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 10 years ago '04        #21
1000bluntz  OP
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From the 8th, just getting around to posting it


McCarney officially joins Florida staff

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- University of Florida head football coach Urban Meyer announced the hiring of Dan McCarney as a member of the defensive coaching staff Friday afternoon. McCarney comes to Gainesville after spending the 2007 season at the University of South Florida as the a.ssistant Head Coach-Defensive Line following 12 seasons as the head coach at Iowa State.

“Dan is a great addition to our coaching staff,” said Meyer. “His experience as a head coach will be invaluable. He has a proven record as a recruiter and a development of talent and I have a tremendous amount of respect for him as a coach and a person.”

McCarney has 30 years of collegiate coaching experience, half of which has been spent specifically instructing defensive lines. While with USF, he mentored defensive end George Selvie, who was a consensus All-American as a sophomore and a finalist for the Bronko Nagurski and Ted Hendricks Awards. In 2007, Selvie led the nation in tackles for loss (31.5) and was second nationally in sacks (14.5). Overall, the Bulls ranked third nationally with 8.69 tackles for loss per game.

“I’m thrilled about joining the Gator Nation, said McCarney. “I have the utmost respect for Coach Meyer and the Florida football program. It is a dream come true for me and my wife and we are looking forward to the opportunity.”

McCarney, who was the longest tenured head coach in the Big 12 at the completion of the 2006 season, led the Iowa State program from
1995-2006. He took the Cyclones to five bowl games and in the 116-year history of the ISU program McCarney led five of the 16 teams that have won seven games or more. He was named the Big 12 Coach of the Year in 2004, when the Cyclones were the Big 12 North Co-Champions. McCarney’s
2000 squad was the first Iowa State team to win nine games in 94 years. In addition, the win over Pittsburgh in the Insight.com Bowl was ISU’s first-ever bowl victory and the Cyclones’ first bowl appearance since 1978.

McCarney remains the longest-serving (141 games) and winningest Cyclone head coach (56 victories) in school history. During his 12th season as Iowa State head coach in 2006, only eight head coaches among 119 NCAA Division I-A programs had been at their current school longer than McCarney.

Under McCarney, Iowa State had a balanced offensive attack. ISU produced a 1,000-yard rusher in McCarney’s first seven seasons in Ames. Troy Davis rushed for more than 2,000 yards in 1995 and 1996 and was a Heisman Trophy finalist both seasons. Tailback Ennis Haywood rushed for more than 1,000 yards in 2000 and 2001. Quarterback Sage Rosenfels produced the third-best passing season in school history in 2000 and quarterback Seneca Wallace was the Big 12 Conference’s Offensive Newcomer of the Year in 2001 and finished his Iowa State career as the Cyclones’ all-time leader in total offense.

McCarney was responsible for the rebirth of the Iowa State defense as the unit ranked among the Big 12 Conference’s leaders in total defense in 2001, 2002, 2004 and 2005. ISU’s final 2004 total defense mark of 329.4 yards allowed per game was the school’s best effort in nearly two decades. The Cyclones allowed 44.8 points per game in 1997, however, by 2005 the figure had dipped to 18.5, which ranked second in the Big 12. In 2003, true freshman Jason Berryman was named the Big 12 Conference Defensive Newcomer of the Year.

A native of Iowa City, Iowa, McCarney was instrumental in rebuilding efforts that produced Big Ten titles and Rose Bowl berths at both Iowa and Wisconsin. McCarney coached at Iowa for 13 seasons (1977-89), including 11 years under Hayden Fry, before becoming the defensive coordinator at Wisconsin under Barry Alvarez in 1990.

McCarney’s defense was the foundation for the Wisconsin rebuilding effort. In the four seasons prior to his arrival, the Badgers had a combined 9-36 record. In 1993, Wisconsin went 10-1-1, claimed its first Big 10 title in 31 years and scored a 21-16 win over UCLA in the Rose Bowl. During the Rose Bowl season, the Badgers ranked 19 nationally against the run (130.3 yards per game) and allowed just 16.3 points per game. The Badger defense intercepted an NCAA-best 23 passes and created 34 turnovers, including six against UCLA in the Rose Bowl.

A 1975 graduate of Iowa, McCarney coached the Hawkeyes in eight-consecutive bowl games, including the 1982 and 1986 Rose Bowls. The three-year letterman on the offensive line for Iowa (1972-74) was captain of the 1974 Hawkeye squad.

Dan McCarney Coaching Experience
2008 - Present Florida (Defensive staff)
2007 USF (Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Line)
1995-2006 Iowa State (Head Coach)
1990-94 Wisconsin (Defensive Coordinator/Defensive Line)
1979-89 Iowa (Defensive Line)
1977-78 Iowa (Offensive Line)

Personal Information Birthdate: July 28, 1953 Hometown: Iowa City, Iowa Education: Iowa (1975) Marital Status: Wife, Margy

Dan McCarney
Coaching Experience
2008 - Present Florida (Defensive staff)
2007 USF (Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Line)
1995-2006 Iowa State (Head Coach)
1990-94 Wisconsin (Defensive Coordinator/Defensive
Line)
1979-89 Iowa (Defensive Line)
1977-78 Iowa (Offensive Line)

Personal Information
Birthdate: July 28, 1953
Hometown: Iowa City, Iowa
Education: Iowa (1975)
Marital Status: Wife, Margy


I think we got a good one here, I don't know how long he'll be around though because he'll probably be a head coach again one of these days but he's a damn good coach.
 10 years ago '04        #22
1000bluntz  OP
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Also word is Urban just interviewed three more candidates for the vacant RB coach position but no names have surfaces as of yet.
 10 years ago '04        #23
Cap Peeler 7 heat pts
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NOTRE DAME FOOTBALL

JEFF CARROLL and BOB WIENEKE
Tribune Staff Writers

Originally expecting to be ready to play football by June, Notre Dame's safety recruit Dan McCarthy instead recently underwent corrective surgery on his neck and will likely use this season as a medical redshirt year.

McCarthy was injured in a high school playoff game for Youngstown, Ohio's Cardinal Mooney High, where he played both quarterback and safety.

McCarthy played the rest of the game the night he was injured, and actually found out about the severity of the injury the next day.

Click Here To Learn More
"When it first happened, I knew that something was definitely wrong," he said. "I got up and tried to shake it off, but the pain was still there.

"I knew it was a problem. I just wanted to take it as far as I could with it. Unfortunately, it was just until the rest of the game."

Hold please

Penn product Braxston Cave, when asked the most interesting thing he heard during his recruitment, had an unusual response, and it came courtesy of Florida coach Urban Meyer.

"(He) had me talk to his wife, so that was kind of interesting," Cave said.

The context of the conversation didn't exactly wow Cave.

"Basically, the weather and how they were on the boat and all this stupid crap," Cave said.

Cave, who played in the Under Armour All-America Game in Orlando last month, roomed with one-time Notre Dame commit Omar Hunter. Early that week, Hunter decommitted from Notre Dame and later in the month chose Florida.

The news of Hunter's decommitment, however, came a bit later to Cave than it did to most Irish fans.

"I actually didn't even know until like the last day, and he went home that same day, so I didn't really get to talk to him," Cave said. "But I'd rather him not be here than be half-hearted, you know?"

Urban doesn't stop !!!!!!!!!!!!

for all the hate I got for him and his staff i gotta respect his hustle. I swear this n*gga just don't be giving a fu*k
 10 years ago '04        #24
1000bluntz  OP
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Who really gives a fu*k what any kid that actually chooses to go to ND has to say? Urban is that n*gga, dude knows what the fu*k he's doing when it comes to this recruiting sh*t. This n*gga can talk all the sh*t he wants about the stupid crap they spewed to him but when the season starts and his team keeps getting their a.sses handed to them while it's below freezing and snowing let's see him talk then. ND obviously hates Florida more than most considering they thought Meyer was a lock to go there and then they get Weis and they still thought they got the better end of the deal . fu*k ND, they gotta be the worst recruiting staff in the nation. Fat fu*k Charlie Cheeseburger did his in home visit with Omar Hunter in November, yeah fu*king November . That's just flat out retarded. fu*k this kid, I hope he has fun playing in the snow instead of chilling with hoes in sunny Florida.
 10 years ago '04        #25
1000bluntz  OP
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Carter officially joins UF coaching staff

As expected, University of Florida football head coach Urban Meyer has announced the hiring of Kenny Carter to the Gator coaching staff. Carter spent the last four years at Vanderbilt where he coached running backs and served as the recruiting coordinator. On the Florida staff, he replaces Stan Drayton, who left UF shortly after the Capital One Bowl game for a position on another staff. (The Florida SID staff contributed to this report)

“I’m pleased to have Kenny join our staff,” said Meyer. “He has coached at two schools in the SEC and has a great understanding of what it takes to be successful in this league.”

“It is an honor to join The Gator Nation,” said Carter. “I’m excited about the opportunity and happy to be able to call Gainesville, Florida home for me and my family. I’m looking forward to working with Coach Meyer, the staff and the players. After talking to the current running backs at UF, I’m excited about the future.”

In 2006, Carter mentored tailbacks Cassen Jackson-Garrison and Jared Hawkins, a duo which combined for more than 900 rushing yards and eight touchdowns from the Commodores’ one-back set. Jackson-Garrison, who was a senior in 2007, went on to finish in a tie as the eighth-leading rusher in Vanderbilt history with 1,814 career yards. His 2007 running back corps of Jackson-Garrison, Hawkins and Jeff Jennings combined for 1,207 yards.

In 2005, he coached a youthful corps that included sophomore starter Jennings and Jackson-Garrison. Carter also mentored Steven Bright, who moved from quarterback to fullback/H-back and became a key offensive weapon as an aerial target out of the backfield.

Carter, who served as an a.ssistant at Furman when Bobby Johnson accepted the Paladins’ head coaching job, worked on coaching staffs at the University of Pittsburgh, LSU, The Citadel and Penn State prior to joining Vanderbilt.

At Penn State, Carter guided receivers under Joe Paterno. He was instrumental in the development of Bryant Johnson, a first-team All-Big Ten pick in 2002 and first-round 2003 NFL draft pick of the Arizona Cardinals. Johnson ranks among the all-time Penn State leaders with 110 career receptions and 2,008 career receiving yards.

Carter guided running backs at Pittsburgh under former coach Walt Harris, mentoring Kevan Barlow, Nick Goings and Lousaka Polite. Barlow became a 1,000-yard rusher at Pittsburgh and he has also played with the San Francisco and the New York Jets. Goings (Carolina) and Polite (Dallas, Chicago) have gone on to enjoy solid NFL careers.

Carter worked at LSU in 1999, coaching outside linebackers. One pupil, Norman Lejeune, was named Freshman All-SEC.

A native of Camden, S.C., Carter served as a tight ends’ a.ssistant at Furman in 1993. From 1994 through 1998 he held multiple positions at his alma mater, The Citadel.

Carter and his wife Bonnie are the parents of two children: Brey and Kennedy.

Kenny Carter
Coaching Experience

2004-07: Vanderbilt (Running Backs/Recruiting Coordinator)
2001-03: Penn State (Wide Receivers)
2000: Pittsburgh (Running Backs)
1999: LSU (Outside Linebackers)
1997-98: The Citadel (Assistant Head Coach)
1994-96: The Citadel (DE; RB; Recruiting Coordinator)
1993: Furman (Tight Ends)

Personal Information
Hometown: Camden, S.C.
Education: The Citadel (1990)
Marital Status: Wife, Bonnie
Children: Brey, Kennedy
 10 years ago '04        #26
1000bluntz  OP
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Gators add Vance Bedford to staff


GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- University of Florida head football coach Urban Meyer announced the hiring of Vance Bedford as cornerbacks’ coach Tuesday. Bedford comes to Gainesville after spending the 2007 season as the secondary coach at Michigan, where he had previously worked in the same capacity from 1995-98. Bedford has 15 years of collegiate coaching experience and spent six years coaching in the National Football League.

“I have worked with Vance at Colorado State when he was the defensive backs’ coach and could see that he had a bright future ahead of him at that point,” said Meyer. “He has coached at all levels, from high school to the NFL, and has a proven ability to work with and develop some of the top defensive backs in the nation. Vance will be a great addition to our coaching staff.”

“I am excited to be working with Coach Meyer again,” said Bedford. “We worked together at Colorado State under Coach Bruce and I’m eager to get to Gainesville and work with a championship program.”

Prior to spending last season in Ann Arbor, Bedford was the defensive coordinator at Oklahoma State (2005-06). Prior to his appointment with the Cowboys, Bedford coached in the NFL with the Chicago Bears. He was the defensive backs’ coach for the Bears for those six seasons (1999-2004). Bedford was instrumental in the development of cornerback Jerry Azumah and R.W. McQuarters and safety Mike Green, as well as 2003 NFL Rookie of the Year Charles Tillman. Bedford’s secondary returned seven interceptions for touchdowns during a four-year stretch, equaling the team’s total from the previous nine seasons combined.

During his first stint with the U-M program, Bedford’s pass defenses were rated among the nation’s best. Michigan led the nation in pass defense in 1997 and ranked 20th in 1996. The Wolverines’ 1997 national championship secondary, led by Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson, set an NCAA record allowing just 8.8 yards per completion and finished fifth nationally by allowing just 133.8 passing yards per contest. His secondary in 1997 led the Big Ten and finished third nationally with 22 interceptions.

Bedford began his coaching career at Forest Brook High School in Houston, Texas, in 1985. He moved into the collegiate ranks at Navarro
(Texas) Junior College in 1986, before accepting a position at Colorado State in 1987. Bedford was the Rams’ defensive backs’ coach under Earle Bruce for five seasons (1987-92), including a trip to the 1991 Freedom Bowl. His 1990 secondary set a school record and led the nation with 25 interceptions. Bedford worked with Meyer and current UF recruiting coordinator and cornerbacks’ coach Chuck Heater while at Colorado State.

He spent two seasons as the defensive backs coach at Oklahoma State (1993-94) before joining the UM staff.

A native of Beaumont, Texas, Bedford was a four-year letterman and starter at cornerback for the University of Texas (1977-79, 1981). He set a then-Longhorn season record for pass breakups with 22 in 1981 and is currently fifth on UT’s career pass breakup list (47). A two-time All-Southwest Conference second team selection, Bedford played in the Cotton and Sun bowls twice during his career. He was selected captain of the 1981 team and earned Most Valuable Player honors in the 1982 Senior Bowl All-Star game.

Bedford was selected in the fifth round of the 1982 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Cardinals. He played one season with the Cardinals (1982) and a year with the USFL’s Oklahoma Outlaws (1984) before embarking on a coaching career.

Bedford is married to the former Margaret Bulloch.

---

With the completion of the coaching staff, Coach Urban Meyer also announced the following responsibilities for the 2008 coaching staff.

Steve Addazio - a.ssistant Head Coach, Offense/Offensive Line
Vance Bedford - Cornerbacks
Kenny Carter - Running Backs
Billy Gonzales - Recruiting Coordinator/Wide Receivers
Chuck Heater - a.ssistant Defensive Coordinator/Safeties
John Hevesy - Tight Ends/Assistant Offensive Line
Dan McCarney - a.ssistant Head Coach, Defense/Defensive Line
Dan Mullen - Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks
Charlie Strong – Defensive Coordinator, a.ssociate Head
Coach/Linebackers


We are lucky to have this guy, he's really a damn good coach.
 10 years ago '04        #27
1000bluntz  OP
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FYI

Gameday will be at the Orange and Blue game and it's supposedly going to be shown live on ESPN. I'm not sure which ESPN channel is doing the game but hopefully it's not on ESPNU or I can't watch the sh*t. Should be some good pub for us.
 10 years ago '05        #28
booker20 
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 FSU Rhodes scholar said:
I never stated or even suggested that I had the ability to identify specific individuals involved in academic misconduct at FSU. The author asked me to implicate individuals, I explained that my knowledge is restricted to the systemic issues rather than specific names, he responded with a sensationalized story. I condemn his erroneous attack on the invaluable support provided by tutors, from which I personally benefited, and his a.ssault on the student-athletes and staff who comprise my FSU family. While I remain sceptical of the system, I will always be a proud Seminole and am committed to supporting FSU as we work to make a good program better.
Bianchi made alot of sh*t up....
 10 years ago '04        #29
1000bluntz  OP
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 booker20 said:
Bianchi made alot of sh*t up....
Rhodes scholar doesn't own up to comments
Mike Bianchi
February 29, 2008

You want to know the funny part?

The original intent was to write a fluffy, feel-good column about all the athletes who do things the right way.

That's why I contacted a representative from Florida State University's sports information department several days ago. I wanted to know if he could put me in touch with Garrett Johnson, a track and field national champion who two years ago became the second Rhodes scholar in FSU history.

Florida State sent me an e-mail address for Johnson, now in grad school in England at Oxford University. Johnson gave me his phone number and I called him.

It was during our 15-minute phone conversation that I asked him a throwaway question that I really didn't expect much of a response from: "As a student-athlete who has obviously done things the right way academically, are you concerned about the charges of academic misconduct at your alma mater?"

That's when he responded in a way that, quite frankly, startled me. "This [academic misconduct] is concerning not because of the negative attention it has brought on Florida State but because it wasn't a secret," he replied. "People knew what was going on. For people in the institution to take the position that they were unaware of the situation is untrue."

My journalistic rabbit ears perked up. I was both surprised and refreshed that an athlete actually had the intellectual confidence to question the integrity of his own school, not to mention the NCAA.

I then asked him an obvious follow-up question: Who in the institution might have known?

Johnson's reply: "I can't list specific allegations. I can't say who knew what. I'm just saying it was no secret. It's sort of like the Mitchell Report in baseball where the players are the ones being accused of taking steroids when everybody involved in baseball knew it was happening."

Johnson and I went on to talk about the systemic academic/athletic hypocrisy that plagues not only Florida State but most other NCAA schools. I included those quotes in my Wednesday column, too. I sent him a follow-up question via e-mail, and he replied. I quoted him on some of that stuff, too.

Why am I telling you all this? Because on Thursday, Garrett Johnson sent an e-mail to the Tallahassee Democrat saying I "misrepresented" his quotes. If you'll note in Johnson's e-mail to the Democrat, he never said he was misquoted, only "misrepresented."

There's a good reason for that: Because I had a follow-up phone conversation with Johnson on Tuesday and read him, word for word, every quote that would appear in the column.

I even allowed him to clarify his position on certain quotes. At his request, I didn't use an on-the-record comment he e-mailed to me because he felt the quote was too controversial and would insult politicians he had interned with in Tallahassee. When we hung up, he was agreeable to every quote in the column.

Now, after seeing the firestorm the column has created, his comments are suddenly "misrepresented."

I went above and beyond basic journalistic duties to make sure his quotes were accurate. I contacted FSU spokesperson Rob Wilson before the column ran and asked if the school would like to respond. Wilson declined.

Honestly, I don't know how I "misrepresented" Johnson's quotes. No, I didn't include every quote he told me, only those most newsworthy.

Will somebody please explain how you misrepresent this quote.

"This [academic misconduct] is concerning not because of the negative attention it has brought on Florida State, but because it wasn't a secret. People knew what was going on. For people in the institution to take the position that they were unaware of the situation is untrue."

Johnson emphasized in the e-mail to the Democrat that "I never stated or even suggested that I had the ability to identify specific individuals involved in academic misconduct at FSU."

I never said he did: In fact, I quoted him as saying, "I can't list specific allegations. I can't say who knew what. I'm just saying it was no secret."

I guess I should have expected this. This is, after all, what happens when an athlete says something one day and regrets it when it appears in the newspaper the next day.

Such an incident happened just a few weeks ago at the University of Florida when gymnast Maranda Smith, who happened to be the girlfriend of star football recruit Carl Moore, was quoted in the Gainesville Sun. She told the newspaper she spoke with UF football Coach Urban Meyer "every day back in November when he was recruiting Carl. He kept asking how Carl was doing and [he] wanted me to come [to UF] and do gymnastics."

A couple of days later, when it was learned that such regular phone contact might constitute an NCAA violation, the gymnast amended her quote and told the school newspaper that she and Meyer had "never had real phone conversations. I never even had a conversation with him."

I don't believe the gymnast's comments were misconstrued, just as I know Johnson's quotes weren't. Johnson is a well-known critic of the NCAA who has even written newspaper articles on the academic imbalance in big-time college athletics. He said what he said, and he meant what he said.

I'm saddened to hear Garrett Johnson thinks I misrepresented his comments, but maybe I should feel fortunate for one thing:

At least he didn't pull a Roger Clemens and say I "misremembered" them.

ORLANDO SENTINEL (ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)
 10 years ago '05        #30
booker20 
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 1000bluntz said:
Rhodes scholar doesn't own up to comments
Mike Bianchi
February 29, 2008

You want to know the funny part?

The original intent was to write a fluffy, feel-good column about all the athletes who do things the right way.

That's why I contacted a representative from Florida State University's sports information department several days ago. I wanted to know if he could put me in touch with Garrett Johnson, a track and field national champion who two years ago became the second Rhodes scholar in FSU history.

Florida State sent me an e-mail address for Johnson, now in grad school in England at Oxford University. Johnson gave me his phone number and I called him.

It was during our 15-minute phone conversation that I asked him a throwaway question that I really didn't expect much of a response from: "As a student-athlete who has obviously done things the right way academically, are you concerned about the charges of academic misconduct at your alma mater?"

That's when he responded in a way that, quite frankly, startled me. "This [academic misconduct] is concerning not because of the negative attention it has brought on Florida State but because it wasn't a secret," he replied. "People knew what was going on. For people in the institution to take the position that they were unaware of the situation is untrue."

My journalistic rabbit ears perked up. I was both surprised and refreshed that an athlete actually had the intellectual confidence to question the integrity of his own school, not to mention the NCAA.

I then asked him an obvious follow-up question: Who in the institution might have known?

Johnson's reply: "I can't list specific allegations. I can't say who knew what. I'm just saying it was no secret. It's sort of like the Mitchell Report in baseball where the players are the ones being accused of taking steroids when everybody involved in baseball knew it was happening."

Johnson and I went on to talk about the systemic academic/athletic hypocrisy that plagues not only Florida State but most other NCAA schools. I included those quotes in my Wednesday column, too. I sent him a follow-up question via e-mail, and he replied. I quoted him on some of that stuff, too.

Why am I telling you all this? Because on Thursday, Garrett Johnson sent an e-mail to the Tallahassee Democrat saying I "misrepresented" his quotes. If you'll note in Johnson's e-mail to the Democrat, he never said he was misquoted, only "misrepresented."

There's a good reason for that: Because I had a follow-up phone conversation with Johnson on Tuesday and read him, word for word, every quote that would appear in the column.

I even allowed him to clarify his position on certain quotes. At his request, I didn't use an on-the-record comment he e-mailed to me because he felt the quote was too controversial and would insult politicians he had interned with in Tallahassee. When we hung up, he was agreeable to every quote in the column.

Now, after seeing the firestorm the column has created, his comments are suddenly "misrepresented."

I went above and beyond basic journalistic duties to make sure his quotes were accurate. I contacted FSU spokesperson Rob Wilson before the column ran and asked if the school would like to respond. Wilson declined.

Honestly, I don't know how I "misrepresented" Johnson's quotes. No, I didn't include every quote he told me, only those most newsworthy.

Will somebody please explain how you misrepresent this quote.

"This [academic misconduct] is concerning not because of the negative attention it has brought on Florida State, but because it wasn't a secret. People knew what was going on. For people in the institution to take the position that they were unaware of the situation is untrue."

Johnson emphasized in the e-mail to the Democrat that "I never stated or even suggested that I had the ability to identify specific individuals involved in academic misconduct at FSU."

I never said he did: In fact, I quoted him as saying, "I can't list specific allegations. I can't say who knew what. I'm just saying it was no secret."

I guess I should have expected this. This is, after all, what happens when an athlete says something one day and regrets it when it appears in the newspaper the next day.

Such an incident happened just a few weeks ago at the University of Florida when gymnast Maranda Smith, who happened to be the girlfriend of star football recruit Carl Moore, was quoted in the Gainesville Sun. She told the newspaper she spoke with UF football Coach Urban Meyer "every day back in November when he was recruiting Carl. He kept asking how Carl was doing and [he] wanted me to come [to UF] and do gymnastics."

A couple of days later, when it was learned that such regular phone contact might constitute an NCAA violation, the gymnast amended her quote and told the school newspaper that she and Meyer had "never had real phone conversations. I never even had a conversation with him."

I don't believe the gymnast's comments were misconstrued, just as I know Johnson's quotes weren't. Johnson is a well-known critic of the NCAA who has even written newspaper articles on the academic imbalance in big-time college athletics. He said what he said, and he meant what he said.

I'm saddened to hear Garrett Johnson thinks I misrepresented his comments, but maybe I should feel fortunate for one thing:

At least he didn't pull a Roger Clemens and say I "misremembered" them.

ORLANDO SENTINEL (ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)
Slander.... Johnson should have this fat bald f*g fired....
 10 years ago '04        #31
1000bluntz  OP
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Dan McCarney has title aspirations

If there is anything you can take from the first media gathering with Florida defensive line coach Dan McCarney, it is that the man is not scared. He doesn’t mind one bit that he is coaching in a pressure-cooker situation, where the expectations are always going to be at a championship level. He has traveled a long road to get to Gainesville and the University of Florida and he’s ready to do his part to ensure that the Gators are always at the top.

To hear McCarney talk you know he has quite a college football pedigree. He played at the University of Iowa where he was a senior captain for Coach Hayden Fry. Two years after graduation he began a 13-year run as one of Fry’s Iowa a.ssistants, helping the Hawkeyes make it to eight straight bowl games. The lessons learned working for Fry, who was always considered one of the innovators in the college game, helped give McCarney a solid foundation for his coaching career.

At Iowa, McCarney was there to help Fry turn a program going nowhere into one of the most respected programs in the Big Ten. It seems that McCarney has developed a knack for helping turn around programs that were previously floundering.

Asked who had the greatest influence on his coaching career, McCarney emphatically replied, “Hayden Fry, no question!” McCarney left Iowa to serve as the defensive coordinator at Wisconsin when the Badgers made the Rose Bowl for the first time in more than 30 years. As the head coach at Iowa State, he turned that program from a doormat into one that was capable of competing. Last season, as the defensive line coach at South Florida, he turned a former center into one of the most feared defensive ends in the nation.

Fry had quite an eye for young coaching talent as his coaching tree bears out.

“I was one of the youngest division one a.ssistant coaches in college football,” he said. “[We had] Bill Snyder (turned Kansas State into a power), Barry Alvarez (turned Wisconsin into a power), Bobby Stoops (won a national championship at Oklahoma), Kirk Ferentz (succeeded Fry at Iowa), myself and bunch of young guns that nobody knew. When you are part of turnarounds and doing things at Iowa, Wisconsin, Iowa State, South Florida … when you do those things [that had never been done before] those are the memorable experiences you have and they make you a better coach.”

McCarney has lived his coaching life by embracing some good advice given him by Fry, starting with attention to detail. He also learned from Fry the art of making good a.ssistant coaching hires.

“One of the more important things was to hire good people, show a lot of faith and trust in them, and then turn them loose,” he said. “Here are my expectations, my goals, what I want from you, but then don’t be a micro-manager. I have faith and trust in you, now turn it loose.”

McCarney seems to coach his players in much the same way. When he has an exceptional talent, he doesn’t want limit what his star player can do. Under McCarney at South Florida, George Selvie was transformed from a virtual unknown even on his own team into one of the most feared defensive ends in all of college football at South Florida.

“He has talent, character, work ethic, and I just didn’t try to screw him up,” McCarney said in a joking but proud undertone. “He came a half tackle for loss away from the all-time NCAA record. He was in the top three or four in the country in sacks. It gives you some credibility.”

McCarney came to the Florida staff when Greg Mattison took a job with the Baltimore Ravens of the NFL. McCarney doesn’t feel a need to fix anything at Florida, just to maintain the level of excellence that Mattison brought to the coaching staff.

“Urban didn’t bring in a guy to experiment on the defensive line,” McCarney said. “He lost one of the great defensive line coaches in Greg Mattison and hopefully he feels like we aren’t going to miss a beat. That is my challenge. I am going to do everything I can to make Charlie Strong, Vance Bedford, Chuck Heater, Urban Meyer, and the fans proud that I am here. They don’t know much about me, but hopefully when we run off into the sunset of the 2008 season, they will say I am glad we brought him in here.”

Mattison preached the basics and fundamentals of the game to his players and McCarney plans to take the same route. He believes a strong foundation and a lot of effort are the active ingredients in a winning football player.

“Technique, fundamentals, tremendous effort … if you don’t give me all that you got, you will be standing on the sidelines with me,” he said with emphasis. “Those things are really important. I want to get into a real rotation. It is important. This past season I liked getting in there with my guys to let me know, tap their helmet ... I just need a play or two off. Don’t stay on the field and go 98 percent. It’s not good enough to win a championship.”

When Mattison left for the NFL a month ago, it was a no-brainer who should and would get the job. According to McCarney, he has been friends with Coach Meyer for quite some time. He sees a real give and take relationship with a boss and coach that he really respects. He plans to learn from Meyer and he’s got experience that Meyer can draw upon, too.

“Urban and I go back a lot of years even though I never coached with him or coached against him,” McCarney said. “We got to know each other in social situations and we have a lot of mutual respect. To get a chance to reunite with him, work with him, and be by his side, I am thrilled.

“As an a.ssistant, I spent many years making suggestions and as a head coach I spent many years making decisions. I think when you have sat in that chair and have handled a lot of those situations, hopefully I can bring something to Urban. Anything I can do to help him is great. He can lean on me as little or as much as he wants to. I am loyal to him, I am dedicated to him and I can’t wait to help him as much as I can.”

McCarney was hired the second week in February and so he has had a little over three weeks to get acclimated and learn whatever he can about the defense and the players he will be coaching. NCAA regulations mandate that the position coaches cannot spend time with the players during workouts of any kind outside of spring and fall practice periods, so McCarney is having to learn about his players from film and other sources. It is tough getting going in the beginning.

“A lot of things that Florida does under Charlie Strong’s leadership defensively is all new terminology and is all different,” McCarney said. “Then you have to get adapted … you have to learn. You have to know your players You want to build a relationship with them if you want to have good chemistry.”

That said, this is one of the most important times of the year for the players and McCarney wants his players to take advantage of everything they have at their disposal.

“Winter-time workouts, spring football … is such an important phase for any football team,” he said. “You are developing the heart the toughness, the chemistry, a lot of that is built this time of year. We have been on the fast track since I got here and am thrilled to be here.”

The only thing he does know about the players he inherited is that they supposedly have a lot of potential. He understands it is his responsibility to get them to reach that potential. There may be bumps along the road, but he loves the effort he has seen or heard about so far.

“We have a lot of players with a lot of stars behind their names, but let me tell you this is as good a work ethic and blue collar group as I have ever been around,” he said. “It is what I am used to and I love it. Everybody is going to work their tails off, coaches and players alike.”

In 2007 the defensive line was not a team strength by any means. Talent and consistency from both starting defensive end positions were offset by youth and inexperience in the middle of the line. Youth can be debilitating to a defense and is still something to be concerned with.

“They were one of the youngest defenses in the history of Florida football,” McCarney said. “It isn’t an excuse but they were just really young, especially in my unit so you can see why there was such a drop off from the year before. That is why we are here. There is no doubt there should be more maturity and experience coming back. In my unit on the line, there is only one senior in Javier (Estopinan) and he won’t go this spring because of his kne. Then there are two juniors in Jermaine (Cunningham) and (recent junior college transfer) Troy Epps. Epps got here just before I got here. This is still a young unit overall. But, I will tell you when you are there and get around Urban, the staff, and these players, this is a phenomenal situation.”

Meyer has already put the bullseye on McCarney and his troops. According to the new line leader, it is up to his boys for this to be a great season. McCarney welcomes the target and expects to come away with flying colors.

“There is a lot of potential but as Coach Meyer said up in the office, ‘The key to the 2008 season is Dan’s position and the job he does with those guys’,” McCarney said. “I know that and I love it and hopefully by the end of the 2008 season people will be real excited that I am here...We are a question mark, there is no doubt about it. When you look at talent, potential, experience, all of those things, there is a question mark right now. When the dust settles [on the season] hopefully [everyone] will be really proud that we have a great group here and this is a hell of a defensive line.”

Like Mattison, McCarney believes that the unit will improve as they work together. The harder they work, the closer they will become. The closer they get to one another the more they play for each other. This cohesiveness is something McCarney will really be striving for.
 10 years ago '04        #32
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Story continued...

“The most important thing is the chemistry, the togetherness, and the fit,” McCarney said. “Let’s roll our sleeves up, lets bring our lunch pail, lets go to work and lets make all the fans of the University of Florida football program really proud. I am honored to be here, we have two other outstanding football coaches that came in with me. We are going to do everything we can to ensure there is no drop off from performance with this staff under Urban. I am going to leave the program every day and know it is a better program because of my contribution. I don’t want anyone disappointed that I am here.”

Chemistry starts with his players doing right on and off the field. Recently some light has been shed on freshman defensive tackle Torrey Davis, which does not reflect positively on the University of Florida although this particular situation has been cleared to the coaches approval. Now, it is time to make sure they all understand what is expected of them from an off the field standpoint.

“Torrey Davis … I see him a lot,” McCarney said. “He is working out with the team. There is no doubt he has talent. I am going to do everything I can do to try and impact his life on and off the field.

“I stepped in and as a matter of getting to know these young men and them getting to know me, it isn’t going to happen over night. Obviously, it is real important that he is a great representative and ambassador for our university on and off the field. That is real important to me. I am no rookie. I have been doing this for a long time. I wasn’t brought in on a load of wood and I know what it takes to impact young men’s lives. Even though I had some chances --- once in the eighties and once in the nineties --- to go to the NFL, I love college football. One of the main reasons is the chance to impact young people.”

It is on the field where McCarney’s troops will be finally judged. He has to a.ssemble a young group into something that is going to make life miserable for opposing offenses. As of now, there are no givens as to who will start in game one and he plans on using a lot of players to bludgeon other teams. Again he points out that the season could ride on how well his defensive line performs.

“Jermaine Cunningham is a guy that started all last year,” said McCarney. “I love him. I am excited about him. He has a chance to be a special player. He was okay last year. He was solid, now he needs to go to the next level. There are lots of other guys that are in the mix right now, but this is as wide open as it gets. When I sit there in those meetings there is no fabrication of any motivational talk. It is as wide open as it has ever been. That part of it is exciting.

“I’d like to get into a 9-10 man rotation on the defensive line which means the attitude is good and morale is good with those guys. They know they are going to play in front of 92,000 every week and a national (TV) audience every week, You better be ready, better be locked in, better know your a.ssignments, not be costing us with mental errors. I like that part of it. It is a real challenge, a huge challenge, but it’s an exciting time. When you have an offense with all the pieces we have, you know you will be scoring some points and challenging for the SEC championship, which means you will be challenging for the national championship. It is going to come back to our defense, and I think especially our defensive line. That is what I am here for and I want to continue to build the great tradition that Greg Mattison started.”

All of this is going to take some work. There was certainly a bond between Mattison and the linemen that he coached. That bond now has to be replaced by one with a new coach who is undoubtedly going to do some things a little differently. McCarney certainly seems to know what it is going to take.

“I am not going to imitate anyone else, but Greg Mattison is a phenomenal coach,” he said. “We go back to the 70’s as friends and I want to try to continue to build on what he’s done here. You come here and look at the All-American boards, and see the best players in the history of University of Florida football, and look at the draft picks from the University of Florida. You see all the defensive linemen at the University of Florida ... what an unbelievable tradition. We want to build on that. We want to add to that. Who’s going to be the next All-American? Who’s going to be the next all-SEC? Who is going to be the next draft pick? Who’s going to be the next captain? Who’s going to be the next guy to fill in those shoes and be the guy that everyone else under him, younger than him, will look to and say I really want to be like that guy?”

Recruiting is another aspect that McCarney seems to relish. But first, he had to tie up some loose ends when Mattison suddenly jettisoned after signing day. There may have been some hurt feelings and a bit of the unknown that came over a few of the defensive line signees. McCarney took the bull by the horns and is extremely excited to see his new troops when they arrive.

“I have talked to all of them a number of times,” he said. “I can’t wait to get them I wish they could get here tonight, because I can’t wait to coach them.”

For the rest of his recruiting duties, McCarney is quick to point out that the University of Florida sells itself. He understands that just the school name can get this staff in so many living rooms to talk to mom and dads. He wants to take full advantage of that. He will start out recruiting an area he is very familiar with.

“It sounds like it will be in Tampa,” McCarney said. “We have a great academic institution, a world class university, one of the great traditions in the history of college football and one of the most dynamic head coaches in America. When you talk about 92,000 every home game, this is a pretty unique place, a special place.

“I don’t try to imitate anyone. You be yourself, and build relationships with young people. No matter where you go in America, good recruiters are good recruiters. You build trust, respect, you build relationships. You get to know families, girlfriends, mothers, fathers ... but, this is one of the few places in America that all of us are in this profession know that no matter where you go in America you will have a real genuine shot at any young man because of the history of this place, the success, and the national championship just a few months ago.”

Recruiting the Tampa area could make it tough. The University of South Florida was his former employer and so he may end up going head to head in some recruiting battles before it is all over. Even though the two schools rarely square off for the same prospects, McCarney understands what he must do.

“I love (USF Head Coach) Jim Leavitt,” he said. “I love that staff ... you think it wasn’t that hard to leave but it was. It isn’t easy to just turn and walk away for Florida, for a place that might have a little more money and resources. But this is my boss ... Urban Meyer. This is my program. This is my university. This is my team ... the Gators. The line has been drawn in the sand. This is where my heart is at and I am going to do everything I can here.”

There is always that next chance that will likely come along to be a head coach somewhere and McCarney will not deny that it is something that he will consider. Still, there is no place he would rather be at the current status he is in, than the University of Florida.

“I had a chance to be a head coach in recent weeks and re-start a program from scratch,” he said. “When I was let go at Iowa State a couple of years ago, there were 24 coaches let go that year. None of them resurfaced as head coaches … only a half dozen of us surfaced as a.ssistant coaches. We had a lot of choices this year, over a dozen opportunities to change jobs, but this was our number one choice and opportunity. When Urban called the day after signing day and said there might be an opportunity here, I sat up straight up in my chair, Margy and I talked and I said God bless it. There is probably only one opportunity to go to the University of Florida and we aren’t going to say no if we get that chance.

“You know one thing, if they do it at Florida it is done first class. To be by Urban’s side and to learn from him ... and hopefully bring another national championship, that is why all of us are here. The expectations are really high, but we all embrace them. One of the great things about this job, is I come here every day and I can’t wait to get here. All four programs I was at before --- Iowa, Wisconsin, Iowa State, and South Florida --- we all made the top ten at one time or another, but we never won a national championship. That is the number one reason I came here, to help Urban win another national championship.”
 10 years ago '04        #33
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 booker20 said:
Slander.... Johnson should have this fat bald f*g fired....
I don't like the little f*g**t either, he hates on UF in this story just to make it look like he doesn't hate FSU or whatever but it ain't like he's Templeton on The Wire either, he wouldn't make up sh*t to write a story as gay as he is.
 10 years ago '05        #34
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 1000bluntz said:
it ain't like he's Templeton on The Wire either, he wouldn't make up sh*t to write a story as gay as he is.
 10 years ago '04        #35
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Carter says Florida was a no-brainer


The question wasn’t difficult or tricky and it certainly didn’t catch Kenny Carter by surprise. He was expecting someone to ask why he left Vanderbilt for a coaching position at the University of Florida and his answer was so self-assured, so confident that it left no doubt that he’s coaching at a place he always wanted to be.

“It’s Florida,” Carter said sternly. “It’s that simple. It’s not a difficult thing. It’s kind of a no-brainer. If you’re a competitor and want to be in a place to win a national championship, this is one of the places in the country that at the start of every season you have that opportunity.”

Talking the talk off the field at a press conference is simple. Using “one game at a time” and “give it all we have” only go so far for Kenny Carter. He’s a don’t tell me what you can do but show me what you can do type of coach. He can’t wait to coach them on the practice field but he’s also eager to coach his new protégés in the game of life, too.

“Everybody aspires to be at the pinnacle of their profession,” said Carter, who was recently named to replace Stan Drayton as the running backs coach on the University of Florida football staff. “That’s what I felt like Florida is. If you have an opportunity to coach at one of the best schools in the country, why not take that chance? Go in there and not only coach there, but try to be a difference maker.”

Carter has only been in Gainesville a short time but he well aware that he inherits a group of fast, athletic and talented running backs. Florida fans have already anointed Southern Cal transfer Emmanuel Moody as the next great Florida tailback, but Carter isn’t ready to name anyone as “the man” quite yet.

“It would be very presumptuous of me to say one name because I haven’t gone through spring practice with them,” Carter said. “We’ve done running and all and you see things happen to formulate things to focus on. Honestly, the things I focus on early are the guy’s weakness. That’s what I’m going to attack. Then I’ll see guys who are stepping up. They’ve been challenged individually to step up. Somebody’s got to be the man. You don’t come here to not be the man. They know more than one will play so we’ll see. We’ll know real quick who will be the number one.”

The Gators had some problems at tailback last year. Mon Williams tore an ACL back in the spring so he was lost for the year. Chris Rainey had to have shoulder surgery. Kestahn Moore had some problems with fumbles. Percy Harvin was Florida’s best wide receiver but the lack of production at tailback forced him to become the most effective tailback, too.

Carter wants improved production at the position although he’s not sure that it’s a necessity to have one player handling the bulk of the duties.
“Value is relative,” Carter said. “It depends on how you are contributing to the ultimate goal. If we are doing the things that we need to do to win then our value is high. If we’re being more productive than the past then we’re doing better. If we have one guy who rushes for over 1,000 yards, outstanding. If we have a collection of guys that rush for 1,000 yards then we’re getting production from the position and that’s what is most important.”

Carter disagrees with the contention the Gators lacked a true running back last season. The perception, he says, doesn’t match up with the reality.

“We do have running backs, and we have good running backs,” Carter said. “I’m a big believer that the perception isn’t everything. We are very excited about the young people we have. Some of the young guys you haven’t seen. There are some good players here and they’re going to get their carries and opportunities.”

For the last two seasons, quarterback Tim Tebow has been Florida’s tough yardage runner. Carter sees the value in a mobile quarterback but he wants his running backs to be equally capable of moving the chains.

“When you have your quarterback running the ball and he gets nicked up, you try to take some of (the pressure) off him,” Carter said. “But the guy won the Heisman as a sophomore. You don’t take things away from your program that gives you an opportunity to win games. If Tim has to run the ball in certain situations, so be it. He’s a very good football player. But we’re going to do our part that when third and one comes around we don’t have to run a quarterback counter. We can run some other things to take that load off him.”

When Carter came to Gainesville to interview for the opening on Urban Meyer’s coaching staff Tebow sat in on the interview. That showed Carter what a leader Tebow is.

“If you want someone to win the Heisman as a sophomore, this is the guy,” said Carter. “What a great young man. That’s who you want to lead your program.”

If there is one thing that stands out about Meyer’s approach to a coaching staff, it is the head coach’s insistence that his a.ssistants are involved in every aspect of the players’ lives. Carter has never been a part of a system where the a.ssistants are expected to be so heavily involved with their players.
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Story continued...


“That’s really good and a great deal for us,” Carter said. “It’s one thing to see the players come up to your office and at the practice field, but it’s another to work out with them or spend time at lunch with them. Walk over to Chris Rainey’s dorm to make sure that he understands you care about him more than just what he does on the field. That was probably the biggest thing that’s stood out to me in my transition.”

On the field, the processing of getting to know his players remains the same as off it. That’s exactly why he is itching to get his players on the practice field.

“We are really trying to get to know each other,” Carter said. “We want to find out the strengths and weaknesses of each man. We want to put all those things together where we can make one pool of a unit that becomes what we want, and that’s one of the better running back position groups in the country. That’s what Florida is about. Having the best. Will it happen this year? Next year? We don’t know that, but our goal is to be the best in the country.”

Carter will finally get his chance to fully evaluate his charges when the Gators begin spring practice March 19 but in the meantime, he’s building relationships.

“In any business, regardless of what it is, the number one priority is personnel, developing personnel and building relationships with personnel,” Carter said. “The same day I accepted the job, I had a conversation with every one of my players. From that day on, I had a conversation with every one of my players. The day I stepped foot on campus we had already established a chain of conversations that will lead up to what we do in spring practice and then the summer and season.”

Moody is Florida’s most anticipated running back in years. His combination of size and speed is rarely found and Carter can’t wait to see what he can do on the practice field.

“He’s very athletic, he’s very fast and he’s very strong,” Carter said. “He’s one of the stronger backs that I’ve ever been around. He’s got a little quad contusion that he’s work through. There are a lot of things he brings to the table. You don’t start at Southern Cal and not be the real deal.”

Fans will expect Moody to dominate from day one but Carter has a plan in place for Moody and all of his running backs. He wants to be certain that Moody isn’t caught up in all the hype.

“I make sure that he understands he’s competing with Chris Rainey, Mon Williams and the rest of them,” Carter said. “The pressure isn’t on him. The pressure is on our position group. That’s what has to step up and get it done. If he’s got any pressure, it’s going to come from me. If he’s not producing and doing the things he’s supposed to do, he’s not going to get the carries he wants to get. There’s no pressure besides doing your job.”

Mon Williams carried the weight of expectation into last year’s spring practice but he tore his ACL on the first day. He’s worked hard to rehab the knee and Carter sees the big back from Texas making valuable contributions in the fall.

“He’s real good,” Carter said. “He had to get to the point mentality where once the scar tissue broke up and everything was gone, he’d say ‘I’m ready.’ That’s tough. If you have a knee injury, you have mental hoops you have to jump through. He’s jumped through those hoops and he’s been encouraged to.”

What Carter would really like to do is use all of his backs because all of them bring something different to the table. Moody is a powerful slasher while Rainey is a breakaway type that has another gear when he gets in the secondary. Mon Williams is a combination of power and speed while Kestahn Moore has shown that he is versatile enough to run the ball, catch passes and take on blitzing linebackers.

“It’s all about when you get the ball, you make something happen,” Carter said. “You make a difference. That’s what we’re focusing on. You can’t get tackled in the open field by one person. Be productive in one-on-one situations and make plays.”

When it comes to recruiting, Carter says he isn’t about to promise a high school running back immediate carries in the Florida offense. The player he is looking for is the type that will come in and be a team player.

“You don’t sell anything,” Carter said. “You make sure that young people know, this is what we do. If you want to be part of a championship team and you want to contribute, you do that here. When you start selling to a kid that you’ll do this and that, if they need that to get them here, and being part of the team isn’t important, then you’re starting out on the wrong foot. They will know. They’ll have the opportunities because the head coach says they will.”

For the next few weeks Carter will be doing his best to get settled in Gainesville before the busy spring practice schedule sets in. It won’t take him as long as most coaches though. In fact, his wife is used to the moves.

“My wife can do this things with her eyes closed and hands behind her back,” Carter said. “This is school number seven and third SEC one. There’s nothing to it. If you can’t handle the heat in this league, you can’t don’t need to come in the kitchen.”
 10 years ago '04        #37
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Bedford: no sales pitch was required


It didn’t take long for Vance Bedford to notice one of the huge built-in advantages he will have when he’s recruiting football players to the University of Florida. Almost as soon as he stepped off the plane, Bedford knew he could get used to Florida’s warmer weather and abundance of sunshine.

“I got in at 11:30 yesterday so I haven’t met my guys yet,” Bedford said Thursday afternoon at a meet the new coaches affair at the F Club offices in the north end zone of The Swamp. “I’ve been up since 4:30 a.m. yesterday and hitting the ground running. I got to the airport yesterday and it was -15 wind chill. I got down here off the plane and the sun was shining. I called my wife and told her it was 55 degrees and I was sweating. I’m fired up!”

Bedford has been brought in to coach the cornerbacks. He brings NFL experience to the Florida coaching staff but he’s best known for his body of work at Michigan. During his first tour of duty in Ann Arbor, he was the position coach for Charles Woodson, the standout cornerback who is the only defensive player to ever win the Heisman Trophy. Bedford was in his second tour at Michigan as part of Lloyd Carr’s Michigan coaching staff when the Wolverines beat the Gators in the Capital One Bowl back on New Year’s Day.

The combination of Carr’s retirement and Florida safeties coach Doc Holliday taking the job as a.ssistant head coach at his alma mater (West Virginia) created an opening on the Florida staff and it wasn’t the least bit surprising that Coach Urban Meyer turned his attention to Bedford. Bedford’s ties to Meyer and the Florida staff run deep.

Bedford was the secondary coach for Earl Bruce at Colorado State in the early 1990s. Meyer was the wide receivers coach on that staff and the defensive coordinator was Chuck Heater, who coached the Florida corners the last three years. Heater has become the a.ssistant defensive coordinator and he’s moved over to coach the safeties to make room on the staff for Bedford.

Florida wide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator Billy Gonzales was a wide receiver at Colorado State when Bedford was in Fort Collins. Yet another tie to Florida is former co-defensive coordinator and defensive line coach Greg Mattison, who has taken a position with the Baltimore Ravens in the NFL. Mattison was the defensive coordinator at Michigan for a couple of years and Bedford was his secondary coach. Mattison left for a position on the Notre Dame staff the year that Woodson won the Heisman Trophy.

Meyer didn’t have to do a sales job to convince Bedford to become a Gator but now that Bedford has joined the Florida staff, he’s had an endless stream of support from friends and colleagues telling him the job in Gainesville is the perfect fit for his coaching talents.

“There was no pitch,” Bedford said. “I left one of the greatest universities that you can go to and come to another one that’s the same way. I’ve been getting calls from friends and a.ssociates saying what a great opportunity this is, and that’s the way I look at it. This is an opportunity a lot of people wish they had and you can’t pass it up.”

Helping him make the decision was what he saw of the Gators while helping prepare Michigan prepare for the Capital One Bowl. He didn’t see a lot of experience in the Florida secondary but he saw young, athletic players with plenty of speed.

The Gators struggled last year, largely due to youth and inexperience. Bedford sees a group that is capable of building on last year to become an outstanding unit.

“They didn’t have many veterans [in 2007] so I’m excited to be here and work with young, talented people,” Bedford said. “When I was at Michigan last year we had a true freshman starting for us. Florida had the same this past year. I see a bright future for the guys here.”

The natural a.ssumption is that a year of experience and the infusion of energy from a new coach will help the Gators patch up what was a leaky secondary in the fall of 2008. Bedford has worked with young, inexperienced players before and he’s had success but he’s quick to point out that there are no magic bullets.

“I don’t see many problems there,” Bedford said. “I see a very young team, and once they get more experience they’re going to get better. These guys are very athletic and can run. When I first went to Michigan in 1995 I had Charles Woodson starting as a freshman. But in 1997 we had a split national championship and I had three true freshmen play and two true freshmen starting that game. So you can play with young guys. The biggest thing is, if they’re mentally tough, they can play. We’ve got the athleticism here.”

Bedford likes the idea of working in tandem with Heater. Because they have already worked together, there should be no surprises and the familiarity should help them when they bounce ideas off each other in practice and the film room.

“We had a lot of fun at Colorado State together,” said Bedford. “It was short lived and I wish it could’ve been longer, but I had an opportunity to learn from Chuck. The opportunity we have together is exciting.

“We’ll mix and match. He has more opportunities to go up front and work there with me taking the corners, but we’re going to spend a lot of time together in drills and meetings.”

Bedford isn’t the only new coach on the defensive side for the Gators. Dan McCarney, the former Wisconsin defensive coordinator and Iowa State head coach, joined the Florida staff just before National Signing Day. The Gators lost two outstanding coaches in Mattison and Holliday but Bedford and McCarney not only bring outstanding credentials to the table, but new energy and plenty of new ideas

“When you have someone new come in, he brings some new ideas and some change,” Bedford said. “I think Dan McCarney is going to bring some too. We’re going to sit back and throw ideas off each other. I think the defense has done a terrific job over the past two years. People will complain a little bit about this year that they were down … well you had a young football team. When they won the national championship with a bunch of veterans nobody said a word. The defense is going to get back to where it used to be, simply because we’re going to get older. Instead of a freshman-sophomore team on defense, we’re going to be a sophomore-junior team.”

Bedford’s experience in the National Football League can only help the Gators, both on the field and in the recruiting wars. He spent six years coaching the secondary of the Chicago Bears, working with former Gator Todd Johnson during that time. The time he spent in the league was a learning experience for him and he feels he is a better coach for it.

“Spending time in the NFL as a coach gave me the chance to develop,” Bedford said. “Even though guys are in the NFL you still have to break things down for them. You still have to treat them like they’re young guys. Coming back to college, now I understand young guys better. It taught me to slow down and not be in a rush.”

The main difference between college football and the NFL is recruiting. Coaches don’t have to recruit in the NFL but recruiting is the lifeblood of the college game. While he was at the Capital One Bowl, Bedford saw how hard and how seriously the Gators go about recruiting.

“I remember being at the bowl game and these coaches here were working the phones calling recruits,” said Bedford. “That’s what Urban brings to the table. That’s why you have an opportunity to win. You win with players. Then you have to coach them after you get them.”

The Meyer approach to recruiting can be summed up with one word: relentless. Every effort is made to evaluate every prospect for talent and character. Meyer doesn’t back down from recruiting battles. His four recruiting classes have pitted the Gators head to head with the top programs in the country and Meyer always expects to come out a winner.

“We’re going to be recruiting against schools like Miami, Florida State, USC,” Bedford said. “You have to be out there and outwork them. You have to make the calls and write the letters. You can’t sit back and say ‘well I’m at the University of Florida.’ Then Miami’s going to get a kid or Florida State will grab a kid. We have to sell kids that we are definitely going win here.”

Now that Bedford has arrived in Gainesville, he only has about three weeks to get settled before spring practice begins. Getting his wife moved down to Gainesville is his main concern, but after that it turns to his players. He will begin to closely pick their games apart to find out what their strengths and weaknesses are.

“The key term is evaluating what we have,” Bedford said. “I get a good feel of what they can and can’t do. Once we get closer to two-a-days I can have a better idea of what these guys can and can’t do. That will let me make decisions about their skills on the field.”
 10 years ago '04        #38
1000bluntz  OP
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Apparently James Wilson is transferring. I just don't get this sh*t, this kid has got to be a pus*y from everything I've heard and read.
 10 years ago '04        #39
1000bluntz  OP
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I guess Wilson is about gone, good we don't need oversized v*ginas on our roster. Kid quits right before Spring ball starts, what a fu*king sissy man.
 10 years ago '04        #40
Cap Peeler 7 heat pts
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 1000bluntz said:
I guess Wilson is about gone, good we don't need oversized v*ginas on our roster. Kid quits right before Spring ball starts, what a fu*king sissy man.
That's already 5 players transferring out man along with Chevon Walker and Bo Williams, receiver Jarred Fayson, quarterback Bryan Waggener. What's going bluntz?? These kids are realizing that all of Meyer's fantasies that he offered during their recruitment are just straight up lies.

Next in line of transfers: Deonte Thompson.

And i know you see that coming sooner rather than later....
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