Nas - Untitled (2008)

most viewed right now
 70
NBA Woj: Cp3 unlikely to play game 7
96 comments
@sports
most viewed right now
 62
Drake- I’m Upset
298 comments
@hiphop
most viewed right now
 46
Who wrote the Duppy freestyle?
149 comments
@hiphop
most viewed right now
 39
Image(s) inside Rhymefest Responds To Kim Kardashian!
134 comments
@hiphop

section   (0 bx goons and 1 bystanders) Share this on Twitter   Share this on Facebook
 

What it is??!??!?!??!
5 - Classic and nothing less 244 51.91%
4 - Nas came through 172 36.60%
3 - Not bad but nothing special 29 6.17%
2 - Mediocre 12 2.55%
1 - Nas your time is up 13 2.77%
Voters: 470. Sorry, you cannot vote on this poll (Boxden members only)

[Click here to become a member]

Props Slaps
 10 years ago '06        #261
antoniolucky 
space
space
space
$709 | Props total: 0 0
Nas spits some real shizzzzzzznit
 10 years ago '05        #262
JaiMega 
space
avatar space
space
$15,133 | Props total: 18 18
this album sucks now
 10 years ago '08        #263
TheFuckinEmpire 4 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$6,434 | Props total: 1762 1762
Its very nice but really doesn't have THAT much replay value, its great anyway almost a classic. Especially the song Black Presidents it was on point.
 10 years ago '05        #264
RashardAllen 
space
avatar space
space
$569 | Props total: 0 0
this might be another classic for nas
 10 years ago '04        #265
Jamaro85 
space
avatar space
space
$10,610 | Props total: 4 4
Who got sampled on Y'all My n*ggas? The intro and outro
 10 years ago '04        #266
tazbk 1 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$7,686 | Props total: 17 17
 Deuce Black said:



big things is my jam best nas flow ever
I hate that fu*king song with all my might. The epitome of Nas at his worst. I Am wasn't his worst disc. The Highs were High (NY State of Mind II, Nas Is Like, Undying Love) but the low's were low (You Wont See Me Tonight, I wanna Talk To You, K.I.S.S.I.N.G) and why did he do a song with DMx.

Shoulda said fu*k Stoute and Columbia and dropped the album the way it was intended. Columbia fu*ked that one up.
 08-08-2008, 12:27 PM         #267
taeOne 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
i use this cd to test my paint markers on
 10 years ago '05        #268
Left Hook 28 heat pts28
space
avatar space
space
$13,397 | Props total: 1875 1875
 taeOne said:
i use this cd to test my paint markers on
Was that supposed to make the others laugh

I'm bringing this back up..9/10, pure crack.
 08-29-2008, 11:30 PM         #269
The_Madvillain 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
3 TRACKS that stuck out to me

as unique

and incredible

sly fox

and fried chicken

project roach

IF U JUST LISTENNN!...just listen... listen!

genius..this dood is fu*king genius nuff said
 08-29-2008, 11:44 PM         #270
hiphop4ever 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
album still bangs i havnt stoped bumpin this yet....its easily nas's best since gods son
 09-03-2008, 05:52 PM         #271
weezybabyQC 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
yeah new album of Nas i will buy this CD
 09-05-2008, 04:45 PM         #272
K.Dub 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
Very very good album!

Album of 08 Contender.
 10 years ago '04        #273
DoctorJ|m 35 heat pts35
space
avatar space
space
$5,012 | Props total: 243 243
Here's my review for this cd, that's published at


Nas - Untitled
(by Doc J)

5 STARS (out of 6)
Superior album, among the year's best, with fresh ideas, excellent replay value, & next to no flaws

Nas never ceases to amaze me. He’s a seasoned veteran of over 14 years, whose been contemplating this whole zzzzzz-album movement back before his last album, “Hip Hop Is Dead”. I’ve seen the idea mature through all of its public ups and downs (sadly, more downs). What was once meant to be titled “zzzzzz”, took corporate pressure and financial threats to make Nas eventually change it to simply “Untitled”. One thing that’s clearly true is he’s been relatively alone on this album’s journey. Yet, the amazing part is his belief that people always will love the underdog. He’s provided us with a modern-day one-man-army to root for. Admittedly, I’m a long-time Nas fan, yet I am aware of all the criticisms that casual rap fans have been hindering him with, since the turn of the century. Beyond the consistent social theme and genuine dissection of the N-word, the incredible thing about this album is that he’s taken all bearing criticisms about him, and resourcefully tried to create music to confront each of them.

Proof that Nas is still a lyrical genius is the Stic.man–produced “We’re Not Alone”. Over a militant drum, spirited keys, and the somber chops of vocalist Mykel, Nas academically breaks down unifications within religion, race, philosophy, and even in the galaxy. I also view this as Nas’ proclamation that while many have been against him (and this album’s movement) he knows that he’s not alone on this mission. To combat the usual complaint that rappers forget where they’ve come from, Nas’ opening track “Queens Get The Money” vividly describes the current state of his old stomping grounds and glorifies who he still makes this music for. Over its percussionless, keyboard melody crafted by Jay Electronica, Nas spews lines like, “Intelligent gangstas/ they daddy’s faceless/ play this, by your stomach/ let my words massage it and rub it/I’ll be his daddy if there’s nobody there to love it”. For the J. Myers-produced “Breath”, Nas gives us a quiet riot about the regrets and stress of growing older in the city, over a refreshing beat reminiscent of A Tribe Called Quest. After this deep breathe, for those that question his energy, a more animated and angry Nas shines on tracks like “Sly Fox”, his rock-inspired diss going right for the Fox News Network’s jugular because of their manipulation, unfair monopolization, and shady business dealings; then on the DJ Toomp-produced “N.I.G.G.E.R. (Slave and the Master)”, Nas insightfully discusses black history, poverty, and racism; and in “Black President” where DJ Green Lantern uses a 2Pac sample from “Changes” and Barack Obama sound-bites very effectively, Nas powerfully speaks on the pros and cons of potentially electing the first black president later this year.

Even on the album’s more radio-friendly songs, Nas offers some quality gems that work and fit into the track sequencing showing what some ‘zzzzzzs’ strive for. The upbeat and celebratory ”We Make The World Go Round” from Cool-&-Dre, has both Nas and The Game trading good chemistry, alongside the surprise singing of Chris Brown. On the first single “Hero”, Nas pleads to be our culture’s hero, coupled with Keri Hilson’s strong harmonizing, over a drum-heavy, futuristic club-hybrid beat by Polow Da Don, providing the best chance of crossover success on this album. Based on its message and catchiness, I’m disappointed that none of the blockbuster ‘superhero’ movies this summer have latched on to this song for a theme or soundtrack appearance.

What Nas is skillfully most known for is having a metaphorical track giving an object or place human traits, on each album. On this CD, there are impressively (3) songs like this. While “Project Roach” gives us a detailed perspective from a roach in the hood (with additional spoken word commentary from the Last Poets), and “Fried Chicken” has Nas and Busta Rhymes collaborating over their food fetishes with the ghetto’s food of choice, respectively, “Yall My n*ggas” is my favorite of the three. On a springy, keyboard and cymbal-heavy beat provided by J. Myers, the focus is on Nas’ lyrical exploration of the history and different meanings of the word ‘zzzzzz’. With lyrics like “Try to erase me from your memory/ Too late, I’m engraved in history” and “Yall use my name so reckless/ whether to be excepted or disrespected”, Nas actually turns the criticism inward and articulately explains how the word will never disappear.

The only real stumbles here are on the execution of a couple tracks. “Can’t Stop Us Now” isn’t a bad jazz-infused song produced by regular collaborator Salaam Remi. Still, it’s inconsistent verse concepts and sampling of the now overly-used Watnauts’ “Message of a Black Man” (also recently used by RZA, Inspectah Deck, Mos Def, MF Doom, Ill Bill, and others) weaken the replay value of it for me. Meanwhile, “Untitled”, in which is a thoughtful ode to Lois Farrakhan’s work and life has a lackluster beat and its transitional format make this appear more as a high schooler’s book report rather than a rap song. Additionally, Nas released a video online of a track “Be A n*gga Too” to promote this album, but due to a potential lawsuit from Dr. Pepper, he had to leave it off the final tracklisting. This song’s passion and insightful message that even white people can be accepted as ‘zzzzzzs’ definitely would have been a strong addition to the album.

Conclusively, even the flaws I’ve found are more so opinionative likes and dislikes of an anal reviewer. I cannot say enough about the depth of this album and I applaud Nas for taking such a professional (yet risky) stance in this case study. Even against adversity, Nas has delivered probably the best album of the year so far. While it’s debatable if this is teetering on the edge of a 5 or 6-star review and could be yet another potential classic from Nasir Jones; I will say that this album personally is one where you will notice something new, every time you listen to it again. This release is obviously not the first socially-charged political album in rap, but being that it’s one of the first for this generation, Nas easily joins the likes of revolutionary legends like Public Enemy and KRS-One. While dispelling some of his strongest criticisms of lacking energy and/or not selecting great beats, Nas has managed to instigate a more social review of the N-word, as well as selling enough his first week to capture another #1 album on the billboard charts. Indeed, his bid as one of the “greatest rappers of all-time” is strengthened, and the underdog has become loved once again.
 10 years ago '08        #274
hollaballooza 2 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$1,434 | Props total: 652 652
Been bumpin' this sh*t since July, best of Nas since Stillmatic in my book. A new classic for Nas and my favourite of the year - Too many classics to be overlooked; 'Queens Get The Money', 'Sly Fox', 'The Slave & The Master', 'Untitled', Project Roach'... See!? The Whole album is crack
 11-04-2008, 08:16 AM         #275
Street Baptist 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
Not his best album but its a good album, some dope tracks but some alright tracks too.
 10 years ago '04        #276
Dash420 21 heat pts21
space
avatar space
space
$15,117 | Props total: 6890 6890
RIP to jonathen jackson and george jackson...

*bumps Testify*
 12-14-2008, 11:59 PM         #277
MRELLIS1978 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
Welcome back nas....thanks for this fire cd
 12-15-2008, 03:06 PM         #278
k_dawwg04 
space
space
space
$n/a | Props total:  
I have to take my hat off to Nas for this CD. He did a good job on this one hope he can keep it up.
 9 years ago '05        #279
thaghost36 25 heat pts25
space
avatar space
space
$2,278 | Props total: 401 401
 DoctorJ said:
Here's my review for this cd, that's published at


Nas - Untitled
(by Doc J)

5 STARS (out of 6)
Superior album, among the year's best, with fresh ideas, excellent replay value, & next to no flaws

Nas never ceases to amaze me. He’s a seasoned veteran of over 14 years, whose been contemplating this whole zzzzzz-album movement back before his last album, “Hip Hop Is Dead”. I’ve seen the idea mature through all of its public ups and downs (sadly, more downs). What was once meant to be titled “zzzzzz”, took corporate pressure and financial threats to make Nas eventually change it to simply “Untitled”. One thing that’s clearly true is he’s been relatively alone on this album’s journey. Yet, the amazing part is his belief that people always will love the underdog. He’s provided us with a modern-day one-man-army to root for. Admittedly, I’m a long-time Nas fan, yet I am aware of all the criticisms that casual rap fans have been hindering him with, since the turn of the century. Beyond the consistent social theme and genuine dissection of the N-word, the incredible thing about this album is that he’s taken all bearing criticisms about him, and resourcefully tried to create music to confront each of them.

Proof that Nas is still a lyrical genius is the Stic.man–produced “We’re Not Alone”. Over a militant drum, spirited keys, and the somber chops of vocalist Mykel, Nas academically breaks down unifications within religion, race, philosophy, and even in the galaxy. I also view this as Nas’ proclamation that while many have been against him (and this album’s movement) he knows that he’s not alone on this mission. To combat the usual complaint that rappers forget where they’ve come from, Nas’ opening track “Queens Get The Money” vividly describes the current state of his old stomping grounds and glorifies who he still makes this music for. Over its percussionless, keyboard melody crafted by Jay Electronica, Nas spews lines like, “Intelligent gangstas/ they daddy’s faceless/ play this, by your stomach/ let my words massage it and rub it/I’ll be his daddy if there’s nobody there to love it”. For the J. Myers-produced “Breath”, Nas gives us a quiet riot about the regrets and stress of growing older in the city, over a refreshing beat reminiscent of A Tribe Called Quest. After this deep breathe, for those that question his energy, a more animated and angry Nas shines on tracks like “Sly Fox”, his rock-inspired diss going right for the Fox News Network’s jugular because of their manipulation, unfair monopolization, and shady business dealings; then on the DJ Toomp-produced “N.I.G.G.E.R. (Slave and the Master)”, Nas insightfully discusses black history, poverty, and racism; and in “Black President” where DJ Green Lantern uses a 2Pac sample from “Changes” and Barack Obama sound-bites very effectively, Nas powerfully speaks on the pros and cons of potentially electing the first black president later this year.

Even on the album’s more radio-friendly songs, Nas offers some quality gems that work and fit into the track sequencing showing what some ‘zzzzzzs’ strive for. The upbeat and celebratory ”We Make The World Go Round” from Cool-&-Dre, has both Nas and The Game trading good chemistry, alongside the surprise singing of Chris Brown. On the first single “Hero”, Nas pleads to be our culture’s hero, coupled with Keri Hilson’s strong harmonizing, over a drum-heavy, futuristic club-hybrid beat by Polow Da Don, providing the best chance of crossover success on this album. Based on its message and catchiness, I’m disappointed that none of the blockbuster ‘superhero’ movies this summer have latched on to this song for a theme or soundtrack appearance.

What Nas is skillfully most known for is having a metaphorical track giving an object or place human traits, on each album. On this CD, there are impressively (3) songs like this. While “Project Roach” gives us a detailed perspective from a roach in the hood (with additional spoken word commentary from the Last Poets), and “Fried Chicken” has Nas and Busta Rhymes collaborating over their food fetishes with the ghetto’s food of choice, respectively, “Yall My n*ggas” is my favorite of the three. On a springy, keyboard and cymbal-heavy beat provided by J. Myers, the focus is on Nas’ lyrical exploration of the history and different meanings of the word ‘zzzzzz’. With lyrics like “Try to erase me from your memory/ Too late, I’m engraved in history” and “Yall use my name so reckless/ whether to be excepted or disrespected”, Nas actually turns the criticism inward and articulately explains how the word will never disappear.

The only real stumbles here are on the execution of a couple tracks. “Can’t Stop Us Now” isn’t a bad jazz-infused song produced by regular collaborator Salaam Remi. Still, it’s inconsistent verse concepts and sampling of the now overly-used Watnauts’ “Message of a Black Man” (also recently used by RZA, Inspectah Deck, Mos Def, MF Doom, Ill Bill, and others) weaken the replay value of it for me. Meanwhile, “Untitled”, in which is a thoughtful ode to Lois Farrakhan’s work and life has a lackluster beat and its transitional format make this appear more as a high schooler’s book report rather than a rap song. Additionally, Nas released a video online of a track “Be A n*gga Too” to promote this album, but due to a potential lawsuit from Dr. Pepper, he had to leave it off the final tracklisting. This song’s passion and insightful message that even white people can be accepted as ‘zzzzzzs’ definitely would have been a strong addition to the album.

Conclusively, even the flaws I’ve found are more so opinionative likes and dislikes of an anal reviewer. I cannot say enough about the depth of this album and I applaud Nas for taking such a professional (yet risky) stance in this case study. Even against adversity, Nas has delivered probably the best album of the year so far. While it’s debatable if this is teetering on the edge of a 5 or 6-star review and could be yet another potential classic from Nasir Jones; I will say that this album personally is one where you will notice something new, every time you listen to it again. This release is obviously not the first socially-charged political album in rap, but being that it’s one of the first for this generation, Nas easily joins the likes of revolutionary legends like Public Enemy and KRS-One. While dispelling some of his strongest criticisms of lacking energy and/or not selecting great beats, Nas has managed to instigate a more social review of the N-word, as well as selling enough his first week to capture another #1 album on the billboard charts. Indeed, his bid as one of the “greatest rappers of all-time” is strengthened, and the underdog has become loved once again.

:applause: great review ...... based on this review im gonna give it one more listen because i dismissed the album as "boring" .... i mean it had it's gems like "queens get the money" "slave and the master" but i havent played it in months so lemme go back and listen to it again....
 8 years ago '09        #280
Teddy Loc 1 heat pts
space
avatar space
space
$4,160 | Props total: 234 234
4 stars, havent heard this album in a while....But still tight!!!
Home      
  
 

 






most viewed right now
 25
Video inside BREAKING - Chi Wire: MUBU Krump (The ScoreKeeper) DEAD !
86 comments
1 day ago
@hiphop
most viewed right now
 17
The Carter III Documentary Waynes Lawyers Didn't Want Us To See! (Addiction,bi..
60 comments
1 day ago
@hiphop
most viewed right now
 17
#bigbreasttwitter
61 comments
1 day ago
@thotsdimesetc
most viewed right now
 9
audio inside Drake - Duppy Freestyle
1354 comments
1 day ago
@hiphop
most viewed right now
 8
Image(s) inside May 25 - Why Are California’s Legal Marijuana Sales So Low?
122 comments
1 day ago
@news
most viewed right now
 7
Video inside May 25 - Pablo Escobar’s hitman Popeye arrested in Colombia
47 comments
1 day ago
@news
most viewed right now
 6
Article inside He bought a woman drinks. She left him at bar — he broke into her hom..
52 comments
1 day ago
@wild'ish
most viewed right now
 4
NBA Jaylen Brown just STEPPED to LEbron James :mjdamn:
20 comments
1 day ago
@sports
back to top
register contact Follow BX @ Twitter Follow BX @ Facebook search BX privacy