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The Official Organized Crime Thread pt2(news, docs, discussion ect)


 
 


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section Just Wild Ish
  
 1 month ago '16        #701
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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there have always been rumors that Joey had been diagnosed with cancer before he died and that's why he was out on his bday in borderline enemy territory(Umberto's was owned by his friend Matty the horse but was a late night hangout for a lot of Colombo's) with one bodyguard.........he looks pretty sickly in this pic imo........

 1 month ago '16        #702
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Michael Spilotro on the set of Magnum PI............





Dean Martin, Greg DePalma and Richie Nerves Fusco............





Greg DePalma and Liz Taylor(yes, he was hitting)............





Im sure its been posted but fu*k it...starting from left, Big Paul, Greg DePalma, Frank, Carlo, jimmy the weasel and Richie Fusco on the bottom right...........

a lot of BIG money in that shot............
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 1 month ago '16        #703
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Neil Dellecroce and Frank.............





Sonny Red and Bruno Indellicato.............





Dame Canalichio(Philly), Anthony DonatoColombos), Bobby Lino Jr and Bruno Indelicato(Bonnanos)...........

Bruno has had a fu*ked up life..............
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 1 month ago '16        #704
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Gennaro"Jerry Lang" Langella being interrogated at 24............





Fat Tony, Tony Ducks and Allie Persico in prison...........





a more recent pic of Frank Cali before he was k*lled...........





former Philly Underboss Mousie Massimino and son............





Joey and Dom(current and probably future Philly boss)





Salvie and joe Punge..............





Joe Punge now.............

what a fu*ked position he was in......set up his best friend to be k*lled or be k*lled along with Salvie, and his dad and brother...........Scarfo had just had the Narducci's shoot a civilian that was the father of a rat they couldn't get to, so he for sure knew Nicky wouldn't hesitate to k*ll him, his dad, and brother who were all made..........

 1 month ago '16        #705
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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I just noticed that the pic of Joey and Dom is strikingly similar to Salvie and Joe Punge's as far as body language and faces are concerned...........

 1 month ago '16        #706
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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ohh sh*t..........

Hamilton police say crash in front of Musitano home may have mob connection
By Don Mitchell

Police say an investigation into a hit and run car crash on Monday in Central Hamilton has now been taken over by the Major Crime and Intelligence Units.


The change comes as Hamilton police say the crash happened not far from the driveway of reputed mobster Pat Musitano’s home on St. Clair Boulevard between Cumberland Avenue and Delaware Avenue.

A 76-year-old driver of a Buick was transported to hospital with minor injuries after colliding with a Mercedes in the incident. Police say suspects “were seen fleeing on foot, northbound on St. Clair and then westbound on Delaware” after the crash.

READ MORE: Hamilton police looking for suspects after hit and run sends driver to hospital

Investigators believe the Buick driver may have been spooked by “an observation,” which caused his car to leave the driveway suddenly “in a dangerous manner,” before colliding head-on with the southbound Mercedes.

Detectives say they are getting little cooperation from the parties involved in the car crash, though, particularly the Buick driver.



fu*king crazy he's not in hiding........people tied to him have been getting shot almost left and right since Pat himself was shot............

the old man in the Buick is a smart guy...........
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 1 month ago '10        #707
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
I just noticed that the pic of Joey and Dom is strikingly similar to Salvie and Joe Punge's as far as body language and faces are concerned...........
dom is an interesting cat to me. i read he's been flipping houses like crazy in philly which seems like a good hustle, philly is the last affordable city on the east coast. they gotta be building a case on him though.. anything ever happen after his crib got vandalized? i remember reading about that but no follow up. i doubt he would just let that slide
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 1 month ago '10        #708
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
ohh sh*t..........

Hamilton police say crash in front of Musitano home may have mob connection
By Don Mitchell

Police say an investigation into a hit and run car crash on Monday in Central Hamilton has now been taken over by the Major Crime and Intelligence Units.


The change comes as Hamilton police say the crash happened not far from the driveway of reputed mobster Pat Musitano’s home on St. Clair Boulevard between Cumberland Avenue and Delaware Avenue.

A 76-year-old driver of a Buick was transported to hospital with minor injuries after colliding with a Mercedes in the incident. Police say suspects “were seen fleeing on foot, northbound on St. Clair and then westbound on Delaware” after the crash.

READ MORE: Hamilton police looking for suspects after hit and run sends driver to hospital

Investigators believe the Buick driver may have been spooked by “an observation,” which caused his car to leave the driveway suddenly “in a dangerous manner,” before colliding head-on with the southbound Mercedes.

Detectives say they are getting little cooperation from the parties involved in the car crash, though, particularly the Buick driver.



fu*king crazy he's not in hiding........people tied to him have been getting shot almost left and right since Pat himself was shot............

the old man in the Buick is a smart guy...........
just read some more articles on this.. the car had 3 younger black dudes in it. possibly haitians since it seems like they came from montreal and their history with the mob, but it looks like somalians (i think) have been getting involved. the guy charged with k*lling angelo musitano i believe is somalian? unless you heard otherwise, i'm just going off his name
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 1 month ago '16        #709
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 t from the 617 said
dom is an interesting cat to me. i read he's been flipping houses like crazy in philly which seems like a good hustle, philly is the last affordable city on the east coast. they gotta be building a case on him though.. anything ever happen after his crib got vandalized? i remember reading about that but no follow up. i doubt he would just let that slide
he’s to have supposed to have been indicted like the last 3 summers but nothings ever came.......the only person that could really, really bury him is doing his time with his mouth closed........there was a lot of talk that he may be acting skipper for the South Jersey crew and that at least one if not two(including the informant, a.p.) were reporting to him but I don't think directly in the rats case.........Joey Electric's tapes are confusing cuz he mentions having to ask a "kid"(Dom) permission to do sh*t and then he also says that the "old man"(Scoops) wants him to stay out of AC....so theres a lot of conflicting sh*t there cuz he's not answering to two captains, and I know that Sammy Piccolo answered directly to Dom but given the fact that Dom's dad set up Sammy in the 80's in a big coke bust I doubt that he'd do the same to Dom who is his little cousin or possibly nephew, idk its confusing but Dom's mom is a Piccolo..............

as far as his house getting vandalized it was a drunken thing over a girl or some sh*t........not sure if anything came about it yet.........but somebody will take a beating if they already haven't.........


Last edited by smokeytheblunt2; 07-24-2019 at 04:22 PM..

 1 month ago '16        #710
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 t from the 617 said
just read some more articles on this.. the car had 3 younger black dudes in it. possibly haitians since it seems like they came from montreal and their history with the mob, but it looks like somalians (i think) have been getting involved. the guy charged with k*lling angelo musitano i believe is somalian? unless you heard otherwise, i'm just going off his name
i’m not sure to be honest..........

 1 month ago '16        #711
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
Suspected mob boss k*ller thought victim was ‘prominent member of the deep state’
By Chris Perez July 22, 2019

The man accused of gunning down a Mafia kingpin on Staten Island wasn’t intending to k*ll a mob boss that day, his lawyer says.

In his eyes, Anthony Comello was taking out “a prominent member of the deep state” — whom he allegedly tried to “arrest” at first.

“He ardently believed that Francesco Cali, a boss in the Gambino crime family, was a prominent member of the deep state, and, accordingly, an appropriate target for a citizen’s arrest,” said Comello’s attorney, Robert C. Gottlieb, in court documents filed Friday.

“Mr. Comello became certain that he was enjoying the protection of President Trump himself, and that he had the president’s full support,” Gottlieb added, according to the New York Times.

The 24-year-old had been convinced that Cali was connected to the infamous QAnon conspiracy, which claims there’s a political “deep state” secretly running the country from within the government, among other things.

“Mr. Comello’s support for ‘QAnon’ went beyond mere participation in a radical political organization,” his lawyer said. “It evolved into a delusional obsession.” Gottlieb intends to argue in court that Comello’s delusions about the QAnon conspiracy drove him to commit murder — and that they are enough to prove he is not guilty by reason of insanity. He’s seeking to have Comello placed in psychiatric care, rather than prison.

According to Gottlieb, the young man’s obsession with the “deep state” and other QAnon conspiracies — like the belief that certain Democratic politicians are secretly pedophiles — led to him making multiple “arrest” attempts earlier this year.

In February, Comello allegedly tried to take Mayor de Blasio into custody on two separate occasions, one of which involved him showing up at Gracie Mansion. He then attempted to place two California Democrats under arrest — Reps. Maxine Waters and Adam Schiff — and even tried getting the US Marshal Service to help. But they reportedly denied his request.

The incidents were later confirmed by law enforcement officials.

Over the years, Comello made “thousands and thousands” of posts, messages and forum comments about the QAnon conspiracies, which Gottlieb plans to use in court as evidence.

“Patriot sleeper cells are awake,” he wrote on one occasion.

Gottlieb said Comello believed that Cali, a member of the Gambino crime family, had been connected to the deep state after seeing a post online that suggested Mafia figures were also part of the conspiracy.

He is accused of k*lling the mob boss on March 13 outside his Todt Hill home. The slaying was believed to be “premeditated” — with prosecutors charging Comello with second-degree murder.

“The defendant fired 12 bullets, striking him 11 times,” said Staten Island a*sistant district attorney Carrie Low at Comello’s bail hearing. “He drove by the victim’s house several times hours before the attack.”

During his first court appearance in March, Comello showed up with his palm covered in drawings of symbols and phrases tied to QAnon. Low described him at the time as a member of the “far-right organization.”

“He believes that only their laws are the laws he and the rest of this country should follow,” she said.

Comello is due back in court on Aug. 13.



one of the things that's come out of the Italy arrests is that they really want that kid dead over there..........

the longer he goes untouched the bigger the possibility that his family will...........
don't know the validity of this but supposedly there are police documents that state that not only did this involve his niece but she was win fact present at the house.............

so if thats the case the dude's insanity plea is sunk.............

 1 month ago '16        #712
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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A new incident earlier this week in Hamilton, a suburb of Toronto, reinforces the hypothesis of some collaboration between Ontario and Quebec mafia clans.

At approximately 4:30 pm Monday, a Mercedes carrying three individuals circulated on St. Clair Boulevard, in front of Pat Musitano's residence, a prominent Ontario Mafia clan leader - formerly linked to the Sicilians - who escaped a spectacular murder attempt last April.

Presumably worried about the passing of this suspicious vehicle, a 76-year-old man, who was in a Buick car parked in the entrance to Mr. Musitano's residence, pressed the accelerator and hit.

As a result of the impact, the three occupants of the Mercedes, one of whom was wearing a mask, fled on foot while removing clothes, leaving their vehicle behind. The septuagenarian who was driving the Buick was slightly injured. He refused to collaborate with the investigators.

Later, an individual describing himself as the owner of the Mercedes introduced himself to the police. He was arrested and charged with conspiracy for murder and leaving the scene of an accident.

We do not know for the moment the identity of the man who is 25 years old, lives in the Saint-Hubert borough in Longueuil and has no criminal record in Quebec.

The young man was not very cooperative and was released under conditions, pending further proceedings. It has also been established that the Mercedes vehicle comes from the Saint-Hubert borough.

The Hamilton police are investigating this case, which appears to show links or, at the very least, a new exchange of services between criminal groups in Ontario and Quebec.

Québec labor force

This is at least the fourth event in two years in which an Ontario criminal is targeted and where the suspects have a connection with Quebec.

The police observed suspects aboard a car registered in Quebec before Angelo Musitano, brother of Pat, was murdered on May 2, 2017.

On January 30, the nephew of former Montreal Mafia boss Paolo Violi, Cece Luppino, was murdered at his home in Hamilton by a suspect whom the police believe to be a Quebecker.

In recent months, four Montrealers have been arrested and charged with the murder of Michael Deabaitua-Schulde, a 32-year-old Hells Angel who was k*lled on March 11 when he was leaving a Mississauga training room.

A source told La Presse that the use of Quebeckers for settling accounts in Ontario could mean a rapprochement between criminal groups of the two provinces and aim to confuse the tracks by using the labor of a province. other province.

Several murders or attempted murders have occurred recently in organized crime in Ontario. Sources mention a power struggle between mafia clans and a conflict in the sports betting world.

Towards new tensions?

The large-scale Sindicato operation last week by York police against the Figliomeni clan, one of the largest in Ontario, could cause further tension.

Hamilton police say the three black suspects on board the Mercedes were hit in front of Pat Musitano's residence on Monday, aged between 25 and 30 years. Two of them are about 6 feet tall and are described as having an athletic body.



that 76 year old man seems like he might be Pat's bodyguard...........

 1 month ago '16        #713
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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What clues were left in car hit in front of Hamilton mobster Pat Musitano’s house?

Hamilton police hoping possible DNA, electronic devices left in car will help
identify trio who ran from crash in front of St. Clair Boulevard house.
NEWS 05:00 AM by Nicole O'Reilly The Hamilton Spectator




Hamilton police are hoping that evidence left behind in a car involved in a crash in front of mobster Pat Musitano's house earlier this week will hold clues to the identities of those involved.

The bizarre head-on crash around 4:30 p.m. July 22 happened when a 76-year-old "close friend" of the Mafia family, who was backing into Pat's 206 St. Clair Blvd. driveway in a Buick, accelerated rapidly toward a Mercedes on the street.

Three men, including two in the Mercedes and another who may have been outside the car, ran away. They have not been identified.

Det. Sgt. Peter Thom of the major crime unit said the airbags deployed inside the Mercedes during the crash. Police are hoping they can be tested to see if there is any blood, sweat or saliva, for DNA. Thom said police found electronic devices left behind in the Mercedes that may also help in their investigation.

Police have shared surveillance images of the men with police intelligence units at other agencies, including in Montreal — where the car was registered.

All three were described as being black and between 25 and 30 years old. One wore a mask and another carried a backpack. Two were around six feet tall with athletic builds; the third was shorter and stockier.

It remains unclear exactly what happened in the moments before the crash, including conflicting information about the whereabouts of the third man. But something "spooked" the 76-year-old, causing him to drive quickly at the Mercedes.

The investigation is made more difficult because of little co-operation with police. This includes the 25-year-old registered owner of the Mercedes who was arrested on suspicion of failing to remain at a crash and conspiracy to commit murder against the 76-year-old. However, without sufficient evidence, police released him unconditionally.

The Hamilton police investigation is focused not just on what happened in the crash, but also what the men in the Mercedes were doing on the street for "some time" before. Pasquale (Pat) Musitano, the reputed head of Hamilton's Musitano crime family, survived an attempt on his life in April when he was shot outside his lawyer's office in Mississauga. Despite being shot multiple times, he was released from hospital nearly two weeks later.

Little is known about what he has been doing since being released, including whether anyone still lives at his St. Clair home.

It appeared no one was home at the time of the crash this week, but the 76-year-old was known to be a frequent visitor — perhaps keeping an eye on the property for his friend.

Pat Musitano visited the 76-year-old, who suffered minor injuries in the crash, in hospital.

The incident comes at a time of heightened Mafia violence in the Hamilton area, including the murder of Pat's younger brother Angelo Musitano in May 2017 and the St. Clair home being sprayed with bullets on the night of June 27, 2017.

Members of rival families have seen loved ones k*lled, including the shooting deaths of Albert Iavarone and Cece Luppino.

In Angelo Musitano's murder the k*ller is accused of using sophisticated surveillance to track the family. Thom said police are examining the cars involved in the crashes to see if any trackers were installed.


 4 weeks ago '16        #714
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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somebody posted these on a mob site I lurk on and I had to post them............




teenage Joey.............





recently deceased Outfit boss Jonh "No Nose" Difronzo before he got his nose surgical repaired..........





Chucky Merlino, Phil Testa, Chickie Narducci and some guy............literally a million things you could say about this picture..............

 3 weeks ago '16        #715
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I can't tell if Frank Sheeran is full of sh*t or not...............

it would make sense for him to have been with Hoffa at the diner where he disappeared but he wasn't, we know that he was picked up in Joey Jack's car, we know that his Uncle Bily Jack was the only Detroit mob heavyweight who was never accounted for on the day of the disappearance, it was Chuckie O'Brien's fingerprints they found in the car(Hoffa's surrogate son).........theres also strong belief that Frankie The bomb and and Tony Pro were possibly there.......my point being that O'Brien was probably there to make Hoffa feel comfortable and then you had a t least one, possibly three dudes that came up as hitmen there.......why would they need or want Sheeran?


I have my doubts that he k*lled Gallo too. I know the guy that said it was Joe Yac that dispatched a hit team recanted and there were a lot of holes in his stories but that's one fu*k of a coincidence that Joey ran into Buffalino and Sheeran and disrespected Buffalino the same night he gets murdered in a Colombo hangout............

 3 weeks ago '16        #716
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The Lies of the Irishman
Netflix and Martin Scorsese are making their biggest bets ever on the confessions of a mafia “hitman.” The guy made it all up.

By BILL TONELLI
AUG 07, 201

AAssuming you were alive in April 1972 and old enough to cross the street by yourself, you could take credit for the spectacular murder of mobster Crazy Joe Gallo—gunned down during his own birthday party at Umberto’s Clam House in Little Italy—and nobody could prove you didn’t do it.

Of course, anyone who knows anything about New York City organized crime can tell you who was behind it: The murder was payback for an equally brazen shooting—in broad daylight, in midtown Manhattan—of mob boss Joseph A. Colombo Sr. a year earlier, an attack Gallo supposedly ordered (though even that no one can say with absolute certainty, since the shooter was shot dead on the spot). But no one has ever been arrested or charged in Crazy Joe’s k*lling, and so technically it’s still unsolved.

The same is true about the disappearance, in July 1975, of Teamsters’ union legend Jimmy Hoffa. He had made some lethal enemies in the mob. After serving a prison term, he persisted in trying to regain control of the union even after he was warned, over and over, to back off. The last time anybody saw him, he was standing outside a restaurant in the suburbs of Detroit, waiting to be driven to what he believed would be a peace meeting. The FBI and investigative reporters have devoted decades of effort to solving the mystery, but all we have is guesswork and theories. So if you want to step up now and say you whacked him, be my guest. That’s the thing about these gangland slayings: When done properly, you’re not supposed to know who did them. They’re planned and carried out to surprise the victim and confound the authorities. Eyewitnesses, if there are any, prove reluctant to speak up. And nobody ever confesses, unless it’s to win easy treatment from law enforcement in exchange for ratting on other, more important mobsters. Those cases often turn into the ultimate public confessional—the as-told-to, every-gory-detail, my-life-in-crime book deal. Followed by—if you’re a really lucky lowlife—the movie version that fixes your place forever in the gangster hall of fame. And then there’s the strange case of Frank Sheeran.

I Heard You Paint Houses
Steerforth

Only if you had been paying close attention to the exploits of the South Philadelphia mafia back in its glory days (the second half of the 20th century) might you have noticed Sheeran’s existence. Even there he was a second-stringer—a local Teamsters union official, meaning he was completely crooked, who hung around with mobsters, especially Russell Bufalino, a boss from backwater Scranton, Pennsylvania. Sheeran was Irish, which limited any Cosa Nostra career ambitions he might have had, and so he seemed to be just a 6-foot-4, 250-pound gorilla with a dream. He died in obscurity, in a nursing home, in 2003.

Then, six months later, a small publishing house in Hanover, New Hampshire unleashed a shocker titled I Heard You Paint Houses. It was written by Charles Brandt, a medical malpractice lawyer who had helped Sheeran win early parole from prison, due to poor health, at age 71. Starting not long after that, Brandt wrote, Sheeran, nearing the end of his life, began confessing incredible secrets he had kept for decades, revealing that—far from being a bit player—he was actually the unseen figure behind some of the biggest mafia murders of all time. Frank Sheeran said he k*lled Jimmy Hoffa.

He said he k*lled Joey Gallo, too.

And he said he did some other really bad things nearly as incredible.

Most amazingly, Sheeran did all that without ever being arrested, charged, or even suspected of those crimes by any law enforcement agency, even though officials were presumably watching him for most of his adult life. To call him the Forrest Gump of organized crime scarcely does him justice. In all the history of the mafia in America or anywhere else, really, nobody even comes close.

Now, though, Frank Sheeran is finally going to get his due.


When it premieres at the New York Film Festival in September before a fall release, The Irishman (as the tale has been retitled) will immediately enter mob movie Valhalla: Martin Scorsese directing, Robert De Niro as Sheeran, Al Pacino as Hoffa, and Joe Pesci as Bufalino, all together for the first (and probably last) time. Sheeran is a part that De Niro has reportedly wanted to play since Brandt’s book came to his attention over a decade ago. The actor has been nursing it along ever since, finally getting Netflix to put up a reported $160 million. This will be Scorsese’s most expensive film ever, in part because of the extensive digital manipulation required to allow De Niro, who turns 76 this month, to play Sheeran from his prime hoodlum years until his death at age 83.

All in all, an astounding saga. Almost too good to be true.

No, let’s say it: too good to be true.

“I’m telling you, he’s full of sh*t!” This is a retired contemporary of Sheeran’s, a fellow Irishman from Philadelphia named John Carlyle Berkery, who allegedly headed the city’s Irish mob for 20 years and had many close mafia connections. Berkery is a local legend, one of the few figures of that era still alive, not incarcerated, and in full possession of his wits. “Frank Sheeran never k*lled a fly,” he says. “The only things he ever k*lled were countless jugs of red wine. You could tell how drunk he was by the color of his teeth: pink, just started; dark purple, stiff.” “It’s baloney, beyond belief,” agrees John Tamm, a former FBI agent on the Philadelphia field office’s labor squad who investigated Sheeran and once arrested him. “Frank Sheeran was a full-time criminal, but I don’t know of anybody he personally ever k*lled, no.”

Not a single person I spoke with who knew Sheeran from Philly—and I interviewed cops and criminals and prosecutors and reporters—could remember even a suspicion that he had ever k*lled anyone. Certainly, his first noteworthy mischief held no promise of underworld greatness. In 1964, at the somewhat advanced age of 43, Sheeran was charged with beating a non-union truck driver with a lug wrench—about what you’d expect from a Teamster goon. Sheeran was later twice indicted in the murders of union rivals. But in neither case did the government or anyone else accuse him of touching a trigger, only of hiring the hit men who did his dirty work for him. When Sheeran was finally convicted of something, it was for cheating his own union members. Not exactly the kind of crime that gets you invited to Don Corleone’s daughter’s wedding.

But none of Sheeran’s nonlethal past mattered or even came up once the book came out. Though Publishers Weekly called it “long on sensational claims and short on credibility,” the credulous world welcomed a solution to the mystery of Jimmy Hoffa’s whereabouts and a chance to read tales of other famous mobster mayhem. Even the New York Times’ reviewer wrote, “It promises to clear up the mystery of Hoffa’s demise, and appears to do so.” The book appeared on the Times’ extended bestseller list and has sold over 185,000 copies, according to its publisher. Charles Brandt, the former chief deputy attorney general of the state of Delaware, was, at 62, the author of a hot property. Let’s start by looking at Sheeran’s most explosive claim, of having shot his friend Jimmy Hoffa.

Here’s the version of that mystery that has, over the years, gained the most traction: Not only was Hoffa—against the mob’s wishes—intent on regaining control of the Teamsters upon his release from prison (for jury tampering), but he was also feuding with mafioso Anthony “Tony Pro” Provenzano, head of the Teamsters local based in Union City, New Jersey. With the a*sistance of the Detroit mob, Provenzano hatched a plot where a fake meeting would be arranged and a car driven by a Hoffa ally would deliver the victim to his k*ller, Provenzano’s top enforcer, Salvatore “Sally Bugs” Briguglio. Because Sheeran and Hoffa were close friends as well as union brothers, Sheeran was recruited to ride along in the car to calm any worries Hoffa might have had about getting in.

And here’s Frank Sheeran’s version: In consultation with his fellow mob bosses, Sheeran’s patron Russell Bufalino set up the k*lling for when he and Sheeran would be in Detroit to attend a wedding. Sheeran rode with the driver when they picked Hoffa up outside the Machus Red Fox restaurant and traveled to an empty house, where the bogus peace meeting was to take place. There, Hoffa jumped out of the car and walked toward the front door with Sheeran on his heels. They entered the vestibule, Hoffa saw there was no one inside, and realized he had walked into a trap. Sheeran, standing right behind him, pulled out his gun. “If he saw the piece in my hand he had to think I had it out to protect him,” Sheeran said in the book. “He took a quick step to go around me and get to the door. He reached for the knob and Jimmy Hoffa got shot twice at a decent range—not too close or the paint splatters back at you—in the back of the head behind his right ear.”

At which point Sheeran exits the scene and a cleanup crew takes over.

Now then: Who buys Frank Sheeran’s story?

Does the FBI buy it?

According to Brandt, Robert Garrity, the FBI agent who led the investigation into Hoffa’s disappearance, once told him, “We always liked Sheeran for it.” But when I emailed Garrity to verify that, he wrote back: “I have no interest in talking about that book for a number of reasons which are personal. Good luck with your article.”

Jimmy Hoffa and Al Pacino as Jimmy Hoffa.
Jimmy Hoffa in 1974; Al Pacino as Jimmy Hoffa.
Photo illustration by Lisa Larson-Walker. Photos by Ron Galella/Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images, Netflix.

We can, however, read Garrity’s original conclusions in something called “the Hoffex memo,” a 57-page summary of the investigation drafted in January 1976. The document lists a dozen men who were suspected of having some involvement in either k*lling Hoffa or disposing of his remains. Here’s what the memo said about Sheeran: “Known to be in Detroit area at the time of [Hoffa’s] disappearance, and considered to be a close friend” of Hoffa’s.

Which suggests that Sheeran might have been part of the plot to k*ll Hoffa. But it was Briguglio, according to the memo, who was “involved in actual disappearance” of Jimmy Hoffa.

Does Steven Brill buy Sheeran’s story?

 3 weeks ago '16        #717
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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Brill is the author of The Teamsters, a history of the union and Hoffa’s disappearance, published in 1978. “When the book came out,” Brill says, “I had vaguely mentioned Sheeran as someone who might have been partially involved in Hoffa’s abduction. As a bit player.”

But Brandt’s book says Brill was reported to have interviewed Sheeran and had him—on tape—confessing to the murder.

“Total bullsh*t,” Brill says. “I would love to have had that. But I never talked to him.”

Does Ronald Cole buy Sheeran’s story?

Cole was a lawyer with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Organized Crime and Racketeering Strike Force in Philadelphia, which brought union boss Sheeran into his sights. He’s the prosecutor who finally put Sheeran behind bars for making sweetheart deals with businesses that employed Teamsters.

“I remember when the book came out,” Cole says, “I asked the FBI agents if they gave any credence to it, and they all told me, ‘No!’ ”

Does Selwyn Raab buy Sheeran’s story?

Raab is a veteran journalist, a reporter at the New York Times for 26 years, and the author of Mob Lawyer about Frank Ragano, who represented, among other gangster legends, Jimmy Hoffa.

“I know Sheeran didn’t k*ll Hoffa,” Raab says. “I’m as confident about that as you can be. There are 14 people who claim to have k*lled Hoffa. There’s an inexhaustible supply of them.”

Does Dan Moldea buy Sheeran’s story?

“I play second banana to no one” on this story, he says, and it’s easy to see why—he’s the author of nine books of investigative journalism, but is still best known for 1978’s The Hoffa Wars, which he began researching before its subject vanished. Between working on that book and on his website, he has spent more than 40 years on the Teamster trail, chasing down every shred of evidence and rumor about Hoffa’s disappearance and disposal.

Sheeran “was definitely involved,” Moldea says, “but he confessed to a murder he didn’t commit. Truthfully, I’m upset because I spent my entire career investigating this case, interviewed over 1,000 people, and I have a legitimate claim to having made an important contribution. And then a guy who wrote a one-source book based on the word of a convicted felon and proven liar gets everything? The best-selling book, the movie star treatment that comes to very few but is what every author wants? Yes, I’m bitter about this.”

Even Sheeran, before he said that he k*lled Hoffa, said that he didn’t. In 1995, he announced to Kitty Caparella, who covered organized crime for the Philadelphia Daily News, that he was negotiating a multimillion-dollar deal for a book he would write with a collaborator he met in prison. “I did not k*ll Hoffa and I had nothing to do with it,” Sheeran told her, and then he named the real mastermind behind the disappearance: President Richard Nixon.

Before we go any further, a brief but possibly relevant digression about the “paint splatters” Sheeran mentioned in his account of Hoffa’s k*lling. According to Sheeran, the first time he and Hoffa ever talked was on the phone, in a conversation that Hoffa started by saying, “I heard you paint houses.” Also according to Sheeran, those words were mob code meaning: I heard you k*ll people, the “paint” being the blood that splashes when you fire bullets into a body.

To which Sheeran replied, “Yeah, and I do my own carpentry work, too.” Meaning: I also dispose of the dead bodies.

“There are 14 people who claim to have k*lled Hoffa. There’s an inexhaustible supply of them.”
— Selwyn Raab, longtime New York Times reporter
Here’s my nagging question: In all of mob literature, fictional and factual, has anyone ever uttered such expressions about painting and carpentry? I couldn’t find any. Nobody I interviewed—and they number in the dozens, good guys, bad guys, neutral observers—had ever heard it either. Go Google it yourself and email me if you find it anywhere except in Frank Sheeran’s mouth. Even Charles Brandt admits he had never heard of it, but added that mobsters in Bufalino’s isolated corner of northeastern Pennsylvania “have their own lingo.”

I don’t want to slow things down any further by pointing out that Sheeran was from Philly and Hoffa from Detroit.

Anyway, it’s a vivid and memorable title. It was chosen by Frank Weimann, the literary agent who sold the book.

Brandt says that when Hoffa made that fateful phone call, he was looking for someone who would k*ll union rivals and other foes for him. Sheeran claimed he took the job. Brandt told me, “Frank confessed to 25 to 30 murders, he couldn’t remember how many. One day he did a tour for Hoffa—he flew to Chicago and then to Puerto Rico and did a total of three hits.”

And there we have just one more astounding piece of Sheeran’s tale: so many murders he lost count! Except there’s no evidence that even one such k*lling ever took place. No one (aside from Frank Sheeran) has ever alleged that Hoffa commissioned even a single murder. When you ask Brandt for proof, he can only point to times that Hoffa—who was a famous hothead and raging blowhard—said he wanted to k*ll a long list of people, including John Kennedy, Bobby Kennedy, and others who crossed him. No known murders, though.

And back to the action.

Here is the version of Joey Gallo’s k*lling as it has come to be accepted over the years: He was out on the town with friends, family, his new wife, and her daughter to celebrate his 43rd birthday. First, the party visited the Copacabana nightclub, and then, in the wee hours, decided to eat. They couldn’t find an open restaurant in Chinatown so they wandered into Little Italy to a new joint, Umberto’s Clam House, not knowing it was owned by a mobster named Matty the Horse.

Umberto's Clam House.
Umberto’s Clam House after Gallo’s murder, 1972; a still from The Irishman’s trailer, showing the moment before the crime.
Photo illustration by Lisa Larson-Walker. Photos by Jim Heimann Collection/Getty Images, Netflix.
As they entered, a hood who was connected to the Colombo family saw them and immediately split, found some colleagues, and told them he had spotted Gallo. They called their boss, who told them to arm themselves, drive over to Umberto’s, and k*ll him. They followed orders, burst into the restaurant, and one of them—a convicted murderer named Carmine “Sonny Pinto” Di Biase—began blasting. Gallo was hit three times. k*llers and victim then made their way outside, where the murder crew piled into cars and took off and left Gallo in the street, dying.

And here’s Sheeran’s version: Gallo’s murder happened not due to his war with the Colombo family but because, earlier in the evening at the Copa, Crazy Joe was rude to Sheeran’s boss Russell Bufalino, who gave Frank the nod. Sheeran says he was informed by spies not only which restaurant Gallo would choose hours later, but exactly where he would be sitting. Sheeran arrived at the appointed time and entered alone, trying to seem like a working truck driver needing a break.

Then, once inside:

A split second after I turned to face the table, Crazy Joey Gallo’s driver got shot from behind. … Crazy Joey swung around out of his chair and headed down toward the corner door to the shooter’s right. … It was easy to cut him off by going straight down the bar to the door and getting right behind him. He made it through Umberto’s corner door to the outside. Crazy Joey got shot about three times outside of the restaurant not far from the corner door.

OK, who buys Sheeran’s story?

Did the police buy it?

Hard to say, since the detectives in charge of the case are dead. But newspaper coverage of the k*lling all carried a description of the gunman offered by police and witnesses—according to the New York Daily News he was “about 5-foot-8, stocky, about 40 years old and with receding dark hair.” In other words, not Sheeran but Di Biase.

Does Frank Storey buy Sheeran’s story?

Storey was the FBI a*sistant special agent in charge of the organized crime program at the New York City field office. “That’s just crazy,” he says. “He didn’t do it. He never would have gone to New York to do that. It just wouldn’t have happened.”

Does Sina Essary buy Sheeran’s story?

Essary was sitting at the table at Umberto’s with her new husband Joey Gallo, her 10-year-old daughter, and the others in their party when the bullets began to fly. “They were little, short, fat Italians,” she says of the hit squad, hardly describing a 6-foot-4 Irishman.

Does Nicholas Gage buy Sheeran’s story?

Gage was the New York Times reporter who broke the inside story of Gallo’s k*lling, including who did it, how, and why. He had been covering the mob for the Times and the Wall Street Journal for years and wrote The Mafia is Not an Equal Opportunity Employer, a 1971 book that focused partly on Gallo. (They met not long before the murder.) Gage interviewed Joseph Luparelli, the wiseguy who spied Gallo at Umberto’s and set in motion the events that led to the k*lling. Then, in 1975, Gage spent three days interviewing Gallo’s bodyguard, Pete “the Greek” Diapoulas, who was shot once, and who told the same story—including identifying Di Biase, whom he knew, as the shooter.

“I haven’t read the script of The Irishman,” Gage says, “but the book on which it is based is the most fabricated mafia tale since the fake autobiography of Lucky Luciano 40 years ago.”

Before we go any further, another quick digression about something you may have noticed earlier—the weird way that Sheeran phrased his confessions to both murders. Specifically, his use of the passive voice. “Jimmy Hoffa got shot twice at a decent range.” “Crazy Joey got shot about three times outside of the restaurant.”

I wondered about that, too.

Near the end of the book, Brandt tries to get Sheeran to confirm, one final time, all that he confessed before.

“Frank confessed to 25 to 30 murders, he couldn’t remember how many.”
— Charles Brandt
“Now,” Brandt said to Sheeran, “you read the book. The things that are in there about Jimmy and what happened to him are things that you told me, isn’t that right?”

Frank Sheeran said, “That’s right.”

“And you stand behind them?”

And he said, “I stand behind what’s written.”

Which means that even in his deathbed confession, Frank Sheeran never actually says the words, “I k*lled Jimmy Hoffa,” or that he k*lled Joey Gallo, or anybody at all.

When I bring this up to Brandt, he scoffs. Had Sheeran made the grammatical misstep of saying plainly “I k*lled them,” Brandt believes, he would have been making an airtight confession to two murders and exposed himself to guaranteed life in prison.

“If anything,” Brandt says, “it adds to Frank Sheeran’s credibility.”

 3 weeks ago '16        #718
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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Sheeran’s claims about k*lling Gallo and Hoffa aren’t even his most amazing yarns. He also said that just before the Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, in 1962, he was ordered by his mob bosses to drive a truckload of uniforms and weapons to a dog track in Florida, where he delivered the cargo to CIA agent E. Howard Hunt, who , a decade later, would be one of the Watergate burglars. And then, in November 1963, Sheeran said he was summoned to an Italian restaurant in Brooklyn, where a gangster handed him a duffel bag containing three rifles and told him to deliver them to a pilot, who took the bag and disappeared—and then, next thing you know, Lee Harvey Oswald a*sassinated the president. Also, Sheeran tells about taking a suitcase containing half a million dollars in cash to the lobby of the Washington, D.C. Hilton, where he was joined by then–U.S. Attorney General John Mitchell, who sat a while to shoot the breeze and then walked off with the money, a bribe for his boss, President Richard Nixon.

I could keep going like this, but you get the picture. It’s time, at last, to ask: Does anybody buy Frank Sheeran’s story?

I found four such individuals.

Chip Fleischer buys it.

Fleischer was the editor at Steerforth Press who bought the book and guided it to publication. “When I read it,” he says, “my reaction was this potentially was the biggest thing we ever published—in terms of sales, but also in terms of historical importance.”

Fleischer knew they would be contradicting widely accepted versions of famous crimes. “I couldn’t help but worry we were going to come out looking silly somehow,” he says, “but just the opposite happened.” Fleischer is now the publisher of Steerforth Press.

Frank Weimann buys it.

Weimann, a veteran New York literary agent who has also represented other successful mob-related books, including memoirs by Joe Bonanno and his son Bill, steered Brandt’s book through two publishing deals that fell apart before the successful third try at Steerforth. One of those attempts was scuttled, Weimann told me, when it was discovered that Sheeran had forged a letter he said Hoffa had written to him.

Brandt writes in the book that despite the forgery, he still believed in Sheeran. What about Weimann? Did the literary agent have any doubts about the truthfulness of the book?

“No,” he says, “I never did.”

Eric Shawn buys it.

Shawn is a Fox News reporter who went to Detroit and found the house where Sheeran said Hoffa was k*lled, then had the floorboards in the doorway tested for human blood. And found some, he revealed—but none of the DNA matched Hoffa’s (which Shawn says could be attributed to the years that passed between the k*lling and the testing). In the course of his reporting, Shawn says he interviewed people in Sheeran’s hometown and in Hoffa’s, not one of whom ever suspected a thing. “In Philadelphia they think he was just a drunk. In Detroit they never heard of him,” Shawn says. “So, he’s the perfect guy” to carry out the murders. “He slipped through the cracks.” When a Slate fact-checker followed up with Shawn, he replied that he’s still investigating and added, “My hour and a half documentary, Riddle: The Search for James R. Hoffa is available now on the new streaming service Fox Nation.”

And Charles Brandt buys it.

This was not Brandt’s first experience with hardened criminals or with publishing. In the Delaware attorney general’s office, he says, he specialized in homicide prosecutions and was an expert in the art of questioning bad people to learn the truth. Before working with Sheeran, he had written a novel based on murders he had solved.

At first, Brandt says, Sheeran told him he wanted to do a book proving he was innocent in Hoffa’s disappearance: “But I could tell, this guy has something he wants to get off his chest. Interrogation is a journey.” Sheeran started by admitting that he was there on the scene when Hoffa was k*lled, Brandt says, but it wasn’t until more than eight years later—when Sheeran realized that he was nearing death—that he finally confessed to shooting his friend and Teamster brother.

Brandt questioned Sheeran over the course of five years, he says, and used every trick he learned as a prosecutor to try and catch Sheeran in a lie. “I knew that everything I ultimately accepted from him was the truth,” Brandt says. Any skepticism about the book “is nonsense.”

After the initial publication of I Heard You Paint Houses, Brandt says, he began receiving independent verifications of Sheeran’s claims from people in a position to know. “It was like stuff was coming out of nowhere to corroborate Frank’s confession,” he says. These accounts appear in the updated edition of the book.

According to Brandt, New York City Detective Joe Coffey, who investigated Gallo’s shooting back in ’72, told him that he “believed it had been solved by Frank’s confession.” But in The Coffey Files, the detective’s own 1992 memoir, he says he learned from informants that Sonny Pinto was the shooter—just as everyone has held all along. We can’t reconcile these; Coffey died in 2015.

The best of Brandt’s verifications came when he discovered an eyewitness to Gallo’s shooting. In the book, she’s anonymous at her request. In 1972 she was a college student visiting New York, Brandt writes, and happened to be at Umberto’s in the wee hours of the night in question. When I spoke with her on the phone, she asked to be identified as someone who has worked as a journalist for New York City newspapers.

When she heard shots, she says, she looked up at where they came from and saw a tall man, “not particularly Irish-looking,” she remembers. “He was ruddy. He was definitely not a short Italian.”

Did she see a gun in his hand? “No—I don’t think so,” she says.

In his book, Brandt says that in 2004, he showed her several photos of Sheeran, at different ages. He writes:

Then she looked again at the photo of Sheeran taken around the time of the Gallo hit, and she said with palpable fear, “This picture gives me chills.”

When I spoke with her, here’s what she said: “As far as corroborating that it was Frank Sheeran, when I was shown three photos, the person I identified looked more like him than anybody else. And this was many, many years afterward.”

Thirty-two years, to be exact. Does she believe he was Gallo’s k*ller?

“Do I think it was Frank Sheeran? Yeah.”

And that’s it for the real-life version of events. Now we can turn to the movies, where the standard of proof is more relaxed. Martin Scorsese grew up in Little Italy. He has already directed two classic movies about the mob—Goodfellas and Casino—based solidly on nonfiction books by a respected journalist, Nicholas Pileggi. So, we know he is somewhat wise in these matters. Yet he’s made a movie based on a book whose central claims are denied by a whole lot of people in a position to know.

It’s possible The Irishman will treat Sheeran’s stories as tall tales. Scorsese, of course, has played with subverting criminals’ self-aggrandizement before; think of Jordan Belfort’s unreliable narration in The Wolf of Wall Street, a movie that makes it clear, by the end, that its protagonist views us, the audience, as just another mark. Is that what Scorsese’s up to with The Irishman? Did Netflix invest nearly $200 million in a scathing satire of gangster braggadocio? Or does he buy

Frank Sheeran’s story?

I don’t know. Scorsese declined to talk to me.

I do know about a discussion in 2014 between Robert De Niro and Hoffa expert Dan Moldea, after a writers’ banquet the author hosts annually in Washington. There, Moldea spent 20 minutes lecturing De Niro that his movie would be based on a lie while the actor quietly listened. “De Niro was very polite, and Dan was very forceful,” said Gus Russo, Moldea’s friend and a fellow investigative reporter.

Moldea doesn’t disagree—“I told him, ‘Bob, you’re getting conned.’ ”

“Hollywood gets the last word,” Russo says.

Does De Niro buy Sheeran’s story? I don’t know. He also declined to talk to me.

We’re closing in on the end of this saga, and still have yet to wonder: Why might Frank Sheeran have confessed to such horrible acts if he hadn’t done them? According to Brandt, Sheeran, nearing death, returned to his Catholic faith and wished to clear his conscience, even though it meant admitting that he had k*lled his best friend. It takes some of the shine off that halo when you remember that he could have spilled his guts while he was still healthy enough for life in prison. Sheeran can’t enjoy any of the financial reward for his confession but his heirs, three of his daughters, can: They and Brandt split all proceeds from the book, including the film rights. Even if that motive for writing the book seems cynical, we’d know that at least once in his life, Sheeran had a selfless impulse.

And so, to sum things up, here’s what “I Heard You Paint Houses” asks us to believe, the story that The Irishman appears ready to tell the world: that starting at age 52, having no known murders on his résumé, Frank Sheeran, a Teamster thug and well-known drunk, was selected to carry out two of the most audacious hits in the history of organized crime, plus a long list of other heinous acts.

On the other hand, here’s what we know for sure: Nobody ever accused Frank Sheeran of k*lling Jimmy Hoffa—except Frank Sheeran.

Nobody ever accused Frank Sheeran of k*lling Joey Gallo—except Frank Sheeran.

Nobody ever accused Frank Sheeran of k*lling 25 to 30 other people, so many he couldn’t remember them all. Except Frank Sheeran.

Now, maybe that means he really was the smartest, sneakiest, stealthiest hit man of all time.

That’s a possibility.

But then you remember that, by and large, mob guys have never been what you’d call geniuses of crime. Oh, they break a lot of laws. They’re superb at that. Still, history has shown that they are not the type to repeatedly break the law unobserved, undetected, unarrested. Eventually they all get caught, most on multiple occasions. They wind up either behind bars, dead, or living under new, government-issued identities.

I spoke of this once with the late journalist Jimmy Breslin, who was among our greatest chroniclers of mob life (and whose comic novel, The Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight, was inspired by Gallo and his crew).

I asked Breslin: Aren’t gangsters as smart and cunning as they’re depicted in movies and books?

“IQs of 55,” he said. “They all went to jail. What does that tell you? To be charitable, it was an overrated business.”

Anyway, it should be a great movie.


 2 weeks ago '16        #719
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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This Philly hustler, once called a ‘drug kingpin’ and spent 30 years in prison, now owns a CBD cafe
by Sam Wood, Updated: February 16, 2019




George Martorano was supposed to die in federal prison.
Sentenced to life without parole in 1984, Martorano spent more than three decades in a series of “supermax” facilities after pleading guilty to running what prosecutors said was a $75 million-a-year narcotics ring. “I was told the only way I’d get out was in a body bag," said Martarano. "I proved them wrong.”
Martorano — who once trafficked tons of marijuana and other illegal substances -- has been reborn as a legal cannabis entrepreneur. The only thing he runs now is a cozy coffee shop, the Hip Hemp Cafe in South Philadelphia, where he serves CBD-infused hot drinks, lollipops, and muffins.
Once described by the FBI as a drug kingpin, Martorano has an empire that is small, but he plans to grow it into a chain of 12 shops down the East Coast from Staten Island to Fort Lauderdale. He currently employs five millennials -- none with an Italian last name, he quipped -- within the 600-square-foot retail space just off South Street. The building, on the 600 block of South Seventh Street, is owned by his sister and brother-in-law, records show. “I’ve turned my nightmare into something more profound,” said Martorano, 69. “Now look at me. And look at what I’ve done.”
Martorano -- who has been called the longest serving nonviolent offender in U.S. history -- spent 32 years in prison. He was released from prison in 2015 for good behavior. He says he’s not going to blow his second chance. When he was set free, there were only two places in South Philly he said hadn’t changed in the years since he was locked up: His mother’s house on Fitzwater Street, where he lives and takes care of her, and his favorite restaurant, the Saloon, where he’s a regular.
Martorano looks nothing like the Philly street hustler he once was. He exudes warm confidence and a sense of refined style more akin to a tanned and fit Hollywood character actor. He doesn’t deny his past.
“I’m not saying I was innocent,” said Martorano, the son of the late mobster Raymond “Long John” Martorano. “For three years, I was a weed dealer. But I was never a part of Cosa Nostra. It was my father who was in with those guys. Not me. I was never a ‘made’ man.”
Martorano is one of several business operators seeking to resurrect themselves in Pennsylvania’s emerging legal cannabis marketplace. Once-disgraced Tour de France champion Floyd Landis, who remade himself as a marijuana entrepreneur in Colorado, announced last week that he would open the first of several cycling-themed CBD cafes in Lancaster. As a convicted felon, Martorano is prohibited from selling medical marijuana in Pennsylvania. But that doesn’t prevent him from vending dozens of products infused with a legal cannabis derivative called CBD, or cannabidiol.
“Everything in my store has CBD in it,” he said.
CBD is a non-intoxicating compound extracted from industrial hemp, the look-alike cousin of psychoactive marijuana. Some believe CBD has numerous health benefits. It has been touted as a near-magical supplement and used to reduce anxiety and treat inflammation. Though the FDA recently approved a prescription version to treat some rare forms of childhood epilepsy, there is no scientific evidence CBD is effective for any other conditions.
“I use it myself. I believe in it,” said Martorano, who prefers to smoke hemp flower high in CBD. “I take it for relaxation. I do so many things now I need to relax.”
A glass display case highlights pre-rolled joints packed with industrial hemp, CBD vape cartridges, CBD creams, and CBD-infused hot sauce. A tall plexiglass canister was filled with smokable hemp flowers that could be easily confused with psychoactive THC-rich marijuana buds.
The Hip Hemp Cafe’s manager, Chris Mendenhall, said that if Pennsylvania ever legalizes marijuana for adult recreational use, the store will be well-poised to serve that market. “I’d have to bail out if that happened,” said Martorano. “But my job is to market this place.” Since the shop opened Jan. 23, the Hip Hemp Cafe has grossed $1,000 to $2,000 a day, Martarano said.
One of the two smartphones he carries chirped as he recounted his life behind bars. Martorano winced as he pulled the device out of his sport coat pocket and muted the ringer.
“I hadn’t held a cell phone until Oct. 5, 2015, when I was released to my sister in St. Pete,” he said. “Now I’m sentenced to this friggin’ thing. I don’t know what’s worse, life without parole or this ... cell phone.”
By all accounts, Martorano was a stellar inmate with a gift for storytelling. “I know while he was in prison he made the best of his time. He wrote books. He taught classes,” said Jim Sweeney, the retired FBI agent who led the investigation that found Martorano guilty of dealing tons of marijuana and tens of thousands of Quaaludes. The agent also videotaped Martorano conspiring in a hotel room to distribute mass quantities of heroin with the Black Mafia in North Philadelphia.
Martorano insists he was only “a weed guy.” He claims the sentencing judge gave the unprecedented term to force him to flip on his father and other mob bosses. He said the feds arrested him at a North Miami hotel and charged him with shipping a literal truckload of cannabis to Philadelphia. “It was only 2,600 pounds of weed, and I wasn’t even there,” he protested.
Louis R. Pichini, the former federal prosecutor who locked him up, said Martorano was “trying to reconstruct history."
“It was much more than marijuana,” said Pichini, now legal counsel at Deloitte. "And the evidence supported it. We never had a case with the evidence as strong as that one. We had hours and hours of tape.”
Over the decades, he evolved from a budding wise guy to self-styled wise man.
Driven by five-years in solitary confinement, Martorano became a prolific writer. “Every time there was a mob hit in Philadelphia, they threw me in the hole,” he said. During Martorano’s first years inside, during the mid-'80s, gangsters were gunned down routinely on city streets. With so much time on his hands, Martorano penned the first of his hard-boiled novels. He didn’t stop until he had completed 31. Among the titles: Pain Grows a Platinum Rose, Lion Love Last, and The Honey Keeper.
He no longer writes. “I can only do that in a cell,” he said.
But in prison, his love of storytelling blossomed into a full-time job. He taught creative writing to inmates. Without chalk and a blackboard, he improvised, using a blue bar of soap to write on a prison wall in a room called “the pit,” he said. He discovered a talent for lecturing and created a life-skills class.
“I basically gave birth to a revived federal reentry program, though I never took credit. You always give the credit to the warden," he said with a broad smile. “Only a fool upstages the warden.”
Outside the walls, Martorano now takes credit for personally training more than 8,000 men.
“It was a lifestyle change course," Martorano said. “Teach 'em how to be on time. How to be respectful. How to take care of themselves. I taught them how to talk. I told them to get into sales when they got out. I showed them the way up and out. Gave them hope.”
He was the coordinator of his prison’s suicide prevention program, he said, and was even elected as the first Caucasian to the board of the Coleman Federal Penitentiary’s branch of NAACP. The U.S. Bureau of Prisons said it could not comment on inmate activities.
George Anastasia, retired mob writer for the Inquirer, said Martorano was one of the few figures a*sociated with local organized crime to successfully overcome his past.
“He survived and was able to come back on the other side of this,” said Anastasia. “Georgie’s sane, lucid and productive. It goes to his character that he was able to do all that.”
Martorano’s good works paid off.
“Those were the deciding factors that led to my release,” Martorano said. “The staff also wanted me to get out. I can’t thank them enough.”
After he was set free, Martorano was celebrated as a marijuana folk hero. He embarked on a speaking tour. He recorded a well-received TEDx presentation at the University of Pennsylvania on how he became a writer. It has been viewed nearly 400,000 times.
“I kept hearing about CBD,” he said. So he took a course in running a dispensary where he could provide it to people who need it. “I had been following the news about marijuana getting legalized out west. But I heard a lot about mothers using CBD to help their children.”
He wants to help people. He wants that to be his legacy.
“It’s not about me," he said. "This is all about helping other people. If anything, I want to be known as the Kingpin of Hope. Remember that title: George Martorano, the Kingpin of Hope. That’s who I am now.”



he spent his entire time in prison helping fellow inmates and has spent a lot of his time since he's been out doing all kinds of good too.......

he must have some fu*king stories tho, being Long John's son and coming up in the 80's era Philly drug and mob scenes..........wonder if he he fu*ked with Salvie? they both fu*ked with the JBM too so its pretty possible......pretty sure their dad's were cool also............Longy was made under Phil.........


Last edited by smokeytheblunt2; 08-13-2019 at 06:07 AM..

 2 weeks ago '16        #720
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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Phil Testa's casket.............

Im not sure why my father is carrying the top of the casket( dude really does look just like my dad when he was younger, definitely isn't but its still fu*king hilarious).............
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 2 weeks ago '10        #721
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said



Phil Testa's casket.............

Im not sure why my father is carrying the top of the casket( dude really does look just like my dad when he was younger, definitely isn't but its still fu*king hilarious).............
lmaooo that's gotta be a real close relative cause he looks like an older version of sal testa. any clue who the other pallbearers are ?
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 2 weeks ago '10        #722
t from the 617 
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also which sites do you check out? i usually check gangsterbb and the blackhand. gangsterbb has fallen off lately though.
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 2 weeks ago '16        #723
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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 t from the 617 said
lmaooo that's gotta be a real close relative cause he looks like an older version of sal testa. any clue who the other pallbearers are ?
I had to get my brother to look at the pic and it had him dying too.........

I have no idea who any of them are........

 2 weeks ago '16        #724
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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 t from the 617 said
also which sites do you check out? i usually check gangsterbb and the blackhand. gangsterbb has fallen off lately though.
gangsterbb is the only other forum i go to but I don't post there. I go to gangertereport daily, and a few other article driven sites like that.........

and yeah, gangsterbb has fallen off............

theres still a few dudes that know their sh*t that post there daily still but theres a couple people that place really misses..........

 1 week ago '16        #725
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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Lucchese family captain Steven Crea Jr agrees to plea deal
August 16, 2019

Steven Crea Jr the son of Lucchese crime family leader Steven (Stevie Wonder) Crea has agreed to a plea deal. Crea Jr will plead guilty next week to three charges including racketeering conspiracy but not the murder of former Purple Gang leader Michael Meldish. He is going to be facing a maximum of 13 years behind bars according to the Gangland News report. He has been out on bail for about a year and will likely get credit for the 14 months he spent in jail before he was released. From prior ruling and statements by Judge Cathy Seibel who is also a former mafia prosecutor, it seems likely that Crea receives the full 13-year sentence. If so the 47-year-old would be out of prison in 2028 still only in his mid-50s. The younger Crea has maintained his innocence in the Meldish murder from the start. Judge Seibel let him loose on $1 Million dollars bail after one of the feds key witnesses Frank Pasqua III gave what the just called a totally wrong account of the hit. Then a lie detector given by a recognized polygraph expert cleared him of any role in the murder. In fact, Crea is so emphatic that he had nothing to do with it he passed up a 10-year plea deal that would have called for him to admit his role in the slaying. And avoiding pleading guilty to the murder may have been a ploy to help protect his father in the upcoming trial.

Crea Jr along with his dad the Cosa Nostra families underboss and former acting boss Matthew Madonna were charged with murder with not only the Meldish but with being part of a long-running racketeering conspiracy. According to prosecutors, they have amassed a stunning amount of evidence against the mobsters that includes over a dozen cooperating witness and hundreds of hours of tape-recorded conversations. They believe this evidence easily ties the defendants to years of Lucchese family crimes that they will have no trouble winning convictions in court.

The plea deal seems to a*sure the younger Crea of the light side of what could be a much harsher sentence. Even though the evidence seems slim tying him to the Meldish murder there was still a chance a jury could find him guilty of it and send him to prison for life. And even if he skated on the murder charge the odds that he would still be convicted of racketeering seems strong which would have carried with it a 20-year sentence. The upcoming New York Mafia trial will be one of the biggest of the year.






had to have done that for his dad cuz I don't see Jr having intimate details on a murder that his dad might or might not have called............

I also imagine all these guys take a plea cuz you never know wtf can come out in court............

in reality there should probably be a boss from another family on trial for the meldish murder too so..................



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