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 7 months ago '05        #126
pnoi89 
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 Coffee said
How do I go about doing a progressive overload properly?
Adding difficulty by linear progression is the first step.

In other words, if your workout for squats is the following:

6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225

Assuming consistent paced reps, 3 minutes rest in between.

The next time you do squats, you progressively overload by say adding 5 lb to each set.

6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230

Let's say you're feeling the difficulty and choose to not increase weight. So the next squat workout:


6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
7 x 230

Even that 1 extra rep is progressively overload.

Other ways to progressively overload is lessening the rest, adding variations such as a pause at the bottom of the squat, slow eccentric and/or concentric, adding resistance bands, etc.

Bringing this to full circle, this is why it's important to be thorough in logging your lifts: reps, weight, sets, rest time, notes on any variations, reps your struggled with, etc.
+4   

 7 months ago '08        #127
get_ate  OP
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 rotstreetz said
Fixed it for ya!
Thanks...

...but for some reason, someone who isn't me answered the question with generic advice that isn't exactly tailored to the individual who asked it.


 Coffee said
How do I go about doing a progressive overload properly?
Your prompting the question leads me to believe that you're a beginner.

As such, it might behoove you to increase the number of reps you do in a given set rather than adding more weight each session.

For instance, you may be programmed to use 25 lbs for 3 sets with a target rep range of 12. For the first set, let's say you were able to hit all 12 reps. On the second set, you were only able to complete 10 reps. On the last set, all you could muster were 8 reps. As we see, you clearly failed to satisfy your target rep range for all 3 sets.

That means that the next time you work out, you would perform the same 3 sets with the same weight. However, you would try to go for 11 reps on the second set and 9 reps on the third, if not more.

You would repeat that each successive week until you're able to hit 12 reps for all three sets with the same 25 lbs.

Once able to do that, you would increase the number of sets. So now rather than 3 sets of 12 with 25 lbs, your objective would be 4 sets of 12 with 25 lbs.

You would go through the same process of increasing your reps as you did for the initial 3 sets until you're able to perform 12 reps for all 4 sets.

Once able to do that, you would then increase the weight, with you using the same weight each workout until you're able to meet the target rep range for all sets (or each individual set if you're pyramiding with ascending or descending counts, which would necessitate a different but similar overall approach).
+3   

 7 months ago '17        #128
Coffee 
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 pnoi89 said
Adding difficulty by linear progression is the first step.

In other words, if your workout for squats is the following:

6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225

Assuming consistent paced reps, 3 minutes rest in between.

The next time you do squats, you progressively overload by say adding 5 lb to each set.

6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230

Let's say you're feeling the difficulty and choose to not increase weight. So the next squat workout:


6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
7 x 230

Even that 1 extra rep is progressively overload.

Other ways to progressively overload is lessening the rest, adding variations such as a pause at the bottom of the squat, slow eccentric and/or concentric, adding resistance bands, etc.

Bringing this to full circle, this is why it's important to be thorough in logging your lifts: reps, weight, sets, rest time, notes on any variations, reps your struggled with, etc.
 get_ate said
Thanks...

...but for some reason, someone who isn't me answered the question with generic advice that isn't exactly tailored to the individual who asked it.



Your prompting the question leads me to believe that you're a beginner.

As such, it might behoove you to increase the number of reps you do in a given set rather than adding more weight each session.

For instance, you may be programmed to use 25 lbs for 3 sets with a target rep range of 12. For the first set, let's say you were able to hit all 12 reps. On the second set, you were only able to complete 10 reps. On the last set, all you could muster were 8 reps. As we see, you clearly failed to satisfy your target rep range for all 3 sets.

That means that the next time you work out, you would perform the same 3 sets with the same weight. However, you would try to go for 11 reps on the second set and 9 reps on the third, if not more.

You would repeat that each successive week until you're able to hit 12 reps for all three sets with the same 25 lbs.

Once able to do that, you would increase the number of sets. So now rather than 3 sets of 12 with 25 lbs, your objective would be 4 sets of 12 with 25 lbs.

You would go through the same process of increasing your reps as you did for the initial 3 sets until you're able to perform 12 reps for all 4 sets.

Once able to do that, you would then increase the weight, with you using the same weight each workout until you're able to meet the target rep range for all sets (or each individual set if you're pyramiding with ascending or descending counts, which would necessitate a different but similar overall approach).
Okay, so I'll tell you what my focus is and what I'm working with.

While I accept the risk of the gym, because of my outside pursuits, I'm very averse to injury in the gym. I use machines and only free weight on my dead lift.

My focus are two lifts: Deadlifts and squats.

I workout with 255 deadlift with perfect/proper form.
I hit that for 5 reps for 3 sets two times a week (Mon and Thursday)
I workout with light on squats on the machine 155 5 reps at 3 sets. (Mon and Thursday)

I struggle on the last set of dead lifts to keep proper form, when I do struggle, I'll leave it in the middle of the last set, recover a little more and then proceed to lift with proper form.

So according to your advice, I shouldn't up my 255 dl until I can handle that last set properly.

So, lets say I handle that in the coming week, which I expect to, so would it be the following week when I add 5 more lbs?

 7 months ago '08        #129
get_ate  OP
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 Coffee said

So according to your advice, I shouldn't up my 255 dl until I can handle that last set properly.

So, lets say I handle that in the coming week, which I expect to, so would it be the following week when I add 5 more lbs?
Correct.

 7 months ago '09        #130
BMAN626 
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Colon cleanse good or bad and what are the benefits

 7 months ago '08        #131
get_ate  OP
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 BMAN626 said
Colon cleanse good or bad and what are the benefits
If you're getting ready for a colonoscopy or have serious constipation, then have at it.

Cleanse your colon!

If that isn't the case, then there's no fu*king reason to do what the body naturally does on its own, which is eliminating waste and bacteria from the digestive system.

Aside from the just mentioned, that of ridding the body of toxins, the purported benefits from colon cleansing include more energy and an improved immune system.

After hundred of years of people using enemas for those reasons, there is still nothing in the scientific literature that backs up those claims.

In other words, the benefits of colon cleansing are full of sh*t, which is apropos.

 5 months ago '05        #132
rotstreetz 
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@ I was thinking about doing muay thai and boxing for cardio. Is it too much to do that and lift weights on the same day?

 4 months ago '08        #133
get_ate  OP
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 rotstreetz said
@ I was thinking about doing muay thai and boxing for cardio. Is it too much to do that and lift weights on the same day?
It depends on your recovery protocol.

If one activity is early in the day and the other is much later and you're eating and hydrating properly between both bouts to recover from the first and prepare your body for the next, then it shouldn't be a problem.

Ideally, I'd break them down into separate days though, especially if muscle building were my main objective.
+2   

 4 months ago '19        #134
ThrowA 
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@ props on posting that food scale. I ordered the same exact one and I fu*king love that thing. Before I was using measuring cups and spoons. I was also taking the weight on the package of the meats and dividing it by how many pieces were in the package to get an average. A scale is a must like you said.


 4 months ago '08        #135
get_ate  OP
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 ThrowA said
@ props on posting that food scale. I ordered the same exact one and I fu*king love that thing. Before I was using measuring cups and spoons. I was also taking the weight on the package of the meats and dividing it by how many pieces were in the package to get an average. A scale is a must like you said.

Glad to have changed your life to the point that all the good things that happen in it are now thanks to me.
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 4 months ago '10        #136
TDP410 
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Does anyone have any info on Sea Moss Gold ? And is it good to give kids (got a 4yr old).

 3 months ago '05        #137
rotstreetz 
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@ Have you heard of metcon training? If so is it more gear towards cardio then muscle building?

 3 months ago '08        #138
get_ate  OP
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 TDP410 said
Does anyone have any info on Sea Moss Gold ? And is it good to give kids (got a 4yr old).
I'm unfamiliar with Sea Moss Gold.

A Google search spits out that "Sea Moss Gold is great for eliminating mucus and fat..."

Further, most of the products with it are holistic in nature and have something to do with ridding the body of toxins, the importance of which is bullsh*t that can't be supported by any scientific research.

Putting all of this together, Sea Moss Gold is unnecessary because there's no need to cleanse the body of mucus. In fact, mucus and phlegm is one of the ways our bodies filter pathogens. Specifically, it's how the lungs get rid of infectious microbes.

Unless you have postnasal drip or some other sh*t that's producing excess mucus, there's no real reason to take something to eliminate mucus or thin the membranes.

As for the other fantastical claims about the benefits of Sea Moss Gold, I can't attest to them, but I'd be skeptical.
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 3 months ago '08        #139
get_ate  OP
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 rotstreetz said
@ Have you heard of metcon training? If so is it more gear towards cardio then muscle building?
Metabolic conditioning (metcon) will help increase your excessive post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), which will help you burn more calories and fat, but it's not going to do much for muscle building.

If you want to get lean and find traditional cardio boring, then incorporate HIIT or metcon (there's a difference between the two). Do otherwise if your intention is building quality muscle.
+2   

 3 months ago '04        #140
mistatnn 
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@ So I work from home. 50-60 hours in front of my computer every week and I’m not gon lie, over the last few years, sippin on the henny has been my wind down when getting off. Of course between this and bad eating habits, I’ve developed a lil gut.

I’m back on my cardio grind jogging 2-3 miles per day right now and eating a whole lot better but what exercises do I need to focus on in the gym? Not expecting an overnight flat stomach but I’m just trying to figure out what focal points I really need to hit

 3 months ago '08        #141
get_ate  OP
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 mistatnn said
@ So I work from home. 50-60 hours in front of my computer every week and Iím not gon lie, over the last few years, sippin on the henny has been my wind down when getting off. Of course between this and bad eating habits, Iíve developed a lil gut.

Iím back on my cardio grind jogging 2-3 miles per day right now and eating a whole lot better but what exercises do I need to focus on in the gym? Not expecting an overnight flat stomach but Iím just trying to figure out what focal points I really need to hit
I'm not sure that I understand your question.

You want to know what exercises you should focus on in the gym.

Okay, I got that part.

What I don't have is what muscle group(s) do you want those exercises for.

For your stomach?

If so, no ab exercise I provide you with will directly burn fat in the abdomen. The body loses fat all over, with some areas losing it faster than others depending on various factors, like where you have a genetic predisposition to hold fat.

Just continue eating a reduced-calorie diet* and incorporating moderate to vigorous physical activity into your week and the fat will eventually melt.

With that said, it's a completely different matter if you're asking what specific exercises can be done to burn more calories.

*You typed that you're "eating a whole lot better". That's very nebulous verbiage that doesn't tell me anything. Why? Because you can still eat better (i.e. healthier) foods and gain weight if you happen to be overeating those better (i.e. healthier) foods. Because weight loss is nothing more than the first law of thermodynamics in effect (i.e. energy in vs. energy out), food quantity is much more important than food quality. As such, it would behoove you to calculate the amount of calories you need to eat per day to be in a caloric deficit and then start weighing your food and counting your calories to make sure you don't go over those calories, if you haven't or don't already.
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 1 month ago '10        #142
TDP410 
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What is the most effective way to lose weight when paired with a good diet. Not worried about building anymore muscle just simply losing the weight.

 1 month ago '17        #143
CityofChampions  topics gone triple plat - Number 1 spot x2
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 TDP410 said
What is the most effective way to lose weight when paired with a good diet. Not worried about building anymore muscle just simply losing the weight.
You want to maintain the muscle you have while losing fat. Putting on muscle is a lot harder than losing fat. Download myfitnesspal. Put in your info and select lose 2 lbs a week. Do a macro split of 50% protein. 30% carbs. 20% fat. Eat the right foods and track everything. You should still lift too.
+1   

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