3,439
 

Ask (Almost) Anything | Cardio, Weights, Nutrition, Supplements, etc.


 


section  x1   |  0 bx goons and 1 bystanders Share this on Twitter       Share this on Facebook
 

section fitness
  
New replies show every 10 seconds
 3 months ago '05        #126
rotstreetz 
space
space
space
$2,363   Props total: 2745 2745
 Coffee said
@get_ate How do I go about doing a progressive overload properly?
Fixed it for ya!
+1   

 3 months ago '17        #127
Coffee  53 heat pts53
space
space
space
$5,132   Props total: 14924 14924
 Coffee said
How do I go about doing a progressive overload properly?
@

 3 months ago '05        #128
pnoi89  18 heat pts18
space
avatar space
space
$14,176   Props total: 11362 11362
 Coffee said
How do I go about doing a progressive overload properly?
Adding difficulty by linear progression is the first step.

In other words, if your workout for squats is the following:

6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225

Assuming consistent paced reps, 3 minutes rest in between.

The next time you do squats, you progressively overload by say adding 5 lb to each set.

6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230

Let's say you're feeling the difficulty and choose to not increase weight. So the next squat workout:


6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
7 x 230

Even that 1 extra rep is progressively overload.

Other ways to progressively overload is lessening the rest, adding variations such as a pause at the bottom of the squat, slow eccentric and/or concentric, adding resistance bands, etc.

Bringing this to full circle, this is why it's important to be thorough in logging your lifts: reps, weight, sets, rest time, notes on any variations, reps your struggled with, etc.
+1   

 3 months ago '08        #129
get_ate  1 heat pts1 OP
space
avatar space
space
$2,009   Props total: 1193 1193
 rotstreetz said
Fixed it for ya!
Thanks...

...but for some reason, someone who isn't me answered the question with generic advice that isn't exactly tailored to the individual who asked it.


 Coffee said
How do I go about doing a progressive overload properly?
Your prompting the question leads me to believe that you're a beginner.

As such, it might behoove you to increase the number of reps you do in a given set rather than adding more weight each session.

For instance, you may be programmed to use 25 lbs for 3 sets with a target rep range of 12. For the first set, let's say you were able to hit all 12 reps. On the second set, you were only able to complete 10 reps. On the last set, all you could muster were 8 reps. As we see, you clearly failed to satisfy your target rep range for all 3 sets.

That means that the next time you work out, you would perform the same 3 sets with the same weight. However, you would try to go for 11 reps on the second set and 9 reps on the third, if not more.

You would repeat that each successive week until you're able to hit 12 reps for all three sets with the same 25 lbs.

Once able to do that, you would increase the number of sets. So now rather than 3 sets of 12 with 25 lbs, your objective would be 4 sets of 12 with 25 lbs.

You would go through the same process of increasing your reps as you did for the initial 3 sets until you're able to perform 12 reps for all 4 sets.

Once able to do that, you would then increase the weight, with you using the same weight each workout until you're able to meet the target rep range for all sets (or each individual set if you're pyramiding with ascending or descending counts, which would necessitate a different but similar overall approach).
+2   

 3 months ago '17        #130
Coffee  53 heat pts53
space
space
space
$5,132   Props total: 14924 14924
 pnoi89 said
Adding difficulty by linear progression is the first step.

In other words, if your workout for squats is the following:

6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225
6 x 225

Assuming consistent paced reps, 3 minutes rest in between.

The next time you do squats, you progressively overload by say adding 5 lb to each set.

6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230

Let's say you're feeling the difficulty and choose to not increase weight. So the next squat workout:


6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
6 x 230
7 x 230

Even that 1 extra rep is progressively overload.

Other ways to progressively overload is lessening the rest, adding variations such as a pause at the bottom of the squat, slow eccentric and/or concentric, adding resistance bands, etc.

Bringing this to full circle, this is why it's important to be thorough in logging your lifts: reps, weight, sets, rest time, notes on any variations, reps your struggled with, etc.
 get_ate said
Thanks...

...but for some reason, someone who isn't me answered the question with generic advice that isn't exactly tailored to the individual who asked it.



Your prompting the question leads me to believe that you're a beginner.

As such, it might behoove you to increase the number of reps you do in a given set rather than adding more weight each session.

For instance, you may be programmed to use 25 lbs for 3 sets with a target rep range of 12. For the first set, let's say you were able to hit all 12 reps. On the second set, you were only able to complete 10 reps. On the last set, all you could muster were 8 reps. As we see, you clearly failed to satisfy your target rep range for all 3 sets.

That means that the next time you work out, you would perform the same 3 sets with the same weight. However, you would try to go for 11 reps on the second set and 9 reps on the third, if not more.

You would repeat that each successive week until you're able to hit 12 reps for all three sets with the same 25 lbs.

Once able to do that, you would increase the number of sets. So now rather than 3 sets of 12 with 25 lbs, your objective would be 4 sets of 12 with 25 lbs.

You would go through the same process of increasing your reps as you did for the initial 3 sets until you're able to perform 12 reps for all 4 sets.

Once able to do that, you would then increase the weight, with you using the same weight each workout until you're able to meet the target rep range for all sets (or each individual set if you're pyramiding with ascending or descending counts, which would necessitate a different but similar overall approach).
Okay, so I'll tell you what my focus is and what I'm working with.

While I accept the risk of the gym, because of my outside pursuits, I'm very averse to injury in the gym. I use machines and only free weight on my dead lift.

My focus are two lifts: Deadlifts and squats.

I workout with 255 deadlift with perfect/proper form.
I hit that for 5 reps for 3 sets two times a week (Mon and Thursday)
I workout with light on squats on the machine 155 5 reps at 3 sets. (Mon and Thursday)

I struggle on the last set of dead lifts to keep proper form, when I do struggle, I'll leave it in the middle of the last set, recover a little more and then proceed to lift with proper form.

So according to your advice, I shouldn't up my 255 dl until I can handle that last set properly.

So, lets say I handle that in the coming week, which I expect to, so would it be the following week when I add 5 more lbs?

 3 months ago '08        #131
get_ate  1 heat pts1 OP
space
avatar space
space
$2,009   Props total: 1193 1193
 Coffee said

So according to your advice, I shouldn't up my 255 dl until I can handle that last set properly.

So, lets say I handle that in the coming week, which I expect to, so would it be the following week when I add 5 more lbs?
Correct.

 3 months ago '09        #132
BMAN626  37 heat pts37
space
avatar space
space
$7,648   Props total: 1194 1194
Colon cleanse good or bad and what are the benefits

 3 months ago '08        #133
get_ate  1 heat pts1 OP
space
avatar space
space
$2,009   Props total: 1193 1193
 BMAN626 said
Colon cleanse good or bad and what are the benefits
If you're getting ready for a colonoscopy or have serious constipation, then have at it.

Cleanse your colon!

If that isn't the case, then there's no fu*king reason to do what the body naturally does on its own, which is eliminating waste and bacteria from the digestive system.

Aside from the just mentioned, that of ridding the body of toxins, the purported benefits from colon cleansing include more energy and an improved immune system.

After hundred of years of people using enemas for those reasons, there is still nothing in the scientific literature that backs up those claims.

In other words, the benefits of colon cleansing are full of sh*t, which is apropos.

 5 days ago '05        #134
rotstreetz 
space
space
space
$2,363   Props total: 2745 2745
@ I was thinking about doing muay thai and boxing for cardio. Is it too much to do that and lift weights on the same day?

 5 days ago '08        #135
get_ate  1 heat pts1 OP
space
avatar space
space
$2,009   Props total: 1193 1193
 rotstreetz said
@ I was thinking about doing muay thai and boxing for cardio. Is it too much to do that and lift weights on the same day?
It depends on your recovery protocol.

If one activity is early in the day and the other is much later and you're eating and hydrating properly between both bouts to recover from the first and prepare your body for the next, then it shouldn't be a problem.

Ideally, I'd break them down into separate days though, especially if muscle building were my main objective.

New replies show every 10 seconds


Sign me up
 
 

yesterday...


most viewed right now
-19online now  33
Image(s) inside THE CRAZIEST PICS You'll EVER SEE! HIP HOP & BLK CULTURE Turn THE ENTI..
161 comments
2 days ago
@wild'ish
most viewed right now
+174online now  32
Video inside Tom from MySpace resurfaced
134 comments
1 day ago
@wild'ish
most viewed right now
+21online now  32
Image(s) inside Yearbook Picture
94 comments
1 day ago
@wild'ish
most viewed right now
-32online now  7
Article inside Royce Da 5'9" Goes At Joe Budden on Twitter Over Logic Diss
95 comments
19 hours ago
@hiphop
back to top
register register Follow BX @ Twitter search BX privacy