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The Official Organized Crime Thread pt2(news, docs, discussion ect)


 


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 2 weeks ago '16        #626
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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"From serving time in prison in the 1960s, Barnes forged ties to juiced-in Italian mobsters like “Crazy Joey” Gallo of the Colombo crime family and Matty Madonna is the Luchese clan"

first of all it's weird to me how many guys from that era have been dying over the years and Matty Madonna isn't only still alive but about to be tried for murder.............

second, Matty and Nicky were so close that Matty and his brother took a couple of people out for Nicky in the early 60's........

third, Gallo was blowing smoke, as much as I like Gallo( hate to say like but dude had a lion in his basement that was guarded by a dwarf named Mondo) by the time he was in prison with Nicky he was already a dead man walking and he knew it...........wasnt any way he was about to become one NYC's biggest hustler's plug..........

 2 weeks ago '16        #627
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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let me correct myself again, what Frank Matthews did is beyond impressive but Vito Rizzuto faked his own death and is still helping f*ght a war from Venezuela............

@

 2 weeks ago '16        #628
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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Lucchese soldier found guilty in illegal gambling case

A reputed mobster called “bo*bsie” gambled in Manhattan court Friday — and lost.
Eugene Castelle, an alleged foot soldier for the Luchese crime family, had turned down a plea deal from the government that would have likely got him between eight and 14 months in prison on raps including illegal gambling and racketeering.
Castelle decided instead to f*ght his case before a jury and was convicted.
He now faces a sentence of between 30 to 40 months in prison, according to guidelines.
He was allowed to walk free on a $1 million bond.
Castelle was rounded up in 2016 with five other defendants for running an illegal sports-gambling website.
Castelle’s lawyer, Gerald McMahon, said his client was convicted for something that’s becoming increasingly legal in New York — the only difference, he said, is that Castelle was doing it with an “Italian veneer.
“Is gambling still a crime in America?” said. “Do we need to put him in jail for gambling? Come on.”
Castelle was prosecuted alongside Bonnano bosses Joe “Joe C” Cammarano and John “Porky” Zancioccio, who fared better in their trials earlier this year and were able to walk free after a jury acquitted them of racketeering charges.



sh*t like this is probably why Phil Narducci was so quick to take a year instead of taking it to the box...............
+1   

 2 weeks ago '10        #629
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
"From serving time in prison in the 1960s, Barnes forged ties to juiced-in Italian mobsters like “Crazy Joey” Gallo of the Colombo crime family and Matty Madonna is the Luchese clan"

first of all it's weird to me how many guys from that era have been dying over the years and Matty Madonna isn't only still alive but about to be tried for murder.............

second, Matty and Nicky were so close that Matty and his brother took a couple of people out for Nicky in the early 60's........

third, Gallo was blowing smoke, as much as I like Gallo( hate to say like but dude had a lion in his basement that was guarded by a dwarf named Mondo) by the time he was in prison with Nicky he was already a dead man walking and he knew it...........wasnt any way he was about to become one NYC's biggest hustler's plug..........
real sh*t dude been around forever, been in the dope game forever at a high level. in a roundabout way that sh*t probably saved his life since he was in prison from the 70's to the 90's, he missed all the sh*t with amuso and casso.

i don't think anyone can deny that gallo was a likeable dude all things considered. he was a dude that really showed how humans can have so many different sides. gang that couldn't shoot straight is a classic.

 2 weeks ago '10        #630
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
Lucchese soldier found guilty in illegal gambling case

A reputed mobster called “bo*bsie” gambled in Manhattan court Friday — and lost.
Eugene Castelle, an alleged foot soldier for the Luchese crime family, had turned down a plea deal from the government that would have likely got him between eight and 14 months in prison on raps including illegal gambling and racketeering.
Castelle decided instead to f*ght his case before a jury and was convicted.
He now faces a sentence of between 30 to 40 months in prison, according to guidelines.
He was allowed to walk free on a $1 million bond.
Castelle was rounded up in 2016 with five other defendants for running an illegal sports-gambling website.
Castelle’s lawyer, Gerald McMahon, said his client was convicted for something that’s becoming increasingly legal in New York — the only difference, he said, is that Castelle was doing it with an “Italian veneer.
“Is gambling still a crime in America?” said. “Do we need to put him in jail for gambling? Come on.”
Castelle was prosecuted alongside Bonnano bosses Joe “Joe C” Cammarano and John “Porky” Zancioccio, who fared better in their trials earlier this year and were able to walk free after a jury acquitted them of racketeering charges.



sh*t like this is probably why Phil Narducci was so quick to take a year instead of taking it to the box...............
yeah idk what he thought was gonna happen there. gotta take the plea and keep it moving. look what the chin's son just did, just plead guilty, get the sh*t over with, then get back to it. no trial, no publicity. it's a shame too cause i was real interested in seeing esposito go to trial cause of the info that would come out, but no dice..
+1   

 2 weeks ago '16        #631
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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[video - click to view]



Im pretty sure they're right about Staino wanting out of the life and guys not having any issue but I know he was in good standing with Joey and Stevie and Im sure that hasn't changed since he stood up knowing he was leaving the life before he was sentenced by a lot of accounts.........

about those those indictments(pending and otherwise), Joey electric and Sammy piccolo are both free right now and the feds supposedly had the guy they were reporting to dead to rights and were going to do everything in their power to get him indicted before summer. either the case is falling apart somehow(I know the witness is a real fu*k up) or they're building something thats going to bury everybody...........

as far as the Pagans, i saw one earlier which is really fu*king rare around here............

going by history national clubs don't show up here unless they're pissed at a local club..............

 2 weeks ago '16        #632
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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 t from the 617 said
yeah idk what he thought was gonna happen there. gotta take the plea and keep it moving. look what the chin's son just did, just plead guilty, get the sh*t over with, then get back to it. no trial, no publicity. it's a shame too cause i was real interested in seeing esposito go to trial cause of the info that would come out, but no dice..
I agree ............

a lot of people thought Narducci made the wrong move(which really is possible), that case was beyond questionable and their informant is an absolutely deplorable human being and has been tied to terrorism so you know that sh*ts not playing in an East Coast court...........

and with Esposito we both knew deep down he wasn't going to trial.............

Those West Side guys don't go to trial which goes back to his dad or possibly before..........

matter of fact Im pretty sure theres been at least one guy and possibly more that's been k*lled for going to trial in the last 10-15 years..............


Last edited by smokeytheblunt2; 06-11-2019 at 08:01 PM..

 2 weeks ago '16        #633
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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[video - click to view]


this looks like it could be interesting...............

Rossi's NE accent seems bad and Chazz Palmister doesn't seem like he even attempted at using one.......going to be kinda weird cuz Patriarca Sr had one of the most NE accents in history...........

speaking of Patriarca, Im pretty sure that actually green lit the robbery..........

 2 weeks ago '16        #634
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Mob Still In NJ? 3 Big Organized Crime Cases In 2019
One man allegedly k*lled a crime boss. NJ authorities also have two other cases that allegedly involved two prominent crime families.
By Tom Davis, Patch Staff
Jun 11, 2019 8:22 am ET | Updated Jun 11, 2019 10:53 am ET

"The Sopranos" are long gone but the words "crime family" and "mob" are still popping up in major criminal investigations that continue in New Jersey.

And it wasn't just the arrest of a New York man in Brick Township earlier this year, in connection with the broad-daylight shooting of a reputed Gambino crime boss, that brought attention to something that remains a staple in New Jersey.

Indeed, one ongoing case involves suspects who allegedly have ties to La Cosa Nostra in Philadelphia and New Jersey. Those charged were Carl Chianese of Point Pleasant; Michael Gallicchio of Garfield; and Joseph Servidio of Upper Township, according to court documents.

The three allegedly ran a drug operation that distributed methamphetamine, heroin and fentanyl, according to court documents. Indeed, the court documents even use the words "mob" and "mafia" interchangably with La Cosa Nostra.

Here are the three ongoing cases:

Servidio, Chianese and Gallicchio

Servidio, 59, and the U.S. Attorney's Office have been apparently attempting to hammer out a plea deal before the case goes to trial possibly this year, defense attorney Marco Laracca told nj.com.

But the circulation of the criminal complaint made more news this year, especially since it reads like the script from a movie.

The complaint centers around recorded conversations that led to the bust of the drug operation, and it contains several boasts made by Servidio that allegedly point to his ability to k*ll, his membership in La Cosa Nostra and his ability to get out of trouble:

At one point during a recorded conversation, Servidio allegedly discusses "making my bones" at age 19. The court documents say that the phrase "making bones" signifies committing murder.
The documents also said Servidio was identified as a "made member" or "soldier" of the Philadelphia La Cosa Nostra and that drug trafficking plans were approved with the intent to "broker deals, to make (Phladelphia La Cosa Nostra) money, from a distance, so it can't come back (no evidence directly linked to the Philadelphia La Cosa Nostra)."
Servidio also allegedly said this: "Eighty percent of eyewitneses got the wrong person, 80 percent, they, they look like the person ...so without any other corroborating evidence, you know what I mean, you can even beat that, you know...The things you can't beat are the tapes."
And yet another conversation went like this, noting that Servidio's friend's son had died from a drug overdose: "His wife, when I talked to her, she said, 'You're the only person that ever sold drugs that I love,' " Servidio allegedly quoted her as saying. "I despise people because my son OD'd.' She said 'Joe please stop what you're doing (selling drugs), you hurt people.' "
When another person said, "What's wrong with us?" upon hearing that, Servidio allegedly said: "It's the most money I can make. I like to spend money."

Brick Arrest In k*lling Of Reputed Gambino Mob Boss

Anthony Comello, 24, was taken into custody in March in connection with the shooting death of the reputed boss of the Gambino crime family Francesco Cali, the NYPD confirmed.

The accused k*ller was snatched up by the New York/New Jersey Regional Task Force three days after the mobster known as "Franky Boy" was murdered outside his Staten Island home, according to The New York Daily News.

Comello was taken into custody in Brick, about 50 miles from where he allegedly lured Cali to his death. He lured Cali out by staging a car crash, plowing a pickup truck into the mob boss's parked SUV outside his house, according to NBC4 and The Daily News.

Cali, 53, went out to see what happened and was shot dead in front of his home according to police and reports. He suffered multiple gunshot wounds to the torso and was rushed to Staten Island University North where he was pronounced dead, police said.

Comello later appeared before Superior Court Judge Wendel E. Daniels in Ocean County and flashed his palm, showing writing on his hand. The words "MAGA forever" and other scribbles were visible until a court officer told him to stop, according to tweets from Steven Fabian, an Inside Edition reporter.

Morristown Man Guilty In Mob Gambling Scheme

Five men, including one from Morristown, pleaded guilty this year in connection to a gambling and money laundering scheme connected to the Genovese crime family, New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal recently said.

The five men were charged, in varying combinations, in connection with a loan shark operation that netted $4.7 million in interest, a multi-million dollar offshore gambling ring, an unlicensed check cashing business that made $9 million and enabled money laundering and tax fraud and evasion, Grewal said.

All of the illegal operations went to fund "tribute" payments that went to those higher-up in the Genovese family chain of command.



nothing we already didn't know except for Joey Electric making his bones at 19.......

Ive got the day off, Im going to try to figure it out.........

 1 week ago '16        #635
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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New Theory Blames Giacalone Family Mob Connections For Unsolved Massacre In Sterling Heights

(WWJ) When a brutal mob-style execution of three happened in April 1985 in quiet Sterling Heights, Michigan, headlines screamed that it was a drug deal gone bad.

Maybe that was premature.

A new investigation revealed in the Original Gangsters podcast, produced by Roberto Boschian of Macomb County and hosted by mob experts and authors James Buccellato and Scott Burnstein, makes a bold claim.

In the Original Gangsters episode, investigator Jim Sanderson, a retired U.S. Treasury agent and author of "Down The Rat Hole," says members of the Detroit Mafia's famous Giacalone crew carried out the massacre -- a murder that allegedly transpired over unpaid loans and one man's "uppity" attitude.

Sanderson has a special reason to find an answer: His brother Fred Sanderson and brother-in-law Gene Mancen were both slain in the attack. Coined The Time Realty Massacre and covered feverishly by the local media, it happened at the corner of 14 Mile and Hoover. Between $100,000 and $200,000 was stolen in the attack.

Mancen, Sanderson and a man named Joe Termine -- who is suspected of being an accidental victim caught in the wrong place at the wrong time -- were each k*lled when they were knocked unconscious by the butt of a gun and shot in the back of the head by a 22-caliber pistol, per reports.

"This is a very quiet bedroom community, not a lot of crime, not a community that has a lot of organized crime," Buccellato said, adding that from day one it had all the earmarks of a mob hit.

Police were led down the wrong road, Sanderson believes, by by the sight of a pile of cocaine left at the scene, which Sanderson believes was planted, and by witnesses who claimed the cause was a drug deal. The truth is much more complicated.

With help from someone in the Sterling Heights Police Department, Sanderson started investigating after he woke on his brother's birthday in 2018 with the remnants of an intense dream and the words "Down the Rat Hole" on his mind. After intense research, he came up with what he believes is an answer to who k*lled his brother and Mancen, both small-time bookmakers.

To get to that point, know that Mancen was backed by Jewish mob gambling chief, Allen "The General" Hilf and Paulie Leggio, a mob-connected felon, who reportedly provided him protection. Leggio and Hilf were members of the Detroit mafia’s Giacalone crew, Sanderson says.

Who are the Giacalones? "The Giacalone brothers, icy taskmaster Anthony (Tony Jack) Giacalone and good-natured, back-slapping Vito (Billy Jack) Giacalone were the Motor City mob’s junkyard dogs and day-to-day overlords from the 1960s into the 2000s, suspected of ordering or personally carrying out a multitude of gangland homicides in their over half-century in the underworld," gangster.com reports.

For awhile, all was good. Then Mancen allegedly borrowed $50,000 from Leggio and couldn't pay it back. The loan was upped to $200,000. He couldn't pay that either.

"Witnesses overheard two separate shouting matches between Mancen and Leggio in the weeks leading up to the triple murder. Leggio screamed into a payphone at Mr. Paul’s Chop House, a popular mob gathering spot on the eastside, “I want my $200,000….. I’ll k*ll your a*s. You obviously don’t understand who you are messing with here. I’ve been to prison before and I don’t care if I go back.”

In another f*ght, Leggio told Mancen he was getting too big for his britches, and said “it’s going to reach a point where I don’t want the money anymore and you don’t want it to reach that point. It’s your life or the money, one or the other,” gangsterreport.com reported.

Leggio's favorite muscle was Robert "Bobby the Animal" LaPuma. "Not someone you want to meet in a dark alley," Burnstein said.

Knowing Leggio and LaPuma were serious threats, Mancen and Sanderson hired a bodyguard nicknamed "Bad News." Bad News took April 3, 1985, off; death, however, did not.

The bodies of Sanderson, Mancen and Termine were found in the Time-Realty building in a triangle position on the floor.

An FBI informant said he saw Leggio give LaPuma $50,000 in cash 48 hours following the massacre. And according to sources, Hilf received Mancen’s sports book from the Giacalones after Mancen was k*lled.

Leggio was called in front of the grand jury, where he pleaded the Fifth Amendment.

He didn't totally get off, though, as he was indicted in March 1988 on a drug and tax fraud case alongside LaPuma. At the time of his arrest, Leggio had been using Little Gene Mancen’s social security number, gansterreport says.

Despite that evidence, no one has ever been charged in the k*llings.

"My brother solved his own murder ..." Sanderson said, breaking down momentarily when he described how Fred had grabbed a nylon off his k*ller. It was clenched in his hand when his body was found.

Years later, with the development of DNA testing, the nylon was connected to a member of the Giacalone crew, Sanderson said.



another day, more Scott Bernstein............

I wish they'd release more Giacalone wiretap transcripts, the ones that have been released are fu*king hilarious..........

even tho theres a lot out there about them I still wish there was more. I don't think you can really get the full picture unless you're from Detroit........same thing with Frankie The bomb.......

 1 week ago '16        #636
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GR GUEST COLUMN: DID murder OF BLACK DISCIPLES BOSS”BIG LAW” LOGGINS IN CHICAGO SQUARE 30-YR. CYCLE?

Gangster Report correspondent Dave McEvers reports on a generational divide in Chicago’s Black Disciples street gang and an accompanying gangland a*sassination that took place back in the winter on the Windy City’s Southside. November 13, 1989 was an unseasonably warm day for Chicago, temperatures reaching close to 70 degrees by the afternoon and matching the heated vibe spawning from the tough-as-nails south side. The homicide rate in the Windy City jumped from 660 to 742 that year, the tipping point in what would be a near-decade reign of terror in Chicago street gang affairs.

The south side’s Englewood neighborhood is Ground Zero for Chicago street gang culture, dating all the way back to the 1960s and historic shot-callers Larry Hoover and David Barksdale. Hoover’s Gangster Disciples and Barksdale’s Black Disciples gangs merged to form the Black Gangster Disciples Nation, which has grown to become one of the biggest, most powerful and ruthless street gang empires in the United States, boasting over 25,000 members nationwide.

On Monday, November 13, 1989, a f*ght between rival factions of the BGD Nation broke out in Lowe Park located on Englewood’s north edge next to the sorting yards of the Norfolk Southern Rail Yard complex. In a neighborhood like Englewood, the sight of 20 or so young, African-American males scuffling in a park hardly creates any attention. That was until four gun shots rang out, sending the elementary and junior high school aged kids playing in the park and walking home from schools nearby scattering in different directions.

When the dust settled that warm late fall day, one man lay dead: his name was Gregory Freeman, a cousin of the undisputed boss of the Black Disciples Jerome (Shorty) Freeman, busted earlier that year for heroin trafficking and on his way to prison when his baby cousin was gunned down. Gregory Freeman had been f*ghting on behalf of his cousin’s “BDs” against an offshoot group within the Black Disciples family known as the Renegade Disciples.

Fast forward three decades to this past winter. Twenty blocks south of Lowe Park, by Hamilton Park on Englewood’s southern tip, a 46-year old man stood near the open door of his SUV. He had a lot on his mind, trying to make sense of the chaos he saw on the street. The sky was dark and it was a little past 9:00 p.m. on February 6, 2019 when the man was gunned down, shot in the head in front of his Nissan Rogue truck.

Police found Black Disciples “OG” Lawrence (Big Law) Loggins face down in a pool of his own blood sprawled across the truck’s driver’s seat. Thirty years ago, it was Loggins who had k*lled Gregory Freeman in the f*ght at Lowe Park.

Big Law himself admitted to Freeman’s murder, but claimed self-defense. Three young female witnesses who had been on their way home from school as the violence erupted in front of them, contradicted Big Law’s version of events and Loggins was convicted at trial. He served 20 years in prison and was released in 2009, managing to stay out of trouble and off the police radar for a decade before the streets finally caught up with him in February.

At the time he was k*lled, Big Law was the highest-ranking Black Disciple on the “outside.” Big Law’s son, 29-year old Lawrence (Lil’ Law) Lee, runs a subset of the Black Disciples called the Lamron crew, based on Normal Avenue in Englewood (Lamron is Normal spelled backwards), and is in the midst of a 15-year state prison bid for an attempted murder.

Lil’ Law is viewed as the fastest-rising young power in the Black Disciples today, reportedly having enough respect and deference from his soldiers to run day-to-day Lamron business from his prison cell. Not only was his dad an OG, his mom has been described in court records as a female shot caller in the Black Disciples. Popular Chicago-born rappers Chief Keef and Lil’ Durk, pioneers of the “drill rap” movement, often shout out the Lamron crew on their records. Lil’ Durk put out a “RIP Big Law” message on his social media accounts in the hours after Loggins was slain.

The exact motive for Big Law’s murder isn’t known for sure. The old timers in Englewood immediately speculated it was Shorty Freeman’s vengeance from the grave for k*lling his little cousin. Shorty Freeman died of kidney failure in 2012, but still had plenty of loyalists roaming the streets of the south side.

This seems unlikely though once you scratch beneath the surface of the vengeance theory. It’s hard to fathom that Big Law could serve 20 years in the same Illinois State Prison System and at times, the same actual prison itself, as a boss at the level Freeman and his hundreds of inmate soldiers and emerge completely unscathed as Big Law in fact did. And not only did he survive under Freeman’s prison dominance, he actually gained rank in the Black Disciples hierarchy, as Larry Hoover’s “Folk Nation” alliance of gangs was starting to bear fruit.

If Shorty Freeman had wanted revenge, it’s more than likely Big Law would have been murdered in the first few days of his arrival in the state prison system, not 30 years later. Furthermore, if avenging the Gregory Freeman murder played any part in the Big Lay hit, it only served as a symbolic justifiable cover for what was really at play.

The most probable reason for Big Law’s murder was a failed consolidation effort he was spearheading in an attempt to bring all the varying and increasingly-estranged Black Disciples sets from the south side under one banner. Big Law’s vision, per sources, was met mostly with confusion and contempt. He had gained some traction in the years preceding his slaying, bringing together smaller sets from the Englewood, South Shore, Burnside and Roseland neighborhoods, however his overall plan was failing to materialize at the speed and rate he had anticipated, according to sources.

Big Law sealed his fate by pressing his luck and the numerous set bosses for an answer, per sources. He called for a meeting of all the Black Disciples shot callers on the day he was k*lled. The meeting, per multiple news reports, took place on the late afternoon of February 6, 2019 in Englewood, and according to witnesses that were present at the street gang summit, it didn’t go well. A number of shot callers didn’t show, sending Big Law into a tirade, screaming at the ones who did appear before him. In no uncertain terms, he went on to lay down the gauntlet, demanding a new gang structure and street tax.

One person that attended the meeting characterized it as “bizarre” and said, “It was like we were all shaking our heads agreeing with him, but we were all thinking the same thing.”

That “thing” was that Big Law had to go.

Within hours he was dead.

The clash he lost his life to was at least partially generational. The “BGs” (baby gangsters) had knocked off the OG. Rigid hierarchal structure was a thing of the past and the Black Disciples’ BGs wanted it to stay there.

How much of a role ‘Lil Law did or didn’t play in his father’s a*sassination remains a hazy subject. What we do know is that Lil’ Law was caught in the so-called “Great Sicilian Conundrum,” was he to side with his street family or his blood family?

On one hand, avenging his father’s death is acceptable, even necessary to maintain standing in some cases. On the other hand, Lil’ Law is high enough in the Black Disciples organization that it’s reasonable to believe he could of or would have had to have either ordered or sanctioned the hit on his dad. You have to remember, this is a father he never knew possibly using his name to street tax his friends and allies.

The world Big Law knew when he came out of prison in 2009 had drastically changed. Where there had once been an organized army of soldiers, the new street-gang landscape on the south side of Chicago was intensely factionalized and free from formal structure and overall leadership. Big Law decided to try and bring order back to the streets and devised a plan to consolidate all of the Black Disciple cliques, spanning from Englewood to the “Wild Hundreds,” into a consortium of interconnected sets reminiscent of Shorty Freeman’s heyday in the 1980s.

In the two decades Big Law was locked up and off the streets, the entire international economy of drug trafficking had changed though. When he was incarcerated in 1989, crack cocaine was still relatively new and coming in from everywhere. Aggressive state and federal legislation aimed at combatting what had turned into a nationwide crack epidemic, sent droves of African-American gang bangers to prison, creating massive leadership voids. Upon his return to the streets 20 years later, the Mexican Sinaloa Cartel had what amounted to total control of wholesale distribution in the American drug game and Chicago was the cartel’s nerve center in the United States.

Back in Big Law’s younger days of the 1980s, a vast array of small street gang sets spread throughout the city relied on their respective street gang hierarchy to acquire and pass along product down the chain of command and filter money back up. While this structure still exists to some extent, any crew can basically get the same drugs for the same price in Chicago, negating the need for the kind of structure Big Law and the OG’s needed in the past. This new economic climate basically renders an entire generation of OG’s without leadership spots to hold when they return to the streets from long prison stints. From the perspective of many BGs today, the OGs have outlived their relevance, they’re relics from another place and time in history and serve little purpose for the here and now.

Lil’ Law, the king of the Black Disciples’ BG generation, is eligible for parole in 2022. At the very latest, he’ll be home by 2025. We will probably never know the full story of why Big Law was k*lled or if Lil’ Law played any role in his dad’s bloody demise, but almost everyone agrees that the contract and the shooters themselves came from within the Black Disciple family and not a rival gang. This fact in itself speaks volumes.

If the story of Big Law teaches us anything, it’s how difficult the cycle can be to escape. When you think about it, Lil’ Law never had a chance to be anything but a gangster.

And the vicious cycle continues.

By Dave McEvers, managing partner, DRS Chicago, LLC



the timing of Durk's arrest kinda worked in his favor cuz as it stood he was going to be caught in the middle of some sh*t..........

 7 days ago '16        #637
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Meet the New Boss: Profile of Lucchese Mafia family leader Michael “Big Mike” DeSantis
Posted by Gangsters Inc. on June 17, 2019 at 5:52am

By David Amoruso

Lucchese crime family boss Michael “Big Mike” DeSantis got to the top of the hill in an unusual way: A letter from his imprisoned-for-life predecessor Vic Amuso. Still, he put in the work and did the time to get the title. Now law enforcement is watching him closely to see what he does with it.

DeSantis made his money from an auto body shop in Brooklyn that he owned and his interests in waste carting firms. He came up in the crew run by “Fat Pete” Chiodo, a likeable but deadly capo who was big as a whale. In the late 1980s, Chiodo received the contract to murder John Morrissey, a business agent for Local 580 of the ornamental ironworkers union. Morrissey had participated in a window replacement scheme in which the New York Mafia stole millions of dollars from the New York City Housing Authority.

Making his bones

Afraid that Morrissey would cooperate with authorities, Lucchese family boss Vittorio Amuso and his underboss Anthony Casso ordered Chiodo and his crew to k*ll him. They did as they were told and as they dragged out the union boss’ dead corpse, DeSantis was digging a hole with a backhoe. The men threw in the body and covered it up with dirt. This small piece of work earned DeSantis membership in the Mafia. In November of 1989, the family’s leaders gathered in the basement of Peter Vario’s nephew’s home in Canarsie for the induction of five new soldiers, including Richard Pagliarulo, who had fired the shots that k*lled Morrissey, and DeSantis.

Though there is little information about which hits DeSantis was involved in, he is alleged to have been a favored hitman for Amuso and Casso. They also tasked him with the murder of acting boss Alphonse D’Arco, who they suspected would become an informant.

D’Arco (right) was lured to a meeting at the Kimberly hotel in Midtown Manhattan on September 19, 1991. As he talked to his fellow mobsters, he quickly realized something was off. The topics of discussion were hardly the material for such a meeting.

When DeSantis joined him and the others, he knew for certain this wasn’t a meeting, but a hit. The pistol bulging from DeSantis back was a big tip-off as well and D’Arco sped out of the hotel room. The next day, he joined Team America and began cooperating with the FBI.

A stand-up guy

As D’Arco spilled the beans, DeSantis was one of many Lucchese family gangsters that went down. He was sentenced to 21 years in prison. Unlike his intended target, he kept his mouth shut and did his time. He was released from prison on June 28, 2010.

READ: Lucchese mobster planned to escape from Detention Center in Brooklyn
Back on the streets, he now was not only known as a capable k*ller, but as a stand-up guy, which is the biggest compliment a mobster can receive in this day and age of rats and snitches. It is no wonder then that he was viewed by his colleagues as the right person to lead the family. A coded letter from the boss

By this time, his former boss, Vittorio Amuso, was serving life behind bars and Matthew Madonna and Steven Crea (right) were running the Luccheses from their headquarters in the Bronx. Several capos based in Brooklyn had enough of the Bronx leadership however and began complaining about Madonna and Crea to the imprisoned-for-life 85-year-old Amuso.

“Back to Brooklyn”

Lucchese family soldier-turned-government witness John Pennisi recounted how the men sent a coded letter to Amuso. “The administration of the family had shifted to The Bronx,” Pennisi testified in court. “There was a crew of guys very loyal to him out here, all Brooklyn guys, [who] wanted to take the family back to Brooklyn. That’s really what this was about.”

From behind bars, Amuso sent a letter back approving the leadership change. He also provided them a hit list in case the current administration refused to step down. “In the event that they balked or they wanted to hold their positions, we would deal with the guys from The Bronx,” Pennisi said.

READ: Vic Amuso may be imprisoned for life, but his word is still law on the streets of New York
The letter was enough. Despite being locked up for life, Amuso’s word still was law on the streets of New York. Madonna and Crea gave up their positions and stepped down, clearing the way for Michael DeSantis to become the new boss. He will rule a total of seven crews spread out over the Bronx, Long Island, Manhattan, New Jersey, and, of course, Brooklyn.



I still think Al was skimming and it was obvious to Vic and gas who were on the run and probably counting every last penny in those envelopes.......that hotel incident didn't happen like that if at all.........

I know any involvement in a murder is considered making your bones but digging a hole with a backhoe is fu*king hilarious.............

 6 days ago '16        #638
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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Mobster’s son behind dad’s murder at McDonald’s drive-thru: feds


A wiseguy’s son had him whacked in a McDonald’s drive-thru in the Bronx — and was behind the botched hit on his own brother, federal authorities in Brooklyn said Tuesday.

Anthony Zottola Sr. was named in a Brooklyn federal indictment that charges him with murder-for-hire conspiracy, unlawful use and possession of firearms and causing death through use of a firearm.

Zottola’s father, Sylvester “Sally Daz” Zottola, was gunned down on Oct. 4 as he sat in an Acura SUV that was boxed in by other vehicles outside the fast-food eatery at Webster Avenue and Belmont Street.

The elder Zottola, 71, had ordered a medium coffee shortly before being shot in the head, chest and shoulder, law enforcement sources have said.

The reputed Bonanno crime family a*sociate is suspected to have run an illegal gambling operation involving “Joker Poker” video games.

“As alleged, Zottola Sr. set in motion a deadly plot to k*ll his father and brother, with Bloods gang members carrying out extreme acts of violence to collect a payoff for the hits,” said US Attorney Richard Donoghue.

“Zottola Sr. and Shelton referred to the planned murders as ‘filming’ a movie, but thanks to the outstanding work of law enforcement, the ending of their plot will take place in a federal courthouse.”

And FBI a*sistant Director-in-Charge William Sweeney said, “There is apparently no love lost between Mr. Zottola and his family members, so much so he allegedly hired members of the Bloods gang to k*ll his brother and father. After several botched attempts on both men’s lives, sadly his father did not survive the last attack.”

“It looks like it was over the family business — the Joker Poker machines — and the son was looking to take over,” a source said Tuesday.

Investigators initially suspected the hit was ordered by rival Albanian gangsters who wanted to muscle in on the racket.

The k*lling followed an earlier shooting in which another Zottola son, Salvatore Zottola, was critically wounded outside his family’s waterfront compound of three homes in the Locust Point section of the Bronx.

The July 11 attack was intended to “lure out” the elder Zottola so he could be k*lled, according to the feds.

Anthony Zottola and eight alleged co-conspirators — several of whom were arrested previously — were awaiting arraignment Tuesday afternoon.

A ninth defendant was being sought.



that took an interesting turn.............
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 5 days ago '16        #639
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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THE LIGHT OF DAY: PHILLY MOBSTER “JOEY ELECTRIC” COPS A PLEA IN DRUG CASE
Scott Burnstein

June 17, 2019 — Philadelphia mob figure Joseph (Joey Electric) Servidio pleaded guilty to narcotics trafficking charges in federal court this week. Local mobologist Dave Schratwieser was the first to report the plea deal on his social media accounts on Monday afternoon. The 59-year old Servidio was popped in the spring of 2018 for pushing pills, cocaine, marijuana, heroin and crystal meth. Because of a prior 2006 drug conviction, Joey Electric, a contractor in the construction trade and a soldier in the Bruno-Scarfo crime family’s North Jersey wing, faces 12 and a half years in prison when he is sentenced later this year.

The March 2018 indictment out of U.S. District Court in Camden, New Jersey included hours of damning audio surveillance featuring Servidio making a series of incriminating statements where he speaks freely about a past murder he committed when he was 19, trying to carry out a hit on a rival in 2017 and “kicking up” a percentage of his rackets to his superiors in the mafia. And he wasn’t done. He also spoke about how he hides his illegal cash through his construction company and how he had recently attempted a takeover of rackets in Atlantic City before he was instructed to stop by his bosses in Philly. The feds had a bug on Servidio’s phone and both a wired-up informant and an undercover FBI agent recording Servidio’s free-wheeling ramblings on life as a mobster.

Joey Electric was blunt in discussing what he actually does for a living.

“I’m a criminal, everything I do is criminal,” he said. “Ninety percent of my remodeling work is for free, for friends and family…..I need 250k cash in my pocket every year just to break even. I got to put the cash somewhere, I have to be able to show (legitimate) income….Last year, I robbed an armored car just to get even. There’s nothing better than making money (illegally), I do it every day. Who wants to do this other sh*t (legitimate work)?”

Servidio told the informant why he dealt narcotics.

“Drugs is the business I can make the most money in…..I like to spend a lot of money,” he bragged.

He spoke of his intentions to tax independent bookies and dope peddlers in Atlantic City, plans that were squashed before they really ever got off the ground.

“I said (to my bosses), ‘Look, we’re not looking to take over the whole town, people don’t even need to know who the fu*k we are,” Servidio recalled to the informant. “The only time they’ll know who we are is if they give us a hard time. Then we tell ‘em, we puff out our chest and play our trump card.”

His a*sessment of the damage that results from being caught on government recordings is spot on and proved prophetic.

“Tapes k*ll you….almost all the eyewitnesses get the wrong person, you can beat that, you know what you can’t beat? Tapes. Tapes with you saying it right there staring back at you.”

Servidio allegedly reports to old school Bruno-Scarfo Family capo Joseph (Joe Scoops) Licata. Authorities think Licata runs the Philly mob’s North Jersey crew. The informant Joey Electric was doing business with was family soldier Anthony Persiano.



not sure if its a mistake or if Scott maybe throwing some misdirection but theres one little part of the article that is really off..............
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 4 days ago '10        #640
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
Mobster’s son behind dad’s murder at McDonald’s drive-thru: feds


A wiseguy’s son had him whacked in a McDonald’s drive-thru in the Bronx — and was behind the botched hit on his own brother, federal authorities in Brooklyn said Tuesday.

Anthony Zottola Sr. was named in a Brooklyn federal indictment that charges him with murder-for-hire conspiracy, unlawful use and possession of firearms and causing death through use of a firearm.

Zottola’s father, Sylvester “Sally Daz” Zottola, was gunned down on Oct. 4 as he sat in an Acura SUV that was boxed in by other vehicles outside the fast-food eatery at Webster Avenue and Belmont Street.

The elder Zottola, 71, had ordered a medium coffee shortly before being shot in the head, chest and shoulder, law enforcement sources have said.

The reputed Bonanno crime family a*sociate is suspected to have run an illegal gambling operation involving “Joker Poker” video games.

“As alleged, Zottola Sr. set in motion a deadly plot to k*ll his father and brother, with Bloods gang members carrying out extreme acts of violence to collect a payoff for the hits,” said US Attorney Richard Donoghue.

“Zottola Sr. and Shelton referred to the planned murders as ‘filming’ a movie, but thanks to the outstanding work of law enforcement, the ending of their plot will take place in a federal courthouse.”

And FBI a*sistant Director-in-Charge William Sweeney said, “There is apparently no love lost between Mr. Zottola and his family members, so much so he allegedly hired members of the Bloods gang to k*ll his brother and father. After several botched attempts on both men’s lives, sadly his father did not survive the last attack.”

“It looks like it was over the family business — the Joker Poker machines — and the son was looking to take over,” a source said Tuesday.

Investigators initially suspected the hit was ordered by rival Albanian gangsters who wanted to muscle in on the racket.

The k*lling followed an earlier shooting in which another Zottola son, Salvatore Zottola, was critically wounded outside his family’s waterfront compound of three homes in the Locust Point section of the Bronx.

The July 11 attack was intended to “lure out” the elder Zottola so he could be k*lled, according to the feds.

Anthony Zottola and eight alleged co-conspirators — several of whom were arrested previously — were awaiting arraignment Tuesday afternoon.

A ninth defendant was being sought.



that took an interesting turn.............
never would have guessed that in a million years but those text messages were ridiculous if you saw em

also, 200k for the damn hit.. you're prob better off getting a nutjob or fiend to do it for 10% of that and k*lling them after it's done. i knew there was money in those poker machines, they're still all over the bars in mob areas here in MA, but they must really make a k*lling if he was willing to drop 200k to get control of the machines.
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 4 days ago '16        #641
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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 t from the 617 said
never would have guessed that in a million years but those text messages were ridiculous if you saw em

also, 200k for the damn hit.. you're prob better off getting a nutjob or fiend to do it for 10% of that and k*lling them after it's done. i knew there was money in those poker machines, they're still all over the bars in mob areas here in MA, but they must really make a k*lling if he was willing to drop 200k to get control of the machines.
I've seen some of the texts. I was saying in the other thread that if guys in the fu*king 50's and 60's knew to stay away from phones how the fu*k does it miss people in 2019 using smart phones of all fu*king things..........

if it was me(never in a million fu*king years would I hurt or k*ll any family) I would find a and befriend a junky using an alias who i'd supply dope to, convince him to do it and give him a hot shot right after............

idk I've never thought about k*lling my father or any of my brothers...........
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 11 hrs ago '16        #642
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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CRONACA
Born in New York, his true name is Francesco Paolo Augusto Calì
His father had a small shop. He worked for the "escaped" return

Franky Boy, the invisible boss who wanted to have Palermo back

Powerfull and almost unknown. Sicilians said of him: "He's all, over there"
Things got bad when his name began to pop up now and then
by ATTILIO BOLZONI

If Franky Boy hadn't boasted so much to those Sicilian friends of his who insisted they only wanted to meet with him, and who described him as "everything from there", in other words, the guy who gave orders in New York, perhaps right now the most blazoned mafia organization in the world wouldn't be crying it's eyes out. Nor would it be meditating on the idea of retreating to some Caribbean island, or some barren 'tierrà in Venezuela. But Franky Boy's life had been too easy for him to be able to foresee the gloomy future which awaited him, and which would drag his 'family' into ruin. Worse, his two 'families': the Gambino family in America and the Inzerillo family in Sicily. Poor Franky Boy. From the heady heights of command - American ambassador of Cosa Nostra to Palermo - to scapegoat in the biggest Police operation since the times of John Gotti senior.

The mysterious Frank Calì now has a face. The FBI, the Italian police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police have a physiognomy, at last, for a person who they have heard being named over the telephone in whispered half phrases from aspiring Godfathers in the districts of Palermo. He is the invisible personage who everyone wanted to meet, to whom everyone offered a prayer, asked advice, and brought respect. Everyone, everybody, queued up to see Franky, the rising star of the American mafia. Until the other night, his destiny as 'Don' seemed shaped; his roots, his blood ties, his confidence and aspirations. It was all written.

His full name is Francesco Paolo Augusto Calì. He was born in New York on the 26th March 1965. His father, Augusto Cesare, is a native of Palermo and ran a store selling household goods and electrical materials in Ballarò at 21 Via Candelai a district of Palermo. Later he opened a video store called "Arcobaleno Italano Inc" on 18th Street, in Brooklyn. Every two or three months he catches a plane and returns to Palermo with his wife Agata where they reside in a flat surrounded by buildings in the new part of the city, at 58 Via dei Nebrodi. Franky Boy's dad has a clean record, even though the F. B. I has a file on him dating back to some questioning in 1986. He was touched back then by investigations into the Pizza Connection when police discovered that he was a partner of Domenico Adamita, one of the circle of Tano Badalamenti.

The ex shopkeeper from Ballarò sees his first son born in the States. That is where Francesco Paolo Augusto becomes Franky Boy. Between Brooklyn and Cherry Hill.

Frank Boy marries Pietro Inzerillo's sister Rosaria, one of the 'family' from Passo di Rigano, who serves plates of pasta overflowing with " anellini al forno", "sarde" and "beccafico" on the tables of Nino's Restaurant. As a little boy Franky Boy bonds with Jackie D'Amico, the commander of the "decina" (ten man squad) of Cosa Nostra on 18th street. His ascent begins.

American investigators do have some suspicions, though, and open up a file on Franky simply because of his closeness to the "Inzerillo family in Palermo, and to members of the Siderno cartel of the 'ndrangheta". Someone then comes out with a description of just whom that son of Italian emigrants really is. Back in January 1997 in a report on the pact between the mafia of Palermo and New York a reliable F. B. I source told police in the Ist Division of the Central Operations Service of the "Squadra Mobile" of Palermo that Calì Frank, also known as Franky Boy, had been "combined" into the Gambino family.

In 1999 Federal police catch Frank Fappiano and they convince him to collaborate. As a member of the Gambino family he is able to furnish the name of Francesco Paolo Augusto Calì. He tells police that Franky was introduced to him as a 'wiseguy', or 'man of honour'. Four years later another ex-Mafioso 'collaborator', Michael Di Leonardo, also revealed to the F. B. I how Franky Boy's influence in the New York Cosa Nostra was constantly getting stronger.

The year 2003 represents the beginning of regular trips from Sicily to the U. S. It is also the year which witnesses the return en masse of the Inzerillos, the "escapees" from the mafia wars of the eighties, to Palermo from New Jersey. They take up residence in the same houses that they had fled previously to escape extermination at the hands of the Corleonesi. All return to Passo di Rigano, the district in Palermo where they, their fathers and grandfathers were born.

The first to return is Francesco Inzerillo, nicknamed u' truttaturi (sicilian dialect for "the trotter"), son of Pietro Inzerillo of Nino's Restaurant fame. He is also Franky Boy's brother-in-law. The next to return is Tommaso, cousin of the boss Salvatore Totuccio Inzerillo, who was k*lled on 10 may 1981 in Via Brunelleschi. Tommaso is also the brother-in-law of John Gambino and nephew of the old boss of bosses Charles. After that, Totuccio's brother, Francesco, also returns. And so too does Totuccio's other brother, Rosario, and Santo's son Giuseppe. The last to return is Giovanni.

Giovanni is Totuccio's surviving son. He was born in New York in 1972 and is an American citizen. The Inzerillo's who survived Totò Riina's massacre were granted a 'pardon' thanks to the mediation on their behalf by their relatives in Cherry Hill. There was one condition. That they would never set foot in Palermo again for the term of their natural lives. So this collective repatriation opens up a debate within Cosa Nostra. The "Inzerillo affair" divides opinion among the big bosses, who at that time are all free.

One of these is Salvatore Lo Piccolo who spends a word for their reentry, building an alliance which, in his mind, would lift him to the summit of the Sicilian mafia. Antonio Rotolo, on the other hand, a Totò Riina loyalist, is against reentry for fear of vendetta, and the amount of power the Inzerillos might wrest for themselves. As usual Bernardo Provenzano is ambiguous, even two-faced, and is cautiously in favor just as he is cautiously against return. Meanwhile the Inzerillo's are already in Palermo, and no one touches them.

The truth is that all involved - those who want them back, and those who don't - see an economic and financial opportunity to build new business prospects with their American cousins. It is, indeed, an extraordinary opportunity for Cosa Nostra. At the time they are undergoing a liquidity crisis and had lost their leadership position on the International crime scene. It is a rediscovery of America for the Sicilian bosses. And so they send their most trusted members to the U. S. A. They send them to the court of Francesco Paolo Augusto Cali, son of the shopkeeper in Ballarò.

On the 26th Novembre 2003 Nicolà Mandalà and Gianni Nicchi fly off. The former is from the Villabate 'family' while the latter is from the Pagliarelli family, hardliners from the Corleonesi factions. Nicchi is only 25 years old but he is already considered a mafia star. On the 23rd December 2003 Santo's son Giuseppe Inzerillo and Salvatore Greco both depart for New Jersey. On the 22nd January 2004 Totuccio's son, Giovanni Inzerillo, leaves for America in the company of an important mafia figure. His name is Filippo Casamento, an 82-year-old boss who used to command in Palermo and was once the lieutenant of the Boccadifalco family. Before landing in New York the two men stop over a few days in Toronto, Canada. They take a room at the Sheraton. Then they go to the restaurant "Peppino" at 2201 Finch Avenue. Here they participate in a summit. It lasts nine hours around a table with other Sicilo-Americans. Among the present are Michele Modica and Michele Marrese "well known Mafiosi members resident in Canada but natives of Casteldaccia"

The journeys by Sicilians continue throughout 2004, 2005 and 2006. F. B. I agents document every trip. They follow suspects, carry out electronic surveillance, and film every step. And every trip leads to him: Franky Boy.

"He's our friend and he is everything over there," confides Gianni Nicchi to his 'district' boss Antonino Rotolo on October 21st, 2005. "Everything over there" is America. The same America where Nicchi and his buddies negotiate the price of a few kilos of narcotics, out of a consignment of half a ton, which they had just collected from the New York mafia. The America where they whiz around the city in an automobile registered to Haskell International Trading Inc. a company dealing in food distribution with headquarters at 900 South Avenue, Staten Island and administered, it turns out, by Frank Cali. Just one of a list of companies including Circus Fruits Wholesale Corp with head office at 5015 Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn; The two brothers produce Inc on 17th Street; Bontel Usa Corp on Hamilton Avenue; Ox Contracting Inc on 52nd street and Ital Products express Lmt on 3rd Street. All of these companies - in the food or construction business - are registered to Franky Boy or officially to Silvestre Lo Verde an Italo-american known in Brooklyn as "Silvio". Lo Verde is a greengrocer from Palermo who immigrated to the United States in 1988. He has already been in jail convicted of being a drug courier under the orders of Adamita. Silvio's father, Leonardo, is related to the Gambino family of Cheery Hill.

A whole bunch of names united by blood ties, and two families which jumped the Atlantic to become one large clan. And at the centre of it all is Franky Boy.

Franky's name begins to pop up over and over again. The bosses in Palermo speak of him obsessively. His name is on the lips of too many people. All at once he is no longer just one of the many anonymous names in Brooklyn. "But what is happening to our affairs (cose nostre) and to your son's affairs" asks Vincenzo Spatoliatore to Frank's father after Frank's name is splattered over the front pages of Italian and American newspapers a few months before. "The press is hassling," explains a certain Romolo on a direct phone call to his Video Store in Brooklyn. Francesco Paolo Augusto has become too powerful. And he has put himself too much in the public eye. He begins to feel the Federal agents' breath on his neck.

The Inzerillo in Palermo are also on the run. Though they are trying to reform, they sense they are doomed, and under constant control. Their return to Sicily hasn't been quite the triumph they imagined.

"Our names are on the books, we can't stay here any longer, we've got to get out of Sicily, not just Sicily, from Italy, we've got to get out of Europe" complains Francesco Inzerillo u' truttaturi to his nephews Giovanni and Giuseppe when they come to visit him in jail in the summer of 2007.

He's depressed, and hidden microphones capture his mood: "It's all a chain and padlock. You just need an indictment under article 416 bis and they automatically seize all your a*sets. There's nothing worse than having all your a*sets seized" Francesco Inzerillo then gives some advice to Giovanni Inzerillo, son of the big boss from Palermo, in these terms: "You've got to get away to Central America, to South America, far away" he says. Giovanni listens in silence. He is well aware that some of his relatives have already emigrated to that part of the world. They abandoned everything to disappear, perhaps forever. Giovani is disappointed. He would like to become another Franky Boy, and better than Franky Boy; even if it were just for the name he carries, for the one forth mafia nobility inherited from his father Totuccio, from his mother Fillipa Spatola, and from his uncles and cousins, the Gambino's, the Di Maggio's, the Di Maio's and the Castellano's. Giovanni feels ready. Even for others he is ready.

In fact old Filippo Casamento gave him the investiture a few months previously. Casamemto is the one who reassures an American friend who enquired if his godson, the "little one", could "walk". "He walks alright, he walks" Casamento replies

Giovanni Inzerillo is already "walking". He's on the launching ramp for a shining career. In his dreams it will be much more splendid than that of Franky Boy.

(8 febbraio 2008)

Torna su



theres some really interesting sh*t in there..........

I think my new favorite mob conspiracy theory(other than Rizzuto faking his death) is that Cali's death was in fact sanctioned......
+1   

 8 hrs ago '10        #643
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
CRONACA
Born in New York, his true name is Francesco Paolo Augusto Calì
His father had a small shop. He worked for the "escaped" return

Franky Boy, the invisible boss who wanted to have Palermo back

Powerfull and almost unknown. Sicilians said of him: "He's all, over there"
Things got bad when his name began to pop up now and then
by ATTILIO BOLZONI

If Franky Boy hadn't boasted so much to those Sicilian friends of his who insisted they only wanted to meet with him, and who described him as "everything from there", in other words, the guy who gave orders in New York, perhaps right now the most blazoned mafia organization in the world wouldn't be crying it's eyes out. Nor would it be meditating on the idea of retreating to some Caribbean island, or some barren 'tierrà in Venezuela. But Franky Boy's life had been too easy for him to be able to foresee the gloomy future which awaited him, and which would drag his 'family' into ruin. Worse, his two 'families': the Gambino family in America and the Inzerillo family in Sicily. Poor Franky Boy. From the heady heights of command - American ambassador of Cosa Nostra to Palermo - to scapegoat in the biggest Police operation since the times of John Gotti senior.

The mysterious Frank Calì now has a face. The FBI, the Italian police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police have a physiognomy, at last, for a person who they have heard being named over the telephone in whispered half phrases from aspiring Godfathers in the districts of Palermo. He is the invisible personage who everyone wanted to meet, to whom everyone offered a prayer, asked advice, and brought respect. Everyone, everybody, queued up to see Franky, the rising star of the American mafia. Until the other night, his destiny as 'Don' seemed shaped; his roots, his blood ties, his confidence and aspirations. It was all written.

His full name is Francesco Paolo Augusto Calì. He was born in New York on the 26th March 1965. His father, Augusto Cesare, is a native of Palermo and ran a store selling household goods and electrical materials in Ballarò at 21 Via Candelai a district of Palermo. Later he opened a video store called "Arcobaleno Italano Inc" on 18th Street, in Brooklyn. Every two or three months he catches a plane and returns to Palermo with his wife Agata where they reside in a flat surrounded by buildings in the new part of the city, at 58 Via dei Nebrodi. Franky Boy's dad has a clean record, even though the F. B. I has a file on him dating back to some questioning in 1986. He was touched back then by investigations into the Pizza Connection when police discovered that he was a partner of Domenico Adamita, one of the circle of Tano Badalamenti.

The ex shopkeeper from Ballarò sees his first son born in the States. That is where Francesco Paolo Augusto becomes Franky Boy. Between Brooklyn and Cherry Hill.

Frank Boy marries Pietro Inzerillo's sister Rosaria, one of the 'family' from Passo di Rigano, who serves plates of pasta overflowing with " anellini al forno", "sarde" and "beccafico" on the tables of Nino's Restaurant. As a little boy Franky Boy bonds with Jackie D'Amico, the commander of the "decina" (ten man squad) of Cosa Nostra on 18th street. His ascent begins.

American investigators do have some suspicions, though, and open up a file on Franky simply because of his closeness to the "Inzerillo family in Palermo, and to members of the Siderno cartel of the 'ndrangheta". Someone then comes out with a description of just whom that son of Italian emigrants really is. Back in January 1997 in a report on the pact between the mafia of Palermo and New York a reliable F. B. I source told police in the Ist Division of the Central Operations Service of the "Squadra Mobile" of Palermo that Calì Frank, also known as Franky Boy, had been "combined" into the Gambino family.

In 1999 Federal police catch Frank Fappiano and they convince him to collaborate. As a member of the Gambino family he is able to furnish the name of Francesco Paolo Augusto Calì. He tells police that Franky was introduced to him as a 'wiseguy', or 'man of honour'. Four years later another ex-Mafioso 'collaborator', Michael Di Leonardo, also revealed to the F. B. I how Franky Boy's influence in the New York Cosa Nostra was constantly getting stronger.

The year 2003 represents the beginning of regular trips from Sicily to the U. S. It is also the year which witnesses the return en masse of the Inzerillos, the "escapees" from the mafia wars of the eighties, to Palermo from New Jersey. They take up residence in the same houses that they had fled previously to escape extermination at the hands of the Corleonesi. All return to Passo di Rigano, the district in Palermo where they, their fathers and grandfathers were born.

The first to return is Francesco Inzerillo, nicknamed u' truttaturi (sicilian dialect for "the trotter"), son of Pietro Inzerillo of Nino's Restaurant fame. He is also Franky Boy's brother-in-law. The next to return is Tommaso, cousin of the boss Salvatore Totuccio Inzerillo, who was k*lled on 10 may 1981 in Via Brunelleschi. Tommaso is also the brother-in-law of John Gambino and nephew of the old boss of bosses Charles. After that, Totuccio's brother, Francesco, also returns. And so too does Totuccio's other brother, Rosario, and Santo's son Giuseppe. The last to return is Giovanni.

Giovanni is Totuccio's surviving son. He was born in New York in 1972 and is an American citizen. The Inzerillo's who survived Totò Riina's massacre were granted a 'pardon' thanks to the mediation on their behalf by their relatives in Cherry Hill. There was one condition. That they would never set foot in Palermo again for the term of their natural lives. So this collective repatriation opens up a debate within Cosa Nostra. The "Inzerillo affair" divides opinion among the big bosses, who at that time are all free.

One of these is Salvatore Lo Piccolo who spends a word for their reentry, building an alliance which, in his mind, would lift him to the summit of the Sicilian mafia. Antonio Rotolo, on the other hand, a Totò Riina loyalist, is against reentry for fear of vendetta, and the amount of power the Inzerillos might wrest for themselves. As usual Bernardo Provenzano is ambiguous, even two-faced, and is cautiously in favor just as he is cautiously against return. Meanwhile the Inzerillo's are already in Palermo, and no one touches them.

The truth is that all involved - those who want them back, and those who don't - see an economic and financial opportunity to build new business prospects with their American cousins. It is, indeed, an extraordinary opportunity for Cosa Nostra. At the time they are undergoing a liquidity crisis and had lost their leadership position on the International crime scene. It is a rediscovery of America for the Sicilian bosses. And so they send their most trusted members to the U. S. A. They send them to the court of Francesco Paolo Augusto Cali, son of the shopkeeper in Ballarò.

On the 26th Novembre 2003 Nicolà Mandalà and Gianni Nicchi fly off. The former is from the Villabate 'family' while the latter is from the Pagliarelli family, hardliners from the Corleonesi factions. Nicchi is only 25 years old but he is already considered a mafia star. On the 23rd December 2003 Santo's son Giuseppe Inzerillo and Salvatore Greco both depart for New Jersey. On the 22nd January 2004 Totuccio's son, Giovanni Inzerillo, leaves for America in the company of an important mafia figure. His name is Filippo Casamento, an 82-year-old boss who used to command in Palermo and was once the lieutenant of the Boccadifalco family. Before landing in New York the two men stop over a few days in Toronto, Canada. They take a room at the Sheraton. Then they go to the restaurant "Peppino" at 2201 Finch Avenue. Here they participate in a summit. It lasts nine hours around a table with other Sicilo-Americans. Among the present are Michele Modica and Michele Marrese "well known Mafiosi members resident in Canada but natives of Casteldaccia"

The journeys by Sicilians continue throughout 2004, 2005 and 2006. F. B. I agents document every trip. They follow suspects, carry out electronic surveillance, and film every step. And every trip leads to him: Franky Boy.

"He's our friend and he is everything over there," confides Gianni Nicchi to his 'district' boss Antonino Rotolo on October 21st, 2005. "Everything over there" is America. The same America where Nicchi and his buddies negotiate the price of a few kilos of narcotics, out of a consignment of half a ton, which they had just collected from the New York mafia. The America where they whiz around the city in an automobile registered to Haskell International Trading Inc. a company dealing in food distribution with headquarters at 900 South Avenue, Staten Island and administered, it turns out, by Frank Cali. Just one of a list of companies including Circus Fruits Wholesale Corp with head office at 5015 Fort Hamilton Parkway, Brooklyn; The two brothers produce Inc on 17th Street; Bontel Usa Corp on Hamilton Avenue; Ox Contracting Inc on 52nd street and Ital Products express Lmt on 3rd Street. All of these companies - in the food or construction business - are registered to Franky Boy or officially to Silvestre Lo Verde an Italo-american known in Brooklyn as "Silvio". Lo Verde is a greengrocer from Palermo who immigrated to the United States in 1988. He has already been in jail convicted of being a drug courier under the orders of Adamita. Silvio's father, Leonardo, is related to the Gambino family of Cheery Hill.

A whole bunch of names united by blood ties, and two families which jumped the Atlantic to become one large clan. And at the centre of it all is Franky Boy.

Franky's name begins to pop up over and over again. The bosses in Palermo speak of him obsessively. His name is on the lips of too many people. All at once he is no longer just one of the many anonymous names in Brooklyn. "But what is happening to our affairs (cose nostre) and to your son's affairs" asks Vincenzo Spatoliatore to Frank's father after Frank's name is splattered over the front pages of Italian and American newspapers a few months before. "The press is hassling," explains a certain Romolo on a direct phone call to his Video Store in Brooklyn. Francesco Paolo Augusto has become too powerful. And he has put himself too much in the public eye. He begins to feel the Federal agents' breath on his neck.

The Inzerillo in Palermo are also on the run. Though they are trying to reform, they sense they are doomed, and under constant control. Their return to Sicily hasn't been quite the triumph they imagined.

"Our names are on the books, we can't stay here any longer, we've got to get out of Sicily, not just Sicily, from Italy, we've got to get out of Europe" complains Francesco Inzerillo u' truttaturi to his nephews Giovanni and Giuseppe when they come to visit him in jail in the summer of 2007.

He's depressed, and hidden microphones capture his mood: "It's all a chain and padlock. You just need an indictment under article 416 bis and they automatically seize all your a*sets. There's nothing worse than having all your a*sets seized" Francesco Inzerillo then gives some advice to Giovanni Inzerillo, son of the big boss from Palermo, in these terms: "You've got to get away to Central America, to South America, far away" he says. Giovanni listens in silence. He is well aware that some of his relatives have already emigrated to that part of the world. They abandoned everything to disappear, perhaps forever. Giovani is disappointed. He would like to become another Franky Boy, and better than Franky Boy; even if it were just for the name he carries, for the one forth mafia nobility inherited from his father Totuccio, from his mother Fillipa Spatola, and from his uncles and cousins, the Gambino's, the Di Maggio's, the Di Maio's and the Castellano's. Giovanni feels ready. Even for others he is ready.

In fact old Filippo Casamento gave him the investiture a few months previously. Casamemto is the one who reassures an American friend who enquired if his godson, the "little one", could "walk". "He walks alright, he walks" Casamento replies

Giovanni Inzerillo is already "walking". He's on the launching ramp for a shining career. In his dreams it will be much more splendid than that of Franky Boy.

(8 febbraio 2008)

Torna su



theres some really interesting sh*t in there..........

I think my new favorite mob conspiracy theory(other than Rizzuto faking his death) is that Cali's death was in fact sanctioned......
man anything is possible when it comes to these sicilian clans and drugs. plus there has been some fishy sh*t with the comello family. apparently they had another son named alfonse i think who is also f*ghting a case, but not long after the younger comello got arrested the older ones case disappeared entirely from the internet. but it feels so outlandish that he was sent out to k*ll cali like some sleeper agent as opposed to the lone gunman theory that seems to make sense.

as for don vito.. i wouldn't even call that a theory. that man is in DR or Venezuela right now living the good life and still getting dudes popped.
+1   

 8 hrs ago '10        #644
t from the 617 
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$5,185 | Props total: 13109 13109
cali's pops store / social club next door, idk if you remember but i was digging through property records a year or two ago and found that cali owned both buildings by the time of his death


[pic - click to view]




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edit: pics not working gotta figure this sh*t out
+1   

 7 hrs ago '10        #645
t from the 617 
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$5,185 | Props total: 13109 13109
caught this pic of sal testa on my explore page on IG, haven't seen this one before. this guy and the fu*kin cowboy hats

[instagram - click to view]

+1   

 7 hrs ago '16        #646
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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$9,498 | Props total: 22005 22005
Salvie loved his cowboy hats........

 2 hrs ago '16        #647
smokeytheblunt2 5 heat pts OP
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avatar space
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$9,498 | Props total: 22005 22005
 t from the 617 said
man anything is possible when it comes to these sicilian clans and drugs. plus there has been some fishy sh*t with the comello family. apparently they had another son named alfonse i think who is also f*ghting a case, but not long after the younger comello got arrested the older ones case disappeared entirely from the internet. but it feels so outlandish that he was sent out to k*ll cali like some sleeper agent as opposed to the lone gunman theory that seems to make sense.

as for don vito.. i wouldn't even call that a theory. that man is in DR or Venezuela right now living the good life and still getting dudes popped.
his case probably disappeared due to safety concerns but it is odd regardless........

there are a few odd things about the whole thing..........

including the dark undertones of that Italian article from 08............

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