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Damn Sprite was for the culture


 


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 6 days ago '17        #51
QdobaCasanova  13 heat pts13
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 The Knuckle God said
I used to always rap the Grand Puba verse when his commercial came on. The 5 Deadly Venoms was a great ad too.

I miss those days when hip hop in general was seen as marketable. Nowadays it's only the mainstream acts that are considered "marketable". No slight to them, these old ads just show you don't have to be a superstar to make a good ad and also show respect to a culture.
Um dawg rap is the biggest genre in the world. I have no idea what youre talking about.

Migos has commercials. Literally nothing about them is marketable.

 6 days ago '17        #52
ASNKA  67 heat pts67
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 KdenIII said
u need a video from the 50s to explain basic marketing?

every commercial is aimed at specific demographics, I don't get the relevance of this.
not everybodys as woke as you. there are a lot of young people on here

i don't get why you would ask this just because YOU know about target demographics and marketing doesn't mean everybody else does
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 6 days ago '18        #53
KdenIII  26 heat pts26
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 ASNKA said
not everybodys as woke as you. there are a lot of young people on here

i don't get why you would ask this just because YOU know about target demographics and marketing doesn't mean everybody else does
I didn't realize that was the point u were making, my bad.
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 6 days ago '17        #54
ASNKA  67 heat pts67
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 KdenIII said
I didn't realize that was the point u were making, my bad.

 6 days ago '15        #55
The Knuckle God  22 heat pts22
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 QdobaCasanova said
Um dawg rap is the biggest genre in the world. I have no idea what youre talking about.

Migos has commercials. Literally nothing about them is marketable.
I'm comparing this generation of rappers in ads to the 90's. Those commericals had Mia X, Grand Puba, KRS, and a few others since hip hop was marketable as a whole rather than the talent in the ad. Migos is one of the biggest acts right now, so of course they would get those spots; same with Cardi, Lil Wayne, Chance, etc.

We're just in a different era, that's all. Before corporations could take more risks but now it's more about a promising outreach. I'm sure now they check social media stats and following before booking rappers to get an idea of how it will perform and the target audience.

 6 days ago '05        #56
blackninja  15 heat pts15
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 l3altimore 7 said


Early 2000's was a magical period


Every time I see that throwback, I can taste that tropical flavor. I loved that and don't know why they stopped making it.

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 6 days ago '16        #57
kuul  24 heat pts24
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Hamburger helper mixtape came from outta nowhere.
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 6 days ago '04        #58
D1nOnlyMrM@  54 heat pts54
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How Business Has Undermined Racism: The Pepsi Story
Profit sometimes coincides with the promotion of human dignity
Posted Feb 03, 2019

Black History Month provides an opportune time to recall that American business sometimes labored right alongside the civil rights movement in undermining racism. Case in point: the Pepsi corporation’s efforts in the 1940s and 1950s to increase sales to blacks. Though focused foremost on profits, Pepsi’s “special markets” program fostered the business careers of a diverse group of black men, drew attention to the economic importance of what was then referred to as “the Negro market,” and projected a more progressive view of black life. Opposing racism turned out to be good for business.

article continues after advertisement

Walter Mack, president of Pepsi during the 1940s, noticed that the company’s marketing strategies too often either ignored black customers or portrayed them in unflattering and stereotypical ways. Pepsi was struggling at the time and needed a strategy for increasing sales. The company had been portraying itself as a value leader, largely because its nickel bottles contained 12 ounces of soda, as compared to Coke’s 6 ounces. However, the lower per-ounce-cost led some to conclude that Pepsi was a lower-quality product, and the extra costs of production were eating into bottler’s margins.

Mack called for a team of black marketers to promote sales in black communities. The team was notable for its diversity. The first recruit, Hennan Smith, had worked in newspaper advertising. Later in the decade, other formidable recruits included Jean Emmons, who had been unable to find a suitable job despite holding an MBA from the University of Chicago, and Richard Hurt, who covered Jackie Robinson and the integration of blacks into major league baseball for a Harlem newspaper. Their charge? To enhance the relationship between black communities and the Pepsi-Cola corporation.

The team, which eventually numbered more than a dozen members, crisscrossed the USA, encountering racism at every turn. In the south, team members had no choice but to drink from “colored only” fountains, ride in the back of buses, and stay with families, because hotels refused to accommodate them. To avoid eating in segregated areas while traveling by train, they would sometimes take their meals in Pullman cars. They faced demeaning comments from fellow Pepsi employees and even threats from the Ku Klux Clan.

article continues after advertisement

The work itself was long and hard. Team members often worked seven days a week. They paid visits to bottlers, civic organizations, churches, and business and professional meetings. Their message was unmistakable. The Coca Cola corporation was perceived as reluctant to hire blacks to play such roles, and its chair had endorsed the re-election campaign of a segregationist governor of Georgia. By contrast, visits by team members made it clear that Pepsi took a different stance on race and was actively courting the black community.

Instead of pandering to popular stereotypes, Pepsi promoted a different image of blacks in its advertising. The team persuaded popular entertainers such as Duke Ellington to endorse Pepsi. They featured profiles of prominent black citizens, such as Ralph Bunche, whose diplomacy had garnered him a Nobel Prize. Its ads depicted middle-class citizens who cared about their families, their jobs, and their communities, and who knew a good value when they saw one. One prominent print ad featured future US Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown as a child, reaching up for a bottle of Pepsi.

USA Today
1940s Pepsi Ad with future Secretary of Commerce Ron BrownSource: USA Today
The effects were not immediate, but during the 1950s Pepsi’s sales increased dramatically, eventually outselling Coke in the black community by a margin of three to one. Years later, the technique would come to be known as “niche advertising,” an approach for carving out a distinct place in the market. More importantly, the biographical portraits and the like were so inspirational that teachers started using Pepsi ads in the classroom, awakening students’ imaginations to the types of lives they could lead.

Yet Pepsi’s focus on the black community was tempered by a determination not to offend its white customer base. Early in the 1950s, Mack left the company, which soon adopted a different marketing structure. The special markets team was disbanded, and many of its members were integrated into regional sales teams or left the company. One, Harvey Russell, remained with Pepsi and eventually rose to the position of vice president, becoming one of the first blacks to attain such a high position in a large American corporation.

The story of Pepsi’s special markets team is admirably told in Stephanie Capparell’s 2007 book, “The Real Pepsi Challenge.” Though motivated primarily by profit, Pepsi’s efforts to expand sales by focusing on the black community helped to show that blacks could perform at least as well as whites in a major corporation. It showed that corporations disregarded minority communities only at their own economic cost . And it showcased for all races a new and different image of the lives of blacks in American society. Sometimes good business and good social policy coincide.

References

Capparell, Stephanie. "The Real Pepsi Challenge." New York: Simon and Schuster, 2007.
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 6 days ago '04        #59
D1nOnlyMrM@  54 heat pts54
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I'm proud to say this site is an Avenue of education for those that appeal to being outside the box
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 6 days ago '04        #60
D1nOnlyMrM@  54 heat pts54
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 blackninja said
Every time I see that throwback, I can taste that tropical flavor. I loved that and don't know why they stopped making it.

I know how to make a Sprite remix c*cktail. Passion. Fruits puree strawberry puree and pineapple juice plus sprite ;)
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 6 days ago '14        #61
Christian238  5 heat pts5
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To this day ESPECIALLY in this day and age where everything is for the "likes" and the fake sh*t thrives i use the slogan "image is nothing obey your thirst"...




Funny how times have changed...





I will say i'm all for the "good f*ght" but damned if you do, damned if you don't...



They refuse to market to the black community muthafu*kas get mad and want to be included...



They market to the black community...muthafu*kas get mad and call it pandering...




All we could afford was Shasta, Welchs and the generic "Cola" sh*ts when i was growing up but these commercials made me proud as sh*t




 6 days ago '05        #62
blackninja  15 heat pts15
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 D1nOnlyMrM@ said
I know how to make a Sprite remix c*cktail. Passion. Fruits puree strawberry puree and pineapple juice plus sprite ;)
WHAT? I have organic passion fruit and strawberry concentrates. I need some of that Sprite remix. Is it still available?

 6 days ago '19        #63
Hungsolow 
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I bet those rappers didn't see a penny back then
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 5 days ago '04        #64
shadow_boxer  2 heat pts2
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 The Knuckle God said
Most def, they would follow the same formula. These times are more brand/influencer based so companies aren't willing to risk going with lesser known talent.
and thats whats sucks because you cant get nothing fresh

 5 days ago '16        #65
Bidam7  475 heat pts475
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Rest In Paradise P


Last edited by Bidam7; 09-12-2019 at 12:05 AM..

 5 days ago '04        #66
D1nOnlyMrM@  54 heat pts54
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 blackninja said
WHAT? I have organic passion fruit and strawberry concentrates. I need some of that Sprite remix. Is it still available?
I gave you the recipe to make it organically but they got the tropical mix here in dc

 5 days ago '05        #67
blackninja  15 heat pts15
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 D1nOnlyMrM@ said
I gave you the recipe to make it organically but they got the tropical mix here in dc

YO!!! I thought you were telling me to add those ingredients to the Sprite remix. I was out of line. I totally get it now. Thanks! I do have a form of those ingredients.

 5 days ago '04        #68
D1nOnlyMrM@  54 heat pts54
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 blackninja said
YO!!! I thought you were telling me to add those ingredients to the Sprite remix. I was out of line. I totally get it now. Thanks! I do have a form of those ingredients.
Its awesome... if you get some leblon cachaca (Brazilian rum) its smooth as fu*k but it hit

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