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Nov 8 - New scientific research looks @ the positive influence Christianity has had on you


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Top 10 most slapped recently  2 weeks ago '04        #26
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 Boogie1790 said
bet we good disregard my last post. @ do be on some bs
one random page of the bible can bring more spiritual enlightenment to an open mind than you can in a lifetime. Consider that a challenge if you think you're some sort of religion k*ller.

Build.

Offer an alternative.

b/c right now you coming off as just another n*gga with an opinion desperate to be heard.

The whole reason you have the opinion you do is because the antithesis to your sentiment exists.... but you're to blind to see that.

and ironically


That's what the article is about

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 2 weeks ago '16        #27
Boogie1790 
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 Exs said
one random page of the bible can bring more spiritual enlightenment to an open mind than you can in a lifetime. Consider that a challenge if you think you're some sort of religion k*ller.

Build.

Offer an alternative.

b/c right now you coming off as just another n*gga with an opinion desperate to be heard.

The whole reason you have the opinion you do is because the antithesis to your sentiment exists.... but you're to blind to see that.

and ironically


That's what the article is about

iM NOT A RELIGOUS k*llER WTF

Top 10 most slapped recently  2 weeks ago '04        #28
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 Boogie1790 said
iM NOT A RELIGOUS k*llER WTF
iM nOt oN SoME BS NEITHER WDF?

y'all dont understand what you're in here arguing for or against.

I posted a study that explains why America is becoming so anti-religious.... because it was psychologically conditioned inversely centuries ago when it was founded.

FACT.

I'm not saying hahahahahah you're all victims like your brain and bias wants you to feel.

I'm telling you that in order to break free you had to be held captive first.

meanwhile... garbage a*s 9-5 internet lives matter n*ggas are gonna come in here and hate on that because they've been clueless as to who their enemy even is.

is it the church? white people? anyone who disagrees with me? society?

if u allow the idea that GOD led these white folks down this very narrow path so that over time it could be studied, broken down and completely broken down then you start to realize how NEEDED it was


Last edited by Exs; 11-08-2019 at 01:38 PM..
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 2 weeks ago '16        #29
Boogie1790 
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 Exs said
iM nOt oN SoME BS NEITHER WDF?
i DISAGREE WITH SOME STUFF BUT YOU RIGHT
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Top 10 most slapped recently  2 weeks ago '04        #30
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 Boogie1790 said
i DISAGREE WITH SOME STUFF BUT YOU RIGHT
i added a very thorough edit to that last post.

don't flip flop neither.... i'm not trying to impress you or win you over bro i just want you to know that if you think like the hasty thinkers in this thread and you attack attack attack without even asking questions...

you get nowhere
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 2 weeks ago '13        #31
SimpinAintEz 
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 Skateboard T said
Itís helped me be a better person but I know it ainít for everybody. And I donít really participate in any organized religion, just follow the general teachings.

Whatever you need to do to bring good in to this world, it ainít my place to say.
Have you asked yourself what improvements you made upon yourself that could not and have not been accomplished secularly?
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Top 10 most slapped recently  2 weeks ago '04        #32
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 SimpinAintEz said
Have you asked yourself what improvements you made upon yourself that could not and have not been accomplished secularly?
he doesn't have to.

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 2 weeks ago '06        #33
Skateboard T 
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 SimpinAintEz said
Have you asked yourself what improvements you made upon yourself that could not and have not been accomplished secularly?
Why would I?

I'm not looking for a reason not to believe...nor am I telling anybody they must believe in religion to be an ethical person.

So no I haven't. I use my spiritual beliefs as well as secular moral philosophy to inform my decisions. Just because I believe in god doesn't mean I disregard non-religious teachings. My undergraduate degree was like 60% moral philosophy lol. If anything my religious beliefs are supplemented and reinforced by my secular moral philosophy.

I don't see the point in criticizing somebody's belief system just because I don't share their beliefs. If you're a good person, that's all that matters, regardless of how you got there.

 2 weeks ago '13        #34
SimpinAintEz 
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 Exs said
he doesn't have to.

No sh*t. Thank you Capt. Obvious. No one a*serted that he had to. Go on somewhere.

Top 10 most slapped recently  2 weeks ago '04        #35
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 SimpinAintEz said
No sh*t. Thank you Capt. Obvious. No one a*serted that he had to. Go on somewhere.
no you don't get it.... he NEVER has to. and if he ever did you're here to provide a peak into that window so that he can rest a*sured his individual decision was an optimal one.

and that's not a criticism of who you are. it's simply a realization that narrow mindedness is toxic to all except those who live by it
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 2 weeks ago '17        #36
JayDaKid 
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 2 weeks ago '13        #37
SimpinAintEz 
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 Skateboard T said
Why would I?

I'm not looking for a reason not to believe...nor am I telling anybody they must believe in religion to be an ethical person.

So no I haven't. I use my spiritual beliefs as well as secular moral philosophy to inform my decisions. Just because I believe in god doesn't mean I disregard non-religious teachings. My undergraduate degree was like 60% moral philosophy lol. If anything my religious beliefs are supplemented and reinforced by my secular moral philosophy.

I don't see the point in criticizing somebody's belief system just because I don't share their beliefs. If you're a good person, that's all that matters, regardless of how you got there.
Iím just trying to understand the desire to appeal to a god when the same goal can be accomplished without doing so. I specifically said ďdesireĒ instead of ďneedĒ because youíve made it clear in your response that you donít think appealing to a god is necessary. Iím not judging you or your belief system, merely trying to understand what draws you to it over a secular equivalent.

 2 weeks ago '13        #38
SimpinAintEz 
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 Exs said
no you don't get it.... he NEVER has to. and if he ever did you're here to provide a peak into that window so that he can rest a*sured his individual decision was an optimal one.

and that's not a criticism of who you are. it's simply a realization that narrow mindedness is toxic to all except those who live by it
Didnít read past the first presumed sentence. Stop attempting to speak for others and sit down somewhere. You want attention so badly. Wait your turn mind reader.
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Top 10 most slapped recently  2 weeks ago '04        #39
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 SimpinAintEz said
Didnít read past the first presumed sentence. Stop attempting to speak for others and sit down somewhere. You want attention so badly. Wait your turn mind reader.
You really do get upset when you're outmatched.
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 2 weeks ago '19        #40
Stand Down 
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 JayDaKid said



 2 weeks ago '13        #41
SimpinAintEz 
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 Exs said
You really do get upset when you're outmatched.
As youíve been told myself and others, your ego is repulsive. Here I am attempting to have a civil conversation with SOMEONE ELSE and you canít help but inject yourself, your presumptions, and your childish condescension into it. Again, go away and wait your turn.



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 2 weeks ago '19        #42
DadeCounty 
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 Exs said





People in the West are psychologically unlike the rest of the world. Global studies find that Western Europeans and their descendents tend to be more individualistic, less conformist, and more trusting of strangers.

But why? New research posits that the medieval Catholic Church, and its emphasis on monogamous marriage and the small family unit as the foundation of society, is responsible.


According to a study published today (Nov. 7) in the journal Science, countries and regions with a longer exposure to the Western Catholic Church are more likely to show the individualist, nonconformist psychology common to Western nations. The church may have inadvertently molded this psychology with medieval-era policies that ended cousin marriages and other tribe-like bonds, and created nuclear, monogamous households.




"Many decades of research has shown that the psychology of Westerners is different from the rest of the world in that it's more individualistic, analytic, and less conforming. However, until now, we didn't have a good explanation for how people in the West ended up having a psychology that was so unique," said Steven Heine, a professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia who was not involved in the current work. "This paper convincingly demonstrates that people's kinship networks are central to their psychology, and that the medieval Catholic Church instituted some policies regarding family structure that had far-reaching impact that continue to affect how people in the West think today, even if they aren't religious themselves."

The story of the new findings began in 2010, when anthropologist Joe Henrich of Harvard University, along with Heine and another colleague, published a study in the journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences pointing out that the vast majority of psychological research has been conducted on what they called "WEIRD" societies: Western, educated, industrialized, rich and democratic. Comparative research between WEIRD societies and non-WEIRD societies suggested that WEIRD research subjects were indeed weird ó less conformist, more individualistic and more trusting of strangers than most of the rest of the world, to name a few differences.

"The findings suggest that members of WEIRD societies, including young children, are among the least representative populations one could find for generalizing about humans," Henrich and his colleagues wrote.

Naturally, these findings raised the questions of how WEIRD societies became so different from the rest of the world. Henrich pondered this question while studying kinship networks in Fiji (a non-WEIRD society) and while reading about the changes in family structure that occurred in Europe during the Middle Ages. He then learned that Jonathan Schulz, now an economist at George Mason University in Virginia, was working on a similar problem. Schulz had been conducting experiments on cooperation around the globe, and was beginning to suspect that how willing people are to cooperate is influenced by their family and kinship circles.

Henrich, Schulz and colleagues began to investigate a major driver of change in the kinship structure of Western nations: The medieval Catholic Church. The Western Catholic Church, starting in about A.D. 500, gradually began issuing edicts having to do with marriage and family. Cousin marriages were banned, along with polygamy, concubinage and many forms of interfamilial marriage that had traditionally strengthened ties within tribes and clans. In these arrangements, families were tied together by overlapping bonds of marriage and blood relationships. This led to what psychologists and anthropologists call ďintensive kinship.Ē In intensive kinship societies, people tend to be highly loyal to their in-group and to distrust outsiders. Theyíre also more likely to value conformity, because survival in these societies means throwing oneís lot in with family and kin. In contrast, societies with less-intensive kinship require people to trust and cooperate with strangers for survival, and encourages individualism and noncomformity to the larger group. In these less-intensive societies, people marry outside of their blood relations and set up independent family lineages.

ďWhat we know about kinship structure before the church entered the scene [in Europe], you see that it's not so much different from the rest of the world," Schulz told Live Science. People lived in tight clans, held together by close intermarriage. By about 1500, though, Europeans were largely living in monogamous nuclear households that were only weakly bound to other nuclear families.

The new study shows that these changes had psychological consequences. The researchers pulled together psychological data at a country level, at an individual level, and among second-generation immigrants who lived in one country but grew up influenced by the culture of another. They then calculated the length of time of exposure to the influence of the Western Catholic Church, both country-by-country as well as regionally within Europe. Exposure was measured by how many years the Western Church held sway in a region. For example, in A.D. 1054, when the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches split, the Western Roman Catholic Church continued a comparatively more aggressive campaign of social engineering in Western Europe, but its edicts werenít relevant in areas where the Eastern Churches had control.

The researchers found that there was a correlation between WEIRD psychology on a countrywide level and exposure to the Western Catholic Church. There wasn't a correlation between WEIRD psychology and the Eastern Church, which fits the hypothesis, the researchers wrote: The Eastern Church issued far fewer edicts involving marriage and family structure, and the analysis found that the length of time under the Western Church, but not the Eastern Church, was correlated to weaker kinship ties. The researchers also measured the intensity of kinship ties and found that the more intensive people's kinship networks, the less individualistic they were.

The researchers controlled for a number of factors that might have provided alternative explanations for the psychological shift, ranging from religiosity and strength of supernatural beliefs to the prosperity of a given region in medieval times. For instance, the researchers wondered if Roman institutions, rather than Catholic marriage policy, could be at the root of these shifts. But the research didnít bear that out, Henrich told Live Science. The Eastern Roman Empire continued in the form of the Byzantine Empire until 1453. If Roman rule was the driver of kinship changes and psychological shifts, former Byzantine areas should have been the most affected by the new psychology. But they weren't.



The Catholic Church's connection explained differences in individualism not just country by country but also regionally within Europe. Regions that spent longer under the sway of the church show more individualism, less conformity and more trust and concern with fairness between strangers. The analysis of second-generation immigrants, born in Europe with parents who immigrated from elsewhere, also revealed the same links between exposure to the Catholic Church, kinship networks and psychology. Those whose mothers immigrated from places with more Catholic Church exposure and less intensive kinship were more individualistic, less conformist and more trusting than those whose mothers came from places less influenced by that Western Church and heavier in intense kinship ties.

Itís unclear how long it takes for people's psychology to change once their social environment does, Henrich said. The church's campaign on marriage and family took hundreds of years to enact. Typically, immigrants to a new nation take on their adopted culture's psychological profile in about three generations, Henrich said.

"We're hoping, in future projects, to try to pull data from written sources to see how psychology was changing," in Medieval Europe," he said.

Also unclear: Whether humanity is inadvertently doing anything today that might alter cultural psychology hundreds of years in the future. It's a tough question, Schulz said, but researchers are interested in the possible psychological effects of China's One-Child Policy. The One-Child Policy, which began in 1980 and persisted until 2015, prohibited most families in China from having more than one child, and changed family structures to be smaller and less sprawling. We donít yet know what, if any, psychological consequences might result.

Catholic edicts on marriage aren't the whole story, but the findings suggest the importance of considering history in understanding psychology."Of course, there is also variation in kinship intensity around the world that doesn't stem from the Catholic Church," Schulz said.



fu*k your religion.. Christians are the biggest pieces of sh*t on earth. I would trust a murder or a rapist before any of you fu*k boys.


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Top 10 most slapped recently  2 weeks ago '04        #43
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 SimpinAintEz said
As youíve been told myself and others, your ego is repulsive. Here I am attempting to have a civil conversation with SOMEONE ELSE and you canít help but inject yourself, your presumptions, and your childish condescension into it. Again, go away and wait your turn.



you're trying to extract data. to feed your anger and resentment. it's the same thing you're doing right now.
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Top 10 most slapped recently  2 weeks ago '04        #44
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 DadeCounty said
fu*k your religion.. Christians are the biggest pieces of sh*t on earth. I would trust a murder or a rapist before any of you fu*k boys.


I don't have a religion.

According to the article that's thanks in large part to the Catholic church.

you're supposed to learn from people's mistakes and improve.

no stagnate. not regress
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 2 weeks ago '06        #45
Skateboard T 
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 SimpinAintEz said
I’m just trying to understand the desire to appeal to a god when the same goal can be accomplished without doing so. I specifically said “desire” instead of “need” because you’ve made it clear in your response that you don’t think appealing to a god is necessary. I’m not judging you or your belief system, merely trying to understand what draws you to it over a secular equivalent.
That's fair, sorry, I read too much into the question.

It's hard to explain, I just have faith. I wish I could give a better answer because I know the lack of reasoning is frustrating for those who want a reason. But I suppose the faith gives me a level of hope when things don't go my way. I think there's an element of having a protector or some force working for me and perhaps what you may regard as coincidentally timely good fortune (or bad fortune) that's reinforced my beliefs. In short, I have my own reasons, that can certainly be explained by natural causes and coincidence, but to me are coincidental enough to be regarded as blessings. And those blessings help me work harder to improve in the same way that understanding secular morality also helps me work harder to improve.

That may be a poor way to articulate it and I imagine those who don't believe in it will regard it as ridiculous because in their opinion there is no force and therefore there's no reason for me to feel that there's a force working for me, but that's about as close as I can get.

That being said, I'm 100% willing to recognize the damage that organized religion can cause and has caused when the religion itself is used as a weapon or a pretext against people.


Last edited by Skateboard T; 11-08-2019 at 02:57 PM..
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 2 weeks ago '19        #46
Stand Down 
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 Skateboard T said
That's fair, sorry, I read too much into the question.

It's hard to explain, I just have faith. I wish I could give a better answer because I know the lack of reasoning is frustrating for those who want a reason. But I suppose the faith gives me a level of hope when things don't go my way. I think there's an element of having a protector or some force working for me and perhaps what you may regard as coincidentally timely good fortune (or bad fortune) that's reinforced my beliefs. In short, I have my own reasons, that can certainly be explained by natural causes and coincidence, but to me are coincidental enough to be blessings.

That may be a poor way to articulate it and I imagine those who don't believe in it will regard it as ridiculous because in their opinion there is no force and therefore there's no reason for me to feel that there's a force working for me, but that's about as close as I can get.

That being said, I'm 100% willing to recognize the damage that organized religion can cause and has caused when the religion itself is used as a weapon or a pretext against people.
Do you believe/have faith in urself?

is it a tie or is ur god who u place ur faith in more than urself?

 2 weeks ago '19        #47
DadeCounty 
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 Exs said
I don't have a religion.

According to the article that's thanks in large part to the Catholic church.

you're supposed to learn from people's mistakes and improve.

no stagnate. not regress


Itís ALWAYS someone elseís fault. Never Christianity lol fu*k outta here n*gga.

 2 weeks ago '06        #48
Skateboard T 
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 Stand Down said
Do you believe/have faith in urself?

is it a tie or is ur god who u place ur faith in more than urself?
both, I don't really quantify it so I suppose it'd be a tie.
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 2 weeks ago '19        #49
Stand Down 
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 Skateboard T said
both, I don't really quantify it so I suppose it'd be a tie.
Maybe u ďneedĒ ur personal ideas of god 2 help/ give u the belief/faith in urself?


Some type of self balance mechanism? A crutch?

 2 weeks ago '13        #50
SimpinAintEz 
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 Skateboard T said
That's fair, sorry, I read too much into the question.

It's hard to explain, I just have faith. I wish I could give a better answer because I know the lack of reasoning is frustrating for those who want a reason. But I suppose the faith gives me a level of hope when things don't go my way. I think there's an element of having a protector or some force working for me and perhaps what you may regard as coincidentally timely good fortune (or bad fortune) that's reinforced my beliefs. In short, I have my own reasons, that can certainly be explained by natural causes and coincidence, but to me are coincidental enough to be regarded as blessings. And those blessings help me work harder to improve in the same way that understanding secular morality also helps me work harder to improve.

That may be a poor way to articulate it and I imagine those who don't believe in it will regard it as ridiculous because in their opinion there is no force and therefore there's no reason for me to feel that there's a force working for me, but that's about as close as I can get.

That being said, I'm 100% willing to recognize the damage that organized religion can cause and has caused when the religion itself is used as a weapon or a pretext against people.
That was actually eloquently put for such a difficult question. So with your theistic beliefs in blessings, are you working to improve in hopes of receiving more of what you perceive to be blessings?

If so, what would be the motivation to do anything secularly? Surely secular reward canít compete with blessings.I would have asked how you distinguish blessings from natural circumstance but I think youíve conceded that itís a faith-based belief.



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