even higher than whites. Most of them are affiliated with the Republican party because they practice exile politics via ethnic politics.


ECONOMIC DISCRIMINATION

Poverty levels, on average, are twice as high as whites. 60% of all families are headed by a female, and 40% of these females don't have a high school diploma. Only about 6% of the population attend college, but as a group, surveys reveal a tremendous amount of respect for higher education. In terms of earnings, this minority group averages about 60% of the white income average. In terms of health, the major concern is low birth weight, which is usually a sign of inadequate prenatal care or problems accessing healthcare. Homicide also accounts for 25% of Latino deaths, with AIDS the second leading cause of death (highest in Puerto Rican communities), but it depends upon what age ranges you look at. Unemployment may be a problem because the Southwestern U.S. is the place where the economy fluctuates most. U.S. employers have always found Latino culture easy to exploit because of the padrone-peon system that exists all through Latin America. In 1995, California also passed Proposition 187 which made undocumented aliens ineligible for any kind of social welfare services, including emergency medical care.

HOUSING DISCRIMINATION

Latinos live in segregated communities, although there's some interesting East Coast and West Coast differences. Those with African heritage usually live in African American communities. Surprisingly, there is less segregation when the critical mass of Latinos reaches a certain number, like 25%, which is about their composition in a city like Los Angeles. This is an ethnic group with some of the highest fertility rates on earth, and housing tends to be overcrowded. The trends and forecasts in population growth for this group are due to fertility and not illegal immigration.

Latinos are also a mobile group. The same individual may have multiple addresses. Adolescents may live with another family that has a different name. It is common for families to have "latchkey" children or have them cared for by older children in the neighborhood. I don't wish to create any stereotypes, but Latino parenting techniques are somewhat different from Anglo techniques. Because of the "fear" factor involving the practice of police break-ins throughout Latin America, American Hispanics/Latinos are extremely sensitive to authorities entering their home. Their homes are also burglarized at a rate 25 times the Anglo rate for residential burglary, yet few crime prevention programs are made available to them, and landlords don't seem to care. They are the most difficult group to get involved with community policing.
..............................

 14 years ago '04        #96
EmOnEyBaGz175 1 heat pts
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EDUCATIONAL DISCRIMINATION

It was well into the 1930s before the U.S. even considered that the lack of schools for Mexican American children was a problem. Gerrymandering of school district lines and other ordinances prevented them from attending the regular U.S. public school system. Some of the segregated schools for Latinos suffered from lack of funding, had few resources, and things like administrators and counselors were unheard of. A study by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights found in 1972 that integrated schools were no better since teachers and students tended to ridicule the Latinos for their accent or what they brought for lunch. The levels of functional illiteracy (defined as 0-4 years of elementary school) are 7 times as high as the white population.

The bilingual movement in education started as far back as 1968 with Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The hope was to reduce dropout rates and sensitize Americans to the rich culture and traditions of Latinos. Yet, few schools experimented with bilingual education. Only a 1974 Supreme Court decision (Lau v. Nichols) prohibited schools from ignoring the problem and required that instructions at least be given in the student's native language. Currently, bilingual education is at the same place as when it started, and there is a strong backlash of "English only" laws in several places, such as Proposition 63 in California during 1986 which declared English the official state language. Arizona, Colorado, and Florida soon followed suit. In many schools, Spanish-speaking students are still classified as "learning disabled". In other schools, there are strong attempts at bilingual education. Unfortunately, there's not much constitutional law on the subject. Over 3.5 billion dollars a year are spent on bilingual education, which many critics consider a waste.

POLITICAL DISCRIMINATION

For their numbers, Latinos are politically underrepresented at all levels of public life, even in New York City, where you would think the number of Puerto Ricans would translate into political power. Overall, Latinos are somewhat likely to affiliate with the Democratic Party, but much of this is due to a "Viva Kennedy" movement in the early 1960s which was actually the high point in their civil rights struggle. The problem is that less than 20% of this population is registered to vote. Mexican American voter registration rates are higher, but turnout at the polls is a different matter. Some Latino groups are strongly Democrat while others are strongly Republican. Politicians have come to realize there's no such thing as a Latino voting bloc. Even towns like Laredo, Brownsville, and McAllen in Texas have Anglo leaderships while the populations are 90% Latino or more.

SOCIAL DISCRIMINATION

American culture is replete with negative stereotypes about Latinos. Whether it's the "greaser", "bandito", or "macho" stereotype, they are portrayed as lazy, shiftless, lawless, thieving, immoral, or violent. Most of these stereotypes go back to the War with Mexico. "Greaser", for example, came to be applied to other ethnic groups, but originated with the use of Mexicans to grease wagon train wheels. One of the major events that resulted in some permanent social damage was the Zoot Suit Riots of 1943. Young Mexican Americans (and some African Americans) started dressing in long coats with padded shoulders, porkpie hats, watch chains, and peg-top trousers tapered to narrow cuffs. The outfit was later picked up in the 1960s by blacks as the superpimp look, and it has made a comeback in the 1990s with swing music. It was designed to be battle gear to defend themselves in LA from the sailors who were encouraging the red light districts of their neighborhoods. Numerous f*ghts and k*llings broke out between the Zoot Suiters and servicemen, and for several nights, the police response was to let vigilante bands of servicemen and citizens run amok and with impunity maim or k*ll as many Latinos and Africans as they wanted. More Mexican Americans died in the Zoot Suit Riots than all who served in WW II.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE DISCRIMINATION

The most significant problems are inadequate defense and lower rates of appeal. Outside of MALDEF, there's a serious lack of legal aid for Hispanics/Latinos. While only 21% of the Latino community speak English, less than 5% of police, lawyers, judges, court and correctional personnel speak Spanish, and there's really no movement or initiatives underway to change that situation. Translation and court interpreter services are either absent, inadequate, or according to some evidentiary principles, unfair. On the frontline, Latinos have extensive complaints about harassment and abuse at the hands of police officers. Agencies like the Border Patrol and Texas Rangers have "carte blanche", and the law is incredibly relaxed for all police departments in the area of random stops and searches. Also, no other minority group has ever been deported in such large numbers as Hispanics/Latinos.

 11-20-2004, 06:01 PM         #97
visionary  OP
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Hey E-Money Bagz, your one smart dominican lol,

nice job findin that sh*t.

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 14 years ago '04        #98
EmOnEyBaGz175 1 heat pts
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 visionary said
Hey E-Money Bagz, your one smart dominican lol,

nice job findin that sh*t.

1
Te tu ta tratando de decir con eso boricua aaaaaaaaaa
na j/p and im d.r/ecuadorian :)

 11-20-2004, 06:31 PM         #99
visionary  OP
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que tu es bien inteligente y que los sanganos que hablan mal de los hispanos estan celoso

lol, j/p much respect


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 11-20-2004, 07:11 PM         #100
13lack  OP
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Well all thats good but i dont know enough about the latino plight in relation to the African American plight so I'll continue researching it. All i know for sure is they are two Totally different experiences.

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