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 2 weeks ago '13        #101
dsaint 
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LMAO @ dudes trying to front like they are ashamed of them food stamps. Why no one willing to admit they was once poor as fu*k? AIYYO, I damn sure know what it is to run up with them ol stamps. They get a nice debit card now, but back in the day they really wanted to embarass us and send us up there with that monopoly money looking sh*t.

Also, TEAM FREE OR REDUCED LUNCH FOR LIFE! If you know, you know.
+4   

 2 weeks ago '20        #102
Cmone420 
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 rello99 said




You’ll be able to ball out on these hoes without the dollar menu..
And the shake machine was prob still broke like always.....

 2 weeks ago '06        #103
realgunta  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x3
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simpler times

 2 weeks ago '16        #104
Qbofficial  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2
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 SFamilyRep said
@ racism.......it ain’t hard to tell who the “dirty Brownsville MF’s” he’s referring to. The food stamp jab is also a stereotypical Jab towards POC in the inner city community.

Fam im black n from nore hood in qb.
Stop crying. U sound soft.
+1   

 2 weeks ago '12        #105
Taste Maker 
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so basically in n out

 2 weeks ago '18        #106
HoggUp 
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Orangeade prolly was magically delicious, n*gga.

 2 weeks ago '15        #107
Mal215 
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 Idgafth0 said
And you and your dirty bm gonna be two spots ahead with wic vouchers holding up the line
Arguing and sh*t
+1   

 2 weeks ago '04        #108
profit 
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 Ghezo said
1955 dummy
bro im crying at the amount of kids that think this is 95 or 75 with the price of 10 cent LMAO!
+3   

 2 weeks ago '05        #109
ice wolf 
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 datVAkid said
they did...

 2 weeks ago '04        #110
D1nOnlyMrM@ 
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There’s Sprite at the cookout

How the lemon-lime soft drink courted black customers.

Screenshot via YouTube
CULTURE
There’s Sprite at the cookout

How the lemon-lime soft drink courted black customers.




Ann-Derrick GaillotAPR—16—2018 10:03AM EST
When I’m faced with the choice of beverage at a fast food soda dispenser, I always go for the lemon-lime option, and my No. 1 pick is always Sprite. Is it because I just enjoy the taste? Perhaps. Is it because of some long-forgotten joyful a*sociation with it from my youth? Maybe. Or is it because the company has poured millions of dollars into making sure that I, an African-American hip-hop and basketball fan, would give it my brand loyalty? Perhaps, maybe, possibly — who can say?

It’s a sinister thought to entertain, as an ideally thoughtful consumer — that decades of targeted advertising could actually sway something as personal as what beverage I like to drink. Considering the history behind the soda, it checks out. Following Sprite’s debut in 1961, its advertising primarily focused on the soda’s appeal as a mixer for alcohol like vodka and gin. But in an attempt to up its “cool” factor and appeal to minority and youth markets, in the ‘80s the soda company began a relationship with hip-hop that has come to characterize it as a brand today — the unofficial “black people soda,” even if no executive would admit it.

In his 2012 book The Tanning of America, marketing expert Steve Stoute explored Sprite’s marketing history. “Sprite perceived the potential marketability of the cool emanating from hip-hop culture around the same time that Adidas made a deal with Run DMC,” Stoute wrote. One of Sprite’s first ventures into the “urban” market was a 1986 commercial featuring hip-hop artist Kurtis Blow rapping about the soda in a recording booth. “Without lymon it’s not happenin’ so sorry 7-Up,” he says at one point, using Sprite’s made-up word describing its flavor profile to call out its main competitor.


Sprite’s non-celebrity commercials took on a new look too. The late ‘80s “I like the Sprite in you” was a standard jingle-driven campaign featuring young people, but by 1991, it had incorporated a jingle with a more hip-hop-inspired sound and more appearances of black actors. In 1990, Heavy D and the Boyz and Kid-N-Play followed in Blow’s footsteps with Sprite commercials of their own as part of the “I like the Sprite in you” campaign. Soon, the company would transition to its heavily youth and urban market-focused Obey Your Thirst campaign in 1994.

By the year 2000, R&B group Hi-Five; Kriss Kross; KRS-One, MC Shan, and Kid Capri; Grand Puba and Large Professor; Pete Rock and CL Smooth; Goodie Mob, Fat Joe, Common, Mac 10 and Afrika Bambaataa; A Tribe Called Quest; Nas and AZ; The Lost Boyz; Eve, Angie Martinez, Mia X, Amil, Roxanne Shante, and Kool Keith; and Missy Elliott had all done commercials for Sprite. (Not to mention black basketball players Kobe Bryant, Grant Hill, and Tim Duncan.) From using mega-celebrities like Elliott to rap history icons like Shante and MC Shan, Sprite established itself as the soda of rap fans with an impressive artist roster that predated hip-hop’s ascendence to pop culture mainstay.


This series of Voltron-themed commercials features Goodie Mob, Fat Joe, Common, Mac 10, and Afrika Bambaataa.

The targeting proved successful. According to The Advertising Age Encyclopedia of Advertising, “in 1990 Sprite was a minor product in a competitive soft drink marketplace.” In 2000, Sprite was the No. 5 top-selling U.S. brand and had 58 percent market share in the lemon-lime soda category.

That legacy of celebrity sponsorship nicely paved the way for Sprite’s important music industry collaborations in the new millennium. According to How Cool Brands Stay Hot: Branding to Generations Y and Z, Sprite experienced lagging growth for some time in the early 2000s. In 2010, it brought out the big guns by enlisting superstar Drake in a memorable commercial that featured his head splitting open like a sophisticated robot. In 2012, the company began its continuing partnership with BET, sponsoring the channel’s annual hip-hop Awards and BET Experience music festival celebrity basketball games. In 2015, the company partnered with The FADER to create short branded documentaries about Drake, Nas, Vince Staples, and Isaiah Rashad. And of course, the company continued featuring other hip-hop artists and African-American icons, including Lil Yachty and LeBron James. All these partnerships effectively deepened the soda’s ties to black communities while positioning it ever closer to hip-hop’s sites of production, promotion, and legacy.


This commerical featuring Drake's deconstructed head gave birth to a meme.

Today, Sprite still has a number of hip-hop artists in its roster, the most visible being Vince Staples, whose breakout single “Norf, Norf” begins with the line “bi*ch you thirsty, please grab a Sprite.” (He’d engaged in a long-running gag about promoting Sprite, but then it actually happened.) He, along with fellow sponsees Kamaiyah, DRAM, Lil Yachty, Vic Mensa, and Kap G, all got their own limited-edition Sprite cans featuring snippets of lyrics from their respective songs. This was the latest iteration of a hip-hop lyrics can campaign it began in 2015. And a search of lyrics on Genius.com shows that even hip-hop artists without sponsorships are all too ready to name-drop the product, partially because of its newfound a*sociation with lean.

Looking back, Sprite’s enlisting Kurtis Blow in 1986 was the beginning of the smartest pivot the company could have made, helping to blaze the trail of hip-hop-focused advertising so many companies engage in today. So while people of all ages and races probably drink Sprite, if you’re a black hip-hop fan you can be sure the company has been thinking specifically about you
-2   

 2 weeks ago '04        #111
ROD 
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 Qbofficial said
Fam im black n from nore hood in qb.
Stop crying. U sound soft.
shout out to Lefrak ; spent a few summers with my uncle and aunt

 2 weeks ago '19        #112
BaviBan 
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if two nikkas start f*ghting in there, is Rock & roll gonna start playin??

 2 weeks ago '18        #113
SFamilyRep  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x1
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 Qbofficial said
Fam im black n from nore hood in qb.
Stop crying. U sound soft.
Ok so is Brownsville a white community??

My point was the original remark was racist af. You telling me I sound soft idgaf but what I said was facts. It was a racist statement, Brownsville isn’t a white community, hence why I said “Dirty Brownsville MF’s” was racist and n*ggas trying to act like it wasn’t.

 2 weeks ago '17        #114
Rickter1 
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 Qbofficial said
Let me answer that question with a question.



In the history of forever, has anyone ever told you they going on vacation to East New York or Brownsville?


Ill wait.

 2 weeks ago '16        #115
Qbofficial  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2
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 SFamilyRep said
Ok so is Brownsville a white community??

My point was the original remark was racist af. You telling me I sound soft idgaf but what I said was facts. It was a racist statement, Brownsville isn’t a white community, hence why I said “Dirty Brownsville MF’s” was racist and n*ggas trying to act like it wasn’t.
Fam im black.
+1   

 2 weeks ago '17        #116
Rickter1 
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 Yung Tee said
Is it just me or does pops kinda look like Martin Lawrence?
+1   

 2 weeks ago '17        #117
Rickter1 
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 D1nOnlyMrM@ said


There’s Sprite at the cookout

How the lemon-lime soft drink courted black customers.

Screenshot via YouTube
CULTURE
There’s Sprite at the cookout

How the lemon-lime soft drink courted black customers.




Ann-Derrick GaillotAPR—16—2018 10:03AM EST
When I’m faced with the choice of beverage at a fast food soda dispenser, I always go for the lemon-lime option, and my No. 1 pick is always Sprite. Is it because I just enjoy the taste? Perhaps. Is it because of some long-forgotten joyful a*sociation with it from my youth? Maybe. Or is it because the company has poured millions of dollars into making sure that I, an African-American hip-hop and basketball fan, would give it my brand loyalty? Perhaps, maybe, possibly — who can say?

It’s a sinister thought to entertain, as an ideally thoughtful consumer — that decades of targeted advertising could actually sway something as personal as what beverage I like to drink. Considering the history behind the soda, it checks out. Following Sprite’s debut in 1961, its advertising primarily focused on the soda’s appeal as a mixer for alcohol like vodka and gin. But in an attempt to up its “cool” factor and appeal to minority and youth markets, in the ‘80s the soda company began a relationship with hip-hop that has come to characterize it as a brand today — the unofficial “black people soda,” even if no executive would admit it.

In his 2012 book The Tanning of America, marketing expert Steve Stoute explored Sprite’s marketing history. “Sprite perceived the potential marketability of the cool emanating from hip-hop culture around the same time that Adidas made a deal with Run DMC,” Stoute wrote. One of Sprite’s first ventures into the “urban” market was a 1986 commercial featuring hip-hop artist Kurtis Blow rapping about the soda in a recording booth. “Without lymon it’s not happenin’ so sorry 7-Up,” he says at one point, using Sprite’s made-up word describing its flavor profile to call out its main competitor.


Sprite’s non-celebrity commercials took on a new look too. The late ‘80s “I like the Sprite in you” was a standard jingle-driven campaign featuring young people, but by 1991, it had incorporated a jingle with a more hip-hop-inspired sound and more appearances of black actors. In 1990, Heavy D and the Boyz and Kid-N-Play followed in Blow’s footsteps with Sprite commercials of their own as part of the “I like the Sprite in you” campaign. Soon, the company would transition to its heavily youth and urban market-focused Obey Your Thirst campaign in 1994.

By the year 2000, R&B group Hi-Five; Kriss Kross; KRS-One, MC Shan, and Kid Capri; Grand Puba and Large Professor; Pete Rock and CL Smooth; Goodie Mob, Fat Joe, Common, Mac 10 and Afrika Bambaataa; A Tribe Called Quest; Nas and AZ; The Lost Boyz; Eve, Angie Martinez, Mia X, Amil, Roxanne Shante, and Kool Keith; and Missy Elliott had all done commercials for Sprite. (Not to mention black basketball players Kobe Bryant, Grant Hill, and Tim Duncan.) From using mega-celebrities like Elliott to rap history icons like Shante and MC Shan, Sprite established itself as the soda of rap fans with an impressive artist roster that predated hip-hop’s ascendence to pop culture mainstay.


This series of Voltron-themed commercials features Goodie Mob, Fat Joe, Common, Mac 10, and Afrika Bambaataa.

The targeting proved successful. According to The Advertising Age Encyclopedia of Advertising, “in 1990 Sprite was a minor product in a competitive soft drink marketplace.” In 2000, Sprite was the No. 5 top-selling U.S. brand and had 58 percent market share in the lemon-lime soda category.

That legacy of celebrity sponsorship nicely paved the way for Sprite’s important music industry collaborations in the new millennium. According to How Cool Brands Stay Hot: Branding to Generations Y and Z, Sprite experienced lagging growth for some time in the early 2000s. In 2010, it brought out the big guns by enlisting superstar Drake in a memorable commercial that featured his head splitting open like a sophisticated robot. In 2012, the company began its continuing partnership with BET, sponsoring the channel’s annual hip-hop Awards and BET Experience music festival celebrity basketball games. In 2015, the company partnered with The FADER to create short branded documentaries about Drake, Nas, Vince Staples, and Isaiah Rashad. And of course, the company continued featuring other hip-hop artists and African-American icons, including Lil Yachty and LeBron James. All these partnerships effectively deepened the soda’s ties to black communities while positioning it ever closer to hip-hop’s sites of production, promotion, and legacy.


This commerical featuring Drake's deconstructed head gave birth to a meme.

Today, Sprite still has a number of hip-hop artists in its roster, the most visible being Vince Staples, whose breakout single “Norf, Norf” begins with the line “bi*ch you thirsty, please grab a Sprite.” (He’d engaged in a long-running gag about promoting Sprite, but then it actually happened.) He, along with fellow sponsees Kamaiyah, DRAM, Lil Yachty, Vic Mensa, and Kap G, all got their own limited-edition Sprite cans featuring snippets of lyrics from their respective songs. This was the latest iteration of a hip-hop lyrics can campaign it began in 2015. And a search of lyrics on Genius.com shows that even hip-hop artists without sponsorships are all too ready to name-drop the product, partially because of its newfound a*sociation with lean.

Looking back, Sprite’s enlisting Kurtis Blow in 1986 was the beginning of the smartest pivot the company could have made, helping to blaze the trail of hip-hop-focused advertising so many companies engage in today. So while people of all ages and races probably drink Sprite, if you’re a black hip-hop fan you can be sure the company has been thinking specifically about you
Thread is jokes nobody trying to read all that sh*t LOL

 2 weeks ago '04        #118
D1nOnlyMrM@ 
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 Rickter1 said
Thread is jokes nobody trying to read all that sh*t LOL
To some. But to me, as a constant learner, it helps fulfill a void of the questions in place. Not everyone is a clown and today I learned something new. I completely get what you are saying though

 2 weeks ago '16        #119
AgentOrange 
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 OCT DION said
Why does McDonald's go so weirdly hard for black people? Them and Sprite.
Fun Fact: Howard University is one of 4 universities who loaned money to Ray Kroc to buy McDonalds from the McDonalds brothers before taking them national.


Last edited by AgentOrange; 02-13-2020 at 09:30 PM..

 2 weeks ago '16        #120
icontrell 
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Props total: 4551 4 K  Slaps total: 700 700
 StaRbizzie said
Im more interested in that family crest.
it’s the Rothchild family crest look it up

 2 weeks ago '15        #121
StaRbizzie 
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 icontrell said
it’s the Rothchild family crest look it up

No its not. Why lie then tell me to look it up . Rothschild crest has the solar eagle, chimera, and 2 arms of 5 arrows. Look it up.

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