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The Official Organized Crime Thread pt2(news, docs, discussion ect)


 
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 3 months ago '16        #676
smokeytheblunt2  5 heat pts5 OP
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Barney's Bravado Gives the Feds Fits
By JERRY CAPECI | May 3, 2007

The Genovese family lived up to its reputation of the "Ivy League of the underworld" in the late 1980s when it tapped a tough, savvy — and quite young — wiseguy to take over as acting boss. Liborio "Barney" Bellomo was only 30 when he stepped into the shoes of aging veteran Anthony "Fat Tony" Salerno after Salerno's conviction and 100-year sentence in the historic Commission case.

Today, at 50, Bellomo is still relatively young. And despite two federal raps and more than a decade in prison, he has proved his mob mettle and is giving the feds fits in their never-ending efforts to nail him for murder and put him away for life.

Charged with a 1998 mob rubout — the Justice Department thought long and hard before opting not to seek the death penalty — as well as racketeering and obstruction of justice, sources say Barney was recently offered an unheard of three-year plea deal by the feds for the obscure crime of misprision of felony. (Gang Land here expands your legal lexicon: Essentially it's knowing that a crime has been committed and not reporting it.)

Most wiseguys, even one like Bellomo, who is due to be released from prison next year, would take that deal in a New York minute — even if they were innocent. But sources say Barney, who has already served 11 years for two earlier plea deals, has tired of what his attorney calls "life on the installment plan" and has rejected the sweet offer.

His first plea deal — in which he took 10 years for two bid-rigging charges — came after he passed three polygraph exams in which he denied taking part in a 1991 murder that he had been charged with.

In recent days, after Gang Land began asking defense lawyers and the feds about the matter, sources say the Manhattan U.S. attorney's office decided to up the ante and hit Bellomo and his brother-in-law, Gerald Fiorino, with extortion charges going back to the 1980s. A revised indictment is expected to be unveiled today at a status conference before Judge Lewis Kaplan.

"He's like a folk hero in the MCC and the MDC, telling the feds to shove it," one mob lawyer said, referring to inmates at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan, which Bellomo has called home since his indictment 16 months ago, and the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn.

Barney's bravado is based in large part on a decided lack of evidence against him. He was incarcerated two years before the murder victim, capo Ralph Coppola, was k*lled, and the main government witness — turncoat mob lawyer Peter Peluso — has made numerous conflicting statements about Bellomo's alleged involvement in the slaying.

As Gang Land reported six weeks ago, Peluso was tape-recorded several times absolving Bellomo of any role in the slaying during a long FBI investigation, once stating that if Barney had been out of prison, "he would have saved Ralphie … he would have tried."

Peluso, a longtime mob a*sociate who for years served as a messenger for Salerno and other family leaders, has told authorities that he met Bellomo when the young mobster was 17 and had been arrested on a gun possession charge, for which he ultimately received three months' probation, according to an FBI report obtained by Gang Land.

Bellomo's father, a reputed Genovese soldier who was close to Salerno and would die from natural causes about a year later, had retained Peluso to represent his son, according to the report, a summary of a Peluso debriefing by agents and federal prosecutors.

Before he passed away from a lingering illness, the elder Bellomo asked "Fat Tony to look out" for his boy because he had no one "on the street other than his father" to watch out for him, Peluso said, according to the report.

"Salerno informed Bellomo's father that nothing would happen to Bellomo," said the report, which noted that the budding gangster was placed in the crew of an East Harlem capo who was close to Salerno and would later serve briefly as a family underboss, Saverio "Sammy Black" Santora.

"Barney remained Barney" until Santora died in 1987. Then, Barney began "doing what Sammy was doing, acting like he was running the show," Peluso said, adding that "it was a shock" to other wiseguys that young Barney "was calling the shots. … Talk on the street at the time was that Chin [Vincent Gigante] put Bellomo in charge of the family."

Peluso's account of Barney's early years jibes with earlier reports, including information from turncoat mobster Vincent "Fish" Cafaro, who cooperated in 1986. In a 1990 court affidavit, six years before Barney's first federal indictment — and three years before Gigante was hit with charges that would lead to his conviction in 1997 — noted federal mob investigator Kenneth McCabe named Bellomo as the family's acting boss.

When Gang Land asked how such a young gangster — Bellomo was 33 at the time — could reach the top of the powerful family, Mr. McCabe said simply, "He's the real deal."

Bellomo's attorney, Barry Levin, blamed his client's current legal problems on "Pete Peluso's story-telling abilities." He declined to discuss any details of his client's plea negotiations, stating: "He's not interested in accepting life on the installment plan from the government. The only thing on Barney's mind, other than his family, is to leave this country when he gets out so the FBI will leave him alone."

Still, Bellomo's taking a big gamble. If convicted of the murder at trial, he faces life.

Thus far, his tough stand seems to have emboldened his brother-in-law's resolve. Fiorino, who was overheard numerous times during the lengthy FBI probe in allegedly criminal discussions with Peluso and an indicted capo who died of cancer last year, John "Buster" Ardito, has rejected a plea deal of six to 12 months in prison, sources said.

Fiorino, 52, who faces racketeering charges that include extortion and money laundering, could get 20 years if convicted at trial. Fiorino's attorneys, Michael Rosen and Jean Graziano, also declined to discuss any plea talks, saying only that they were preparing for trial.

Sources said the new extortion charge against the brothers-in-law stemmed from a tape-recorded conversation in May 2004 during which Fiorino was overheard threatening the wife of a mob capo who refused to make good on a debt after her husband was incarcerated in an unrelated case.

Assistant U.S. attorneys Miriam Rocah, Eric Snyder, and Jonathan Kolodner declined to discuss the case.

In addition to Bellomo and Fiorino, capo Pasquale "Scop" DeLuca and soldiers Arthur Nigro and Ralph "The Undertaker" Balsamo also await trial in the case. DeLuca, 75, is charged with Coppola's murder and faces life. Nigro, 62, and Balsamo, 36, are charged with racketeering and face up to 20 years.

Twenty-nine other wiseguys, mob a*sociates, and drug dealers have pleaded guilty to a variety of charges — or have agreed to plea bargains yet to be carried out — calling for sentences ranging from probation to 10 years.

This column and other news of organized crime will appear today at ganglandnews.com.



fast forward to 2019 and its not even known if he's active or not...........

by all accounts he took a step back when his wife died to be with his kids..........

some people have him as retired, others have him in an advisory role and others still have him as boss.........



 3 months ago '16        #677
smokeytheblunt2  5 heat pts5 OP
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"Barney remained Barney" until Santora died in 1987. Then, Barney began "doing what Sammy was doing, acting like he was running the show," Peluso said, adding that "it was a shock" to other wiseguys that young Barney "was calling the shots. … Talk on the street at the time was that Chin [Vincent Gigante] put Bellomo in charge of the family."


what the fu*k kinda sh*t was this dude on to be made at 20 and to be able to impress Chin enough to pull the above off?

that wasn't just any crew, that was Fat Tony's old crew...........


seems like Im off today, Im half tempted to look up who all came up in the Greenwich Crew from when Genovese was the capo on and the 116th crew starting with whoever was the capo at that time(Trigger Mike possibly?) on.........


Last edited by smokeytheblunt2; 07-08-2019 at 08:21 AM..
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 3 months ago '16        #678
smokeytheblunt2  5 heat pts5 OP
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supposedly the 116th ave crew goes all the way back to Giuseppe Morello................

 3 months ago '16        #679
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Outfit hitman Butch Petrocelli............



(Butch on the right)


Decomposed body of reputed top mob boss identified

Medical examiners said Petrocelli, 43, had been stabbed twice in the chest, his throat slit and his face burned beyond recognition. Authorities speculated a blowtorch was used to obscure his identity. His feet were found bound with rope and masking tape was stuck to his mouth.

The Sun-Times said Harry Aleman, serving a 30-year sentence for running an interstate burglary ring, ordered Petrocelli -- his alleged partner in mob executions -- k*lled when he learned of a scheme Petrocelli had used to collect upward of $100,000.

Petrocelli, as gambling boss, allegedly established new 'taxes' on mob bookmakers and independents paying protection money. The Sun-Times said he told Aleman he would use the money to help support Aleman's wife and to pay for legal appeals.

Aleman's wife, however, never received the money.

Police said Petrocelli's car, with license plates intact, stayed parked on the street for some two months until a 'curious' citizen investigated Saturday. Medical examiners said Petrocelli had been dead about seven weeks.

Petrocelli was thought to have been the hitman in the execution-style murder last November of restauranteur Eleftherios 'Nick' Valentzas, 36, who was to have testified in federal court against three mob figures.

Petrocelli's disappearance came three weeks before his alleged lieutenants -- Frank Renella, Donald Scalise and Nicholas Boulhanis -- went on trial for extortion in an alleged protection racket scheme.

Renella, 50, Petrocelli's alleged muscle man and street collector, also is missing. He dropped out of sight after it was revealed in a pretrial hearing that he once had been an FBI informant.






 3 months ago '16        #680
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Outfit debt collector and Destefano crew member William "Action" Jackson.......












 3 months ago '16        #681
smokeytheblunt2  5 heat pts5 OP
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so an old J-Diggs song that i forgot about popped up on my iPod/iphone 7 being used as an iPod and he says some very interesting things during the third verse starting at the 2:49 mark............



"I know Gene and John Gotti(Jr?) and Joe bambini(Joe Gambino?), see we used to play pinochle and eat linguini "


I can't tell if its just raps or real life..............

I know Diggs is more or less a prison dude so Im sure he's been around the system...........

 3 months ago '16        #682
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Genovese boss’ son should get at least 2 years in prison: prosecutors
By Andrew Denney and Lia Eustachewich July 16, 2019 | 10:46am




The son of infamous bathrobe-wearing crime boss Vincent “The Chin” Gigante should serve no less than two years in prison for extorting a labor union official, Manhattan prosecutors argued in a new filing.

The recommendation that Vincent Esposito serve somewhere between 24 and 30 months behind bars is part of a plea deal he copped in April.

The 51-year-old, the son of late Genovese boss Gigante and his longtime mistress Olympia Esposito, pleaded guilty to a rackeetering conspiracy charge for his role in the crime family’s 16-year shakedown scheme.

He also agreed to forfeit $3.8 million — which prosecutors say he’s now trying to use in a bid for leniency ahead of his sentencing, which is scheduled for Friday but may be postponed.

“Esposito essentially seeks to buy his way out of a prison sentence,” they wrote in court documents filed Monday in Manhattan federal court. “Esposito must be judged by this Court for his own conduct, without regard to his payment of forfeiture.”

The feds also accuse Esposito of painting himself as the victim — and filing “self-serving” motions and bail applications to “downplay the severity of his offense.” He’s been under house arrest at his “multi-million dollar Upper East Side townhouse, in the company and care of his mothers and sisters” pending sentencing, which he’s claimed should be punishment enough for his crimes, prosecutors said.

“Living in one’s own home, surrounded by loved ones, can hardly qualify as just punishment for these offenses, particularly given the means available to Esposito,” they said.

The Probation Office, which makes its own sentencing recommendations, suggested a sentence of 18 months, noting that Esposito has no prior criminal history and an “enlarged aorta.”

But the feds disagreed, saying his criminal conduct lasted well over a decade and that the Federal Bureau of Prisons is more than capable of providing “appropriate medical care.”

The defense has yet to file its own recommendations.

Gigante was best known as the “Oddfather” for wearing a bathrobe and slippers on his jaunts through Greenwich Village — an act the feds claimed was meant to bolster his claims of mental illness.

He died in prison in 2005 at age 77.



it's Chin's son so you know he's taking a plea regardless but it was really smart in this case to do so anyway............
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 3 months ago '10        #683
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
"Barney remained Barney" until Santora died in 1987. Then, Barney began "doing what Sammy was doing, acting like he was running the show," Peluso said, adding that "it was a shock" to other wiseguys that young Barney "was calling the shots. … Talk on the street at the time was that Chin [Vincent Gigante] put Bellomo in charge of the family."


what the fu*k kinda sh*t was this dude on to be made at 20 and to be able to impress Chin enough to pull the above off?

that wasn't just any crew, that was Fat Tony's old crew...........


seems like Im off today, Im half tempted to look up who all came up in the Greenwich Crew from when Genovese was the capo on and the 116th crew starting with whoever was the capo at that time(Trigger Mike possibly?) on.........
according to a guy on one of the forums who seems pretty credible, barney's pops was a soldier and close to fat tony and especially sammy black. barney used to be sammy blacks driver too. sammy black is a guy that kinda got lost in the shuffle of history when it comes to influential genovese guys but he was very powerful. im gonna see if i can find that guys post cause he also mentions that barney went to mortuary school for a year when he was young
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 3 months ago '10        #684
t from the 617 
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big indictments with the gambinos and inzerillos today. arrests in italy, ny, nj, and pa.
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 3 months ago '16        #685
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 t from the 617 said
according to a guy on one of the forums who seems pretty credible, barney's pops was a soldier and close to fat tony and especially sammy black. barney used to be sammy blacks driver too. sammy black is a guy that kinda got lost in the shuffle of history when it comes to influential genovese guys but he was very powerful. im gonna see if i can find that guys post cause he also mentions that barney went to mortuary school for a year when he was young
I never heard of the mortuary school sh*t............

I knew his dad was close to Fat Tony and I knew he drove for Sammy Black but I don't really know anything about Sammy Black.........

 3 months ago '16        #686
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 t from the 617 said
big indictments with the gambinos and inzerillos today. arrests in italy, ny, nj, and pa.
oh fu*k..............


wonder if that would have impacted Cali if he was still here..............
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 3 months ago '16        #687
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oh sh*t, they picked up Rosario and Tommy Gambino(not Carlos son).............

video of them getting brought in..............



Last edited by smokeytheblunt2; 07-17-2019 at 03:30 PM..
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 3 months ago '16        #688
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heard there was an interesting Gangland article this week.............

supposedly The Nose is trying to thinking about or even possibly has shelved Joe C and Porky.........
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 3 months ago '10        #689
t from the 617 
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 smokeytheblunt2 said
heard there was an interesting Gangland article this week.............

supposedly The Nose is trying to thinking about or even possibly has shelved Joe C and Porky.........
that seems to be the case, here's the article if you didn't get to read it

"Mikey Nose Pans Acquittal By Musical Consiglieres; Puts Joe C On A Shelf

Back in March, when a federal jury acquitted acting Bonanno family boss Joseph (Joe C) Cammarano of racketeering charges, Joe C figured he was golden. The clean win in court, courtesy of a jury of his peers, made him the only mob boss other than John Gotti to beat a racketeering rap.
But not everyone in the Bonanno family was cheering. In fact, his own boss was downright furious, Gang Land has learned.
Sources on both sides of the law say Bonanno boss Michael (Mikey Nose) Mancuso, who completed a 15 year prison term for murder conspiracy just one day before the Manhattan jury acquitted Cammarano, was so angry about the trial strategy adopted by Cammarano's winning legal team that he did more than just take him down from his post. Mancuso also put Joe C on the "shelf" — a humiliating move that suspended all his wiseguy rights and responsibilities.
In his place as acting boss, Mikey Nose named aging wiseguy John (Johnny Skyway) Palazzolo, law enforcement sources say. Palazzolo had been Mancuso's original choice for acting boss back in 2015, but as Gang Land reported at the time, Mikey Nose scotched that plan when the feds busted Johnny Skyway for violating his post-prison supervised release (VOSR,) and jailed him for a year. Underworld sources say a panel of wiseguys is a*sisting the 82-year-old Palazzolo.
In his rage, Mancuso, 63, also shelved Cammarano codefendant, consigliere John (Porky) Zancocchio, who was also acquitted. Even that wasn't enough to soothe him. He then put two Cammarano stalwarts — Vito Grimaldi, Joe C's father-in-law, and Joseph Grimaldi, his brother-in-law — on the shelf as well.
Both were capos, and members of the family's Sicilian faction. Vito, 79, and Joseph, 48, own a family-run Queens bakery that Vito's grandfather opened in 1909. In their last brush with the law in 2002, the duo was hit with racketeering charges along with former boss Joseph Massino. Father and son each copped plea deals, and served two year prison terms.
Sources say Mikey Nose blamed all four wiseguys for the trial strategy of lawyer John Meringolo, who honed in on the fact that several Bonanno wiseguys other than Zancocchio had served as the family's consigliere from 2012 to 2018.
As a legal defense, it was a brilliant move: It effectively countered the prosecution's claim that Meringolo's client was the crime family's consigliere during the racketeering conspiracy charged in the indictment.
Right from the start, in his opening statement, Meringolo mocked the allegation that Porky was the family's consigliere.
"This is like musical consiglieres," Meringolo said in his opening remarks, predicting that government's evidence would show that wiseguy Vincent (Vinny TV) Badalamenti was a "consigliere for life," and that Lovaglio would later testify that both aging mobster Anthony Rabito and Simone Esposito was "a consigliere for life."
"So you shake your head," Meringolo continued, "and you're going to say, 'I thought Vinny TV was the consigliere for life.' And then," the lawyer continued, "Pete Lovaglio is going to say: 'Well there was a consigliere for a day.' Then the government is going to say, 'John Zancocchio, he was the consigliere.' This is like musical consiglieres. Musical consiglieres. That's what we're going to see here."
He rammed the same argument home during his questioning of turncoat capo Peter (Petey B.S.) Lovaglio, alerting the jury to the fact that even the government's own evidence would show that three other reputed Bonannos had that rank.
In his closing argument, Meringolo returned to his "musical consiglieres" theme. "Maybe everybody thought I was crazy throughout this trial when I kept saying, 'Who's the consigliere?'" he said, reminding the jury that Lovaglio did in fact testify that yet a fifth Bonanno wiseguy, Johnny Joe Spirito had been "a consigliere for a day."
But the brilliant defense didn't play so well with a mob boss who didn't appreciate the suggestion that he replaced his consiglieres as often as certain presidents switch their chiefs of staff.
Mancuso, "is an old-school wiseguy" who "apparently felt that it was demeaning for the defense to take that tact," opined one mob lawyer who said he had heard that Mikey Nose had put Joe C and Porky on the shelf but had not been able to get an "official explanation" of his reasoning.
"The boss is like the king; he is the king," laughed a law enforcement source who confirmed the demotions and placements of the quartet on the shelf. "I'm not privy to his reasons, but I wouldn't be surprised if there was more than one reason behind the move."
"It's always easy for the boss to find a reason to justify any decision he wants to make," a second mob attorney told Gang Land. "The bottom line is that Mancuso wasn't happy with Cammarano and Porky, and he put them on a shelf."
Gang Land's sources, both underworld and law enforcement, say Mancuso's ire has been building ever since federal prosecutors in Brooklyn lodged VOSR charges against Palazzolo, the boss's first choice to succeed Thomas (Tommy D) DiFiore as acting boss after DiFiore was hit with racketeering charges along with Bonanno soldier Vincent Asaro in 2014.
Sources say Mancuso never wanted Cammarano as his "official" underboss and "acting street boss." But he had no viable alternative after the feds busted Palazzolo in March of 2015, and disclosed that Mikey Nose had been using soldier Frank (Frankie Boy) Salerno to communicate with his choice, Johnny Skyway, from his prison cell in Danbury.
Palazzolo had completed a 10-year stretch for a murder conspiracy and was in the last year of his post-prison supervised release when he was hit with VOSR. By citing info they got from the NYPD's Organized Crime Investigation Division that Johnny Skyway had agreed to use violence to "rebuff an emerging movement by" Cammarano and his cohorts to "take over control of the family," the feds were able to detain Palazzolo, and then keep him behind bars for a year.
Once that happened, Joe C, the popular namesake son of a late Administration member — Joseph (Joe Saunders) Cammarano — with close ties to his influential relatives who were also members of the family's Sicilian faction, had the inside track.
Mancuso's angst escalated, the sources say, when he learned that Joe C had held a meeting of family capos in 2017 at which, according to government prosecutors, the skippers named him as the family's "official boss" and Porky as consigliere. Mikey Nose, who was shipped to a federal prison in Texas after Palazzolo's VOSR, was released into a Bronx halfway house in August.
As it turns out, there probably was a vote, as turncoat mobster Thomas (Sharkey) Carrube testified, and as Bonanno mobster Arthur Tarzia was tape recorded telling Carrube in September of 2017, but it was meaningless. The proof of that is that Mancuso was — and still is — the family's boss, and he has ordered both Joe C and Porky shelved.
During the trial, there was testimony by Carrube, and taped talks between him and Vinny TV Badalamenti, about a Bonanno family feud, with Cammarano, Zancocchio and capo Joseph (Joe Valet) Sabella on one side, and Mancuso, Vinny TV and Carrube on the other.
In one taped conversation about the ongoing dispute, Badalamenti is heard telling Carrube that Zancocchio and his cronies were badmouthing him — quite correctly, it turned out — as an informer.
In a taped talk in January of 2018, after the defendants had been arrested, sources say Vinny TV told Carrube that he wanted to send someone to Meringolo's office to give him a beating for stating at Zancocchio's bail hearing that Lovaglio had told the feds that Badalamenti was the consigliere, not his client.
Stating that his involvement in the case ended with his client's acquittal, Meringolo declined to discuss Gang Land's report that Cammarano or Zancocchio were shelved after the trial. About the trial, the lawyer maintained that he used "the government's evidence" to convince jurors that his client was not guilty. About Vinny TV's taped remarks concerning him, Meringolo said, "I'm at my office six days a week. I've never seen anyone."
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 3 months ago '16        #690
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 t from the 617 said
that seems to be the case, here's the article if you didn't get to read it

"Mikey Nose Pans Acquittal By Musical Consiglieres; Puts Joe C On A Shelf

Back in March, when a federal jury acquitted acting Bonanno family boss Joseph (Joe C) Cammarano of racketeering charges, Joe C figured he was golden. The clean win in court, courtesy of a jury of his peers, made him the only mob boss other than John Gotti to beat a racketeering rap.
But not everyone in the Bonanno family was cheering. In fact, his own boss was downright furious, Gang Land has learned.
Sources on both sides of the law say Bonanno boss Michael (Mikey Nose) Mancuso, who completed a 15 year prison term for murder conspiracy just one day before the Manhattan jury acquitted Cammarano, was so angry about the trial strategy adopted by Cammarano's winning legal team that he did more than just take him down from his post. Mancuso also put Joe C on the "shelf" — a humiliating move that suspended all his wiseguy rights and responsibilities.
In his place as acting boss, Mikey Nose named aging wiseguy John (Johnny Skyway) Palazzolo, law enforcement sources say. Palazzolo had been Mancuso's original choice for acting boss back in 2015, but as Gang Land reported at the time, Mikey Nose scotched that plan when the feds busted Johnny Skyway for violating his post-prison supervised release (VOSR,) and jailed him for a year. Underworld sources say a panel of wiseguys is a*sisting the 82-year-old Palazzolo.
In his rage, Mancuso, 63, also shelved Cammarano codefendant, consigliere John (Porky) Zancocchio, who was also acquitted. Even that wasn't enough to soothe him. He then put two Cammarano stalwarts — Vito Grimaldi, Joe C's father-in-law, and Joseph Grimaldi, his brother-in-law — on the shelf as well.
Both were capos, and members of the family's Sicilian faction. Vito, 79, and Joseph, 48, own a family-run Queens bakery that Vito's grandfather opened in 1909. In their last brush with the law in 2002, the duo was hit with racketeering charges along with former boss Joseph Massino. Father and son each copped plea deals, and served two year prison terms.
Sources say Mikey Nose blamed all four wiseguys for the trial strategy of lawyer John Meringolo, who honed in on the fact that several Bonanno wiseguys other than Zancocchio had served as the family's consigliere from 2012 to 2018.
As a legal defense, it was a brilliant move: It effectively countered the prosecution's claim that Meringolo's client was the crime family's consigliere during the racketeering conspiracy charged in the indictment.
Right from the start, in his opening statement, Meringolo mocked the allegation that Porky was the family's consigliere.
"This is like musical consiglieres," Meringolo said in his opening remarks, predicting that government's evidence would show that wiseguy Vincent (Vinny TV) Badalamenti was a "consigliere for life," and that Lovaglio would later testify that both aging mobster Anthony Rabito and Simone Esposito was "a consigliere for life."
"So you shake your head," Meringolo continued, "and you're going to say, 'I thought Vinny TV was the consigliere for life.' And then," the lawyer continued, "Pete Lovaglio is going to say: 'Well there was a consigliere for a day.' Then the government is going to say, 'John Zancocchio, he was the consigliere.' This is like musical consiglieres. Musical consiglieres. That's what we're going to see here."
He rammed the same argument home during his questioning of turncoat capo Peter (Petey B.S.) Lovaglio, alerting the jury to the fact that even the government's own evidence would show that three other reputed Bonannos had that rank.
In his closing argument, Meringolo returned to his "musical consiglieres" theme. "Maybe everybody thought I was crazy throughout this trial when I kept saying, 'Who's the consigliere?'" he said, reminding the jury that Lovaglio did in fact testify that yet a fifth Bonanno wiseguy, Johnny Joe Spirito had been "a consigliere for a day."
But the brilliant defense didn't play so well with a mob boss who didn't appreciate the suggestion that he replaced his consiglieres as often as certain presidents switch their chiefs of staff.
Mancuso, "is an old-school wiseguy" who "apparently felt that it was demeaning for the defense to take that tact," opined one mob lawyer who said he had heard that Mikey Nose had put Joe C and Porky on the shelf but had not been able to get an "official explanation" of his reasoning.
"The boss is like the king; he is the king," laughed a law enforcement source who confirmed the demotions and placements of the quartet on the shelf. "I'm not privy to his reasons, but I wouldn't be surprised if there was more than one reason behind the move."
"It's always easy for the boss to find a reason to justify any decision he wants to make," a second mob attorney told Gang Land. "The bottom line is that Mancuso wasn't happy with Cammarano and Porky, and he put them on a shelf."
Gang Land's sources, both underworld and law enforcement, say Mancuso's ire has been building ever since federal prosecutors in Brooklyn lodged VOSR charges against Palazzolo, the boss's first choice to succeed Thomas (Tommy D) DiFiore as acting boss after DiFiore was hit with racketeering charges along with Bonanno soldier Vincent Asaro in 2014.
Sources say Mancuso never wanted Cammarano as his "official" underboss and "acting street boss." But he had no viable alternative after the feds busted Palazzolo in March of 2015, and disclosed that Mikey Nose had been using soldier Frank (Frankie Boy) Salerno to communicate with his choice, Johnny Skyway, from his prison cell in Danbury.
Palazzolo had completed a 10-year stretch for a murder conspiracy and was in the last year of his post-prison supervised release when he was hit with VOSR. By citing info they got from the NYPD's Organized Crime Investigation Division that Johnny Skyway had agreed to use violence to "rebuff an emerging movement by" Cammarano and his cohorts to "take over control of the family," the feds were able to detain Palazzolo, and then keep him behind bars for a year.
Once that happened, Joe C, the popular namesake son of a late Administration member — Joseph (Joe Saunders) Cammarano — with close ties to his influential relatives who were also members of the family's Sicilian faction, had the inside track.
Mancuso's angst escalated, the sources say, when he learned that Joe C had held a meeting of family capos in 2017 at which, according to government prosecutors, the skippers named him as the family's "official boss" and Porky as consigliere. Mikey Nose, who was shipped to a federal prison in Texas after Palazzolo's VOSR, was released into a Bronx halfway house in August.
As it turns out, there probably was a vote, as turncoat mobster Thomas (Sharkey) Carrube testified, and as Bonanno mobster Arthur Tarzia was tape recorded telling Carrube in September of 2017, but it was meaningless. The proof of that is that Mancuso was — and still is — the family's boss, and he has ordered both Joe C and Porky shelved.
During the trial, there was testimony by Carrube, and taped talks between him and Vinny TV Badalamenti, about a Bonanno family feud, with Cammarano, Zancocchio and capo Joseph (Joe Valet) Sabella on one side, and Mancuso, Vinny TV and Carrube on the other.
In one taped conversation about the ongoing dispute, Badalamenti is heard telling Carrube that Zancocchio and his cronies were badmouthing him — quite correctly, it turned out — as an informer.
In a taped talk in January of 2018, after the defendants had been arrested, sources say Vinny TV told Carrube that he wanted to send someone to Meringolo's office to give him a beating for stating at Zancocchio's bail hearing that Lovaglio had told the feds that Badalamenti was the consigliere, not his client.
Stating that his involvement in the case ended with his client's acquittal, Meringolo declined to discuss Gang Land's report that Cammarano or Zancocchio were shelved after the trial. About the trial, the lawyer maintained that he used "the government's evidence" to convince jurors that his client was not guilty. About Vinny TV's taped remarks concerning him, Meringolo said, "I'm at my office six days a week. I've never seen anyone."
thats fu*king crazy...........

Joe C had a lot of support, this could get interesting........

 3 months ago '16        #691
smokeytheblunt2  5 heat pts5 OP
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I guess general consensus is that they will all be brought back into the fold eventually if they want to come back............Joe C and Porky have legit money so they might not even care..........

a lot of people also seem to think that Nose was looking for any kind of reason to knock Joe C down cuz the Sicilian faction was getting too strong............

that official boss comment probably didn't help him out much either............

something else to think about, it took a lot for Nose to get made between the drug use and him murdering his own wife and some of the old school guys have never really fu*ked with him..........so him shelving a guy that was around before he was like joe c's father in law might not sit well with them.......

 3 months ago '16        #692
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its one thing to break a guy down(especially if its from admin back to soldier) but its a whole other thing to be shelved...........

Nose probably had it out for Porky too, it was his ex wife that created mob wives, TG got shelved for birthing them so I can only imagine there was some resentment towards Porky for his ex wife creating it........his ex wife is kinda hot btw.........
+1   

 3 months ago '16        #693
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speaking of Nose I just found this article and some of it is on the Purple Gang...........its an ed scarpo article so there might be some bs in there. interesting none the less........

Purple Gang Alumnus Mikey Nose Mancuso, Bonanno Boss, Will Be Back On The Street In March
By Ed Scarpo Thursday, December 20, 2018



(Angelo Prisco on the left, michael meldish on the right)

This Christmas should be merrier than usual for reputed Bonanno crime family boss Michael (The Nose) Mancuso, who moved into a halfway house in Brooklyn earlier this year. Mancuso is now less than three months away from his March 12 release date from Brooklyn's RRM, or Residential Reentry Management field office. Mancuso was sentenced to 15 years in prison for the December 1, 2004, murder of Bonanno a*sociate Randolph Pizzolo, whose bullet-riddled body was found face down in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn.

Mancuso was lucky: he had faced life in prison under the original indictment, but following his plea deal, Judge Nicholas Garaufis had to max out the sentence at 15 years. (Originally, the Pizzolo murder almost marked Mancuso's end as he and former Bonanno acting boss Vincent Basciano were both declared to be eligible for the death penalty.) Mancuso is a veteran at doing time; and being convicted of murder. He served a long stretch in the 1980s for k*lling his wife. (Yes, k*lling his own wife. He left her body on a bench outside a hospital and later had his lawyers argue it had all been an accident.) Mancuso was arrested after stepping off a plane in Las Vegas in February of 2006 for the Pizzolo hit.


Who was Randy Pizzolo?

The jury at Basciano's 2011 trial heard a recording of Basciano telling former Bonanno boss Joseph Massino that Pizzolo was a "dangerous kid" who had to go -- and that the murder would be "a good wake-up call" for other wayward gangsters.

When his body was found in a desolate part of Brooklyn, it was quite evident that a mob hit had gone down... Pizzolo still wore an expensive wristwatch and pinkie ring, and had about $1,000 in his pocket. (He even still held a cigarette lighter in one hand.) And not far from the body, parked at the curb with the engine still idling was Pizzolo's BMW 545i...

"I told him his mouth was going to get him in trouble one day," retired undercover FBI agent Jack Garcia once said of Pizzolo.. Garcia also recalled how one night Pizzolo had strutted into a Manhattan restaurant and offered to buy drinks for everyone -- "except the fed" after he was pointed out.

Anthony (Ace) Aiello, who admitted to being the gunman, was sentenced to 30 years. As part of the same case, Anthony (Bruno) Indelicato (who was accused of plotting to k*ll a rival by masquerading as a police officer) and Anthony (Little Anthony) Donato were sentenced to 20 and 25 years, respectively. Vincent (Vinny Gorgeous) Basciano was sentenced to life.*

Pizzolo wanted to become a made member of the Bonanno family more than anything else in the world. "He [Pizzolo] was what you might call a 'wanna-be,'" a*sistant Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Nicole Argentieri told the jury at Basciano's 2011 trial.



(Randy Pizzolo's body and still running car)

"What Randy Pizzolo wanted to be more than anything was an inducted member of organized crime, a made man in the Mafia."

Ironically, Basciano initially was fond of Pizzolo and had even proposed him for membership. Then he must have realized his a*sessment of Pizzolo had been incorrect. Still, it seems he gave the man opportunities to change his ways. When Pizzolo shot someone outside Caffe on the Green in Queens, Basciano decided to give him a second chance. Eventually, Basciano reached his limit. One of the last straws is believed to have been when Pizzolo, while idling time in another Queens eatery, began drunkenly boasting aloud that he was the only real k*ller in the Bonanno crime family. Mancuso was allegedly crowned to the top slot in 2012-2013 while behind bars serving this sentence.

"Mancuso’s the boss and he’s running the family from jail,” a law enforcement source said at the time.

Mancuso may have tried to stretch his muscles as Bonanno boss from behind bars by ordering the beating of a Luchese a*sociate, something that helped make him an early suspect in the 2013 murder of Luchese a*sociate Michael Meldish. Michael Nose allegedly ordered the beating because Meldish had refused to cease a relationship with a former girlfriend of Mancuso's.

What must've really humiliated Meldish, though, was that he would've remembered when he was the boss of Mancuso when the two of them were members of New York's notorious Purple Gang.


The Color Purple
The violent East Harlem-based Purple Gang, which reportedly boasted more than 100 members at one time, dealt drugs, sold firearms, and k*lled people back in the 1970s and 1980s. Members, who reportedly spent their youths running errands for drug dealers, were linked to the Bonanno, Luchese, and Genovese crime families.

By the 1980s, members increasingly were apprehended in drug busts. Some of the remaining members then joined the 116th Street Crew, with some landing buttons in crime families. For one, Purple Gang member Angelo Prisco, see picture at top, rose to capo in the Genovese crime family.

Some, including Mancuso, rose to management positions. Daniel Leo, who was a member of the Purple Gang (during his time with the crew he was suspected of participating in at least two homicides in the 1970s) was outed by Jerry Capeci as acting boss of the Genovese crime family in November 2006. Leo was living in a $2 million home in Rockleigh, N.J., a town on the Palisades at the time.(In May 2007, members of the FBI's Genovese squad cornered and arrested him there on federal loan sharking and extortion charges.)

Mikey Nose ordered a Bonanno mobster to administer a beating to Meldish "for what Mancuso considered disrespectful acts toward Mancuso on Meldish's part," according to a court filing by Manhattan prosecutors against nine Bonanno family mobsters and a*sociates hit with state racketeering charges in July of 2013.

An unidentified informant told the feds that Bonanno acting capo Ernest Aiello caught up with Meldish in August of 2012 in uptown Manhattan, outside East Harlem's infamous Rao's restaurant. Making things worse for Meldish, he was reportedly beaten right amid the annual Pleasant Avenue Festival that honors Saint Anthony of Padua.

Even in the years since many Italian-Americans moved out of the neighborhood, they have gathered in East Harlem for the festival every year for more than 100 years. Each year, hundreds of members of the Giglio Society of East Harlem -- a group of men who have dedicated their lives to honor San Antonio, their beloved saint -- build and lift a large tower in honor of St. Anthony of Padua. That means plenty of bystanders and very possibly more than a few wiseguys stood on the street and watched Meldish get his a*s kicked -- possibly while biting into zeppoles.

The Feds provided a thumbnail sketch of Mancuso in a 5K document written for another former Bonanno member: "Mancuso has a long history of involvement in crimes and acts of violence...As the Court knows, Mancuso has a serious criminal history including a 1978 New York state felony conviction for criminal possession of a weapon, a 1986 New York state felony conviction for manslaughter (for the k*lling of his wife), and various 1996 New York state misdemeanor convictions for menacing, a*sault, resisting arrest, and attempted a*sault."


 3 months ago '16        #694
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at a yearly Bonanno x-mas party(seriously)..............

 3 months ago '16        #695
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The Purple Gang originated in Italian Harlem as an Italian-American youth street gang and were involved in various robberies and a*saults before engaging in more organized criminal activity. Many of its founding members were related, some as brothers or cousins.[1] When they first drifted into the narcotics business, the gang originally acted only as "delivery boys" or "spotters" (i.e. lookouts) for local established Italian mafiosi involved with the drug trade.[6] However, the Purple Gang eventually rose to power in the Harlem drug trafficking business and subsequently graduated to committing murders following the 1973 arrests and convictions of several powerful Italian-American Mafia figures who had until then been dominating heroin and narcotics distribution in East Harlem. The 1973 arrests largely involved high-ranking mafiosi involved in the so-called "French Connection" heroin smuggling ring, such as Louis Inglese and Lucchese boss Carmine Tramunti. In the wake of these arrests, the Purple Gang filled the power vacuum created within the drug trade in East Harlem, eventually dominating the heroin trade in Harlem and the South Bronx and becoming not only major independent drug distributors but also major drug distributors for New York's "Five Families."[1] In addition to drug trafficking and murder, the Purple Gang's other activities included kidnapping rival drug dealers for ransom, collecting loansharking debts, extortion, and labor racketeering, sometimes carrying out these activities independently and sometimes acting on behalf of one of the Five Families.[7]

Throughout the 1970s, Italian-American and African-American organized crime groups both controlled narcotics trafficking in Harlem and much of New York City, and the two ethnic crime groups often cooperated or worked closely together in the drug trade business. The Italian-American Purple Gang was especially closely connected with African-American organized crime groups in Harlem. The Purple Gang eventually began supplying heroin to infamous Harlem drug kingpin Leroy Barnes and his organized crime network. After the arrest of Leroy Barnes, who was at the time one of the top heroin dealers in Harlem, the Purple Gang began supplying heroin to his remaining network of African-American dealers in Harlem at $75,000 per kilogram.[1]

The Purple Gang became increasingly involved with murder, sometimes acting independently and sometimes as contract k*llers for the Mafia, and they became renowned for their "enormous capacity for violence."[6][8][9] By 1977, law enforcement claimed that the Purple Gang committed at least 17 homicides, with many of these murders committed on behalf of 'organized crime principals' (i.e. Italian-American Mafia families.) [3] Many of the murders attributed to the Purple Gang were exceedingly grisly, with some involving decapitation, dismemberment, or multiple stab wounds. The gang is also suspected to be involved in a rash of k*llings during the 1970s of various mobsters and people with organized crime connections, with the murders notably involving .22 caliber firearms.[7] Dismemberment and .22 caliber k*llings subsequently became known in the underworld as the trademark of the Purple Gang.

According to police reports, at the peak of its strength in 1977 the Purple Gang consisted of approximately 30 members and over 80 a*sociates, with higher numbers placing the gang's membership as over 100 (though this may include a*sociates.) Most of the gang's members were younger men in their 20s or 30s, many of whom were considered by the Mafia to be too reckless or "uncontrollable" for membership in the Mafia. [3][5]

Though technically an independent gang that operated largely outside the constraints and structure of the established "Five Families" of the New York Italian-American Mafia, the Purple Gang was closely tied to Italian-American Mafia and would often freelance as "muscle" or hit-men for the larger New York families. Many Purple Gang members were in fact relatives of established Italian Mafia members.[6] However, it remains unclear what activities the gang performed independently and what activities the gang carried out for certain Mafia families. For instance, several members were notably arrested in Monroe, New York in Upstate New York for a*saulting private sanitation workers, suggesting the gang may have been involved in labor corruption or extortion within the sanitation business, either independently or as enforcers for the New York Mafia.[1] Though the gang often worked for the Five Families and frequently acted as drug distributors for the Five Families, they were also noted for their "lack of respect for other members of organized crime," and they just as often competed with the Mafia or disregarded the Mafia's turf claims and orders, sometimes moving in on Mafia drug territory. In fact, law enforcement at one point feared that a mob war would break out between the Purple Gang and certain Mafia families, specifically Carmine Galante's Bonanno Crime Family, and the gang became so powerful and feared that it was sometimes referred to as New York City's "Sixth Family."[5][6]

Law enforcement speculated that during the late 1970s, the Purple Gang began developed a relationship with Nicaraguan drug dealers, trading firearms for drugs.[3] The firearms were apparently sent to Latin American narcoterrorists through connections in Florida in exchange for smuggled drugs.[1] The Purple Gang was also suspected of having ties to the Cuban Mafia in Florida.[5]

The Purple Gang disintegrated during the late 1970s and early 1980s and was absorbed into the current 116th Street Crew. Some members were invited to join the Mafia and became made men, including Angelo Prisco and Daniel Leo[10] who became the acting boss of the Genovese crime family in 2005.[11] Bonnano boss Michael Mancuso was also a member of the Purple Gang.



its from wiki so who knows the validity but Ive really never heard the bolded before.........


so The Purple gang and The Gemini Crew were both at full force at the same time.....jesus fu*king christ

 3 months ago '16        #696
smokeytheblunt2  5 heat pts5 OP
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The Genovese have ended up taking in a lot of rebels and people deemed too uncontrollable over the years. they took in some of the Gallo rebels which included Punchy and Albert Gallo and then they took in Angelo Prisco and Danny Leo all of whom rose to captain or in Leo's case above............

 3 months ago '16        #697
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Suspected mob boss k*ller thought victim was ‘prominent member of the deep state’
By Chris Perez July 22, 2019

The man accused of gunning down a Mafia kingpin on Staten Island wasn’t intending to k*ll a mob boss that day, his lawyer says.

In his eyes, Anthony Comello was taking out “a prominent member of the deep state” — whom he allegedly tried to “arrest” at first.

“He ardently believed that Francesco Cali, a boss in the Gambino crime family, was a prominent member of the deep state, and, accordingly, an appropriate target for a citizen’s arrest,” said Comello’s attorney, Robert C. Gottlieb, in court documents filed Friday.

“Mr. Comello became certain that he was enjoying the protection of President Trump himself, and that he had the president’s full support,” Gottlieb added, according to the New York Times.

The 24-year-old had been convinced that Cali was connected to the infamous QAnon conspiracy, which claims there’s a political “deep state” secretly running the country from within the government, among other things.

“Mr. Comello’s support for ‘QAnon’ went beyond mere participation in a radical political organization,” his lawyer said. “It evolved into a delusional obsession.” Gottlieb intends to argue in court that Comello’s delusions about the QAnon conspiracy drove him to commit murder — and that they are enough to prove he is not guilty by reason of insanity. He’s seeking to have Comello placed in psychiatric care, rather than prison.

According to Gottlieb, the young man’s obsession with the “deep state” and other QAnon conspiracies — like the belief that certain Democratic politicians are secretly pedophiles — led to him making multiple “arrest” attempts earlier this year.

In February, Comello allegedly tried to take Mayor de Blasio into custody on two separate occasions, one of which involved him showing up at Gracie Mansion. He then attempted to place two California Democrats under arrest — Reps. Maxine Waters and Adam Schiff — and even tried getting the US Marshal Service to help. But they reportedly denied his request.

The incidents were later confirmed by law enforcement officials.

Over the years, Comello made “thousands and thousands” of posts, messages and forum comments about the QAnon conspiracies, which Gottlieb plans to use in court as evidence.

“Patriot sleeper cells are awake,” he wrote on one occasion.

Gottlieb said Comello believed that Cali, a member of the Gambino crime family, had been connected to the deep state after seeing a post online that suggested Mafia figures were also part of the conspiracy.

He is accused of k*lling the mob boss on March 13 outside his Todt Hill home. The slaying was believed to be “premeditated” — with prosecutors charging Comello with second-degree murder.

“The defendant fired 12 bullets, striking him 11 times,” said Staten Island a*sistant district attorney Carrie Low at Comello’s bail hearing. “He drove by the victim’s house several times hours before the attack.”

During his first court appearance in March, Comello showed up with his palm covered in drawings of symbols and phrases tied to QAnon. Low described him at the time as a member of the “far-right organization.”

“He believes that only their laws are the laws he and the rest of this country should follow,” she said.

Comello is due back in court on Aug. 13.



one of the things that's come out of the Italy arrests is that they really want that kid dead over there..........

the longer he goes untouched the bigger the possibility that his family will...........

 3 months ago '16        #698
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Larry and Albert Gallo............dont think I've ever seen a pic of all three brothers together........dont think Ive ever seen a pic of Joey and Albert together either actually

 3 months ago '16        #699
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Joey Gallo and Mondo Illiano..........





Anthony Abbatemarco, Albert Gallo and Punchy Illiano after they saved the children pictured from a house fire.........





Punchy and Albert.........





Gallo gang with Albert holding court in the middle.......





Joey and Larry with Joe Jelly(I think) in the middle.............

 3 months ago '16        #700
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Larry and Punchy............



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